When it comes to leftism, it seems that Hollywood can't help itself

The 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards took place Sunday night.  It was a weird, semi-virtual show because California continues to exist in a state of suspended animation thanks to the 188-day-long "15-day lockdown" to flatten the curve of the Wuhan virus.  Of course, the show had to have its politically correct moments, all of which were uncomfortable and unfunny.  The peak leftist moment was a brief Maoist struggle session between Jimmy Kimmel and Anthony Anderson, who stars in Black-ish.

I don't watch any of the shows that were nominated — I'm strictly a Tucker Carlson and Turner Classic Movies kind of gal — so I neither know nor care what was nominated or what won.  For that information, you'll have to find another post.  However, I couldn't miss the bizarre obsession with race and good-thinking about race.

Before getting there, a little background.  First, Jimmy Kimmel, who hosted the virtual Emmy show, did blackface comic sketches back in the pre-modern era of the 1990s.  Kimmel wasn't doing the really old-fashioned blackface from the 1940s and before, when white actors painted their faces black, and proceeded to denigrate black people.  Instead, Kimmel was doing comic routines that mimicked well known black celebrities.  He groveled when caught but apparently insufficiently.

Second, the show Black-ish stars a group of extremely famous, wealthy people being comedic about both actual racism and microaggressions in America.  It is generally a very politically correct show.  The star, Anthony Anderson, is estimated to have a net worth of $25 million.

Anderson took to the little stage to do a riff entirely defined by his race:

"You know we have a record number of black Emmy nominees this year, which is great," said Anderson, after joining Kimmel on stage. "This was supposed to be the blackest Emmys ever. You wouldn't have even been able to handle how black it was going to be. But because of covid, we can't even get in the damn building."

"We would have had speeches, quoting our great poets," he continued. "But instead of that sexy melanated energy, here I am alone in a sterilized green room, trying not to sneeze on a lama.

Anderson's mojo really got going when he forced a deeply uncomfortable-looking Jimmy Kimmel to join in the Black Lives Matter chant (which came complete with a totally random, mean dig at Mike Pence).  Because the only thing at risk was Kimmel's career, not his life, the sketch was like watching a bizarre parody of a Maoist struggle session during the Cultural Revolution:

About ten seconds in, I suddenly realized what the scene reminded me of:

The Wuhan virus lockdown has destroyed so many good businesses and the lives of so many good people.  There are some silver linings, though.

The colleges and universities that have been Ground Zero for every bad idea from political correctness to critical race theory to third-wave feminism are going bankrupt.  Public school teachers' unions are being exposed good and hard for the scam they are.  And Hollywood is hurting — and it deserves to.

Image: Jimmy Kimmel and Anthony Anderson.  YouTube screen grab.

The 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards took place Sunday night.  It was a weird, semi-virtual show because California continues to exist in a state of suspended animation thanks to the 188-day-long "15-day lockdown" to flatten the curve of the Wuhan virus.  Of course, the show had to have its politically correct moments, all of which were uncomfortable and unfunny.  The peak leftist moment was a brief Maoist struggle session between Jimmy Kimmel and Anthony Anderson, who stars in Black-ish.

I don't watch any of the shows that were nominated — I'm strictly a Tucker Carlson and Turner Classic Movies kind of gal — so I neither know nor care what was nominated or what won.  For that information, you'll have to find another post.  However, I couldn't miss the bizarre obsession with race and good-thinking about race.

Before getting there, a little background.  First, Jimmy Kimmel, who hosted the virtual Emmy show, did blackface comic sketches back in the pre-modern era of the 1990s.  Kimmel wasn't doing the really old-fashioned blackface from the 1940s and before, when white actors painted their faces black, and proceeded to denigrate black people.  Instead, Kimmel was doing comic routines that mimicked well known black celebrities.  He groveled when caught but apparently insufficiently.

Second, the show Black-ish stars a group of extremely famous, wealthy people being comedic about both actual racism and microaggressions in America.  It is generally a very politically correct show.  The star, Anthony Anderson, is estimated to have a net worth of $25 million.

Anderson took to the little stage to do a riff entirely defined by his race:

"You know we have a record number of black Emmy nominees this year, which is great," said Anderson, after joining Kimmel on stage. "This was supposed to be the blackest Emmys ever. You wouldn't have even been able to handle how black it was going to be. But because of covid, we can't even get in the damn building."

"We would have had speeches, quoting our great poets," he continued. "But instead of that sexy melanated energy, here I am alone in a sterilized green room, trying not to sneeze on a lama.

Anderson's mojo really got going when he forced a deeply uncomfortable-looking Jimmy Kimmel to join in the Black Lives Matter chant (which came complete with a totally random, mean dig at Mike Pence).  Because the only thing at risk was Kimmel's career, not his life, the sketch was like watching a bizarre parody of a Maoist struggle session during the Cultural Revolution:

About ten seconds in, I suddenly realized what the scene reminded me of:

The Wuhan virus lockdown has destroyed so many good businesses and the lives of so many good people.  There are some silver linings, though.

The colleges and universities that have been Ground Zero for every bad idea from political correctness to critical race theory to third-wave feminism are going bankrupt.  Public school teachers' unions are being exposed good and hard for the scam they are.  And Hollywood is hurting — and it deserves to.

Image: Jimmy Kimmel and Anthony Anderson.  YouTube screen grab.