Lindsey Graham's opponent Jaime Harrison smashes all-time Senate fundraising record, outspending Graham by a huge margin

If money can buy political votes, veteran Senator Lindsey Graham is toast.  His re-election opponent, Jaime Harrison, has raised more money in the third quarter of 2020 than any Senate candidate in history, outdistancing even Beto O'Rourke, who ran in Texas, with a population almost six times larger than South Carolina.  James Arkin of Politico writes:

South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison raised a staggering $57 million in the third quarter of this year, shattering the previous record for a Senate candidate as he seeks to unseat GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham.

The haul only increases Harrison's massive financial advantage over Graham, who is seeking a fourth term in the Senate and facing the most competitive reelection race of his career.

Harrison's total is nearly $20 million more than then-Rep. Beto O'Rourke's previous record from the third quarter of 2018, when he brought in $38.1 million from July through September of that year for a Senate race in Texas. Harrison's campaign said he received 1.5 million donations during the three-month period from 994,000 donors, with an average of just $37. His campaign did not share how much cash Harrison had on hand as of Sept. 30.

Graham has not yet released his third-quarter fundraising totals. He raised $8.4 million in the second quarter and had $15 million in the bank as of June 30. Graham has increasingly signaled that he's in dire financial straits: Late last month, he went on Fox News twice in a single day and implored viewers to donate to his campaign, saying he was "getting overwhelmed."

Before they became the party of the oligarchy, Democrats used to denounce "money politics."  Now they count on outspending Republicans to buy office.  And the level of saturation advertising that Harrison can buy with $57 million to spend in 90 days in a state with just over 5 million people in it is staggering.  The largest television market serving South Carolina is actually Charlotte, North Carolina, which sits on the border, but Charlotte is only the 21st largest in the country.  In the relatively inexpensive media markets Greenville-Spartanburg (#38), Columbia (#75), and Charleston (#91), that kind of money can buy almost nonstop ads, to the point that diminishing returns kick in and resentment may even be a factor.

Harrison is going hard against Graham, demanding a COVID test by the incumbent as a condition for a TV debate and, after Graham declined based on having had a negative result a few days ago, resulting in separate 25-minute interviews on Greenville station WSPA Friday night.  


Via WSPA TV and the Post and Courier.

During that program, Harrison did not repeat his suggestion on Wednesday that Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, whose confirmation hearings are being managed by Graham as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, would "roll back civil rights" and that "I don't look good in chains, so I'm not going back to that."

With the confirmation hearings beginning today, Graham will get a lot of free airtime.  How South Carolinians would react to attacks on a religious conservative woman has got to worry Harrison and have him hoping Mazie Hirono keeps her yap shut. 

 

 

If money can buy political votes, veteran Senator Lindsey Graham is toast.  His re-election opponent, Jaime Harrison, has raised more money in the third quarter of 2020 than any Senate candidate in history, outdistancing even Beto O'Rourke, who ran in Texas, with a population almost six times larger than South Carolina.  James Arkin of Politico writes:

South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison raised a staggering $57 million in the third quarter of this year, shattering the previous record for a Senate candidate as he seeks to unseat GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham.

The haul only increases Harrison's massive financial advantage over Graham, who is seeking a fourth term in the Senate and facing the most competitive reelection race of his career.

Harrison's total is nearly $20 million more than then-Rep. Beto O'Rourke's previous record from the third quarter of 2018, when he brought in $38.1 million from July through September of that year for a Senate race in Texas. Harrison's campaign said he received 1.5 million donations during the three-month period from 994,000 donors, with an average of just $37. His campaign did not share how much cash Harrison had on hand as of Sept. 30.

Graham has not yet released his third-quarter fundraising totals. He raised $8.4 million in the second quarter and had $15 million in the bank as of June 30. Graham has increasingly signaled that he's in dire financial straits: Late last month, he went on Fox News twice in a single day and implored viewers to donate to his campaign, saying he was "getting overwhelmed."

Before they became the party of the oligarchy, Democrats used to denounce "money politics."  Now they count on outspending Republicans to buy office.  And the level of saturation advertising that Harrison can buy with $57 million to spend in 90 days in a state with just over 5 million people in it is staggering.  The largest television market serving South Carolina is actually Charlotte, North Carolina, which sits on the border, but Charlotte is only the 21st largest in the country.  In the relatively inexpensive media markets Greenville-Spartanburg (#38), Columbia (#75), and Charleston (#91), that kind of money can buy almost nonstop ads, to the point that diminishing returns kick in and resentment may even be a factor.

Harrison is going hard against Graham, demanding a COVID test by the incumbent as a condition for a TV debate and, after Graham declined based on having had a negative result a few days ago, resulting in separate 25-minute interviews on Greenville station WSPA Friday night.  


Via WSPA TV and the Post and Courier.

During that program, Harrison did not repeat his suggestion on Wednesday that Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, whose confirmation hearings are being managed by Graham as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, would "roll back civil rights" and that "I don't look good in chains, so I'm not going back to that."

With the confirmation hearings beginning today, Graham will get a lot of free airtime.  How South Carolinians would react to attacks on a religious conservative woman has got to worry Harrison and have him hoping Mazie Hirono keeps her yap shut.