Ohio's pro-life governor makes another bizarre pro-abortion appointment

Gov. Mike DeWine, Republican of Ohio, has stepped in it again. Dr. Amy Acton resigned as director of the Ohio Health Department in June and then again in August as the governor's health adviser.  DeWine subsequently nominated Dr. Joan Duwve to head the state's health department.  In nominating Duwve, who most recently served as director of public health in South Carolina, DeWine is quoted as saying: "Dr. Duwve shares my passion for and commitment to children's issues and many other pressing public health issues[.] "

This turned into another embarrassment for the governor.  Going back to Acton, during her tenure as health director, she came under fire for exaggerating how lethal the Wuhan virus was, her role in the ensuring state lockdowns, and her previous pro-abortion activism.  You would think DeWine, a career politician, would have learned a lesson.  But no: It turns out that his Dr. Duwve's passion for "children's issues" doesn't extend to the unborn, as the woman once worked for the nation's foremost abortion provider, Planned Parenthood. 

The Chinese virus notwithstanding, abortion is an important factor to consider in choosing a health director.  This is because the Ohio Department of Health regulates the abortion facilities in the state and has the authority to close them down if it is believed they are violating the law.  Why would DeWine, who received strong support from pro-life groups during his campaign, put a fox in charge of the henhouse?  Dan Tierney, a DeWine spokesman, said the governor was aware that Duwve previously worked for Planned Parenthood and nominated her anyway. 

Fortunately, just a few days after being selected by DeWine, Duwve backed out.  She cited her "concerns over the harassment experienced" by her predecessor, Dr. Acton.  But what Dr. Duwve calls harassment was mostly criticism and scrutiny that Acton came under as she starting playing around with the livelihood of millions in Ohio.  Duwve seems to believe that bureaucrats and their actions should be above criticism.

Commenting on the situation, Ohio Right to Life president Mike Gonidakis said: "There was absolutely zero chance of her [Dr. Duwve] being confirmed by the Ohio Senate."  Given the strong pro-life make-up of that body, Gonidakis is right.  So what in the world was DeWine thinking?  Doesn't he know how the wind is blowing in Ohio?  Can't he and his staff properly vet candidates for important positions?  Or is the governor unable to connect the dots between a person's background and the likely decisions he is apt to make?

DeWine brings to mind what Casey Stengel said when he was managing the hapless 1962 New York Mets, who won just 42 games out of the 162 they played: "Can't anyone here play this game?"

Image: Yahoo Finance via YouTube.

Gov. Mike DeWine, Republican of Ohio, has stepped in it again. Dr. Amy Acton resigned as director of the Ohio Health Department in June and then again in August as the governor's health adviser.  DeWine subsequently nominated Dr. Joan Duwve to head the state's health department.  In nominating Duwve, who most recently served as director of public health in South Carolina, DeWine is quoted as saying: "Dr. Duwve shares my passion for and commitment to children's issues and many other pressing public health issues[.] "

This turned into another embarrassment for the governor.  Going back to Acton, during her tenure as health director, she came under fire for exaggerating how lethal the Wuhan virus was, her role in the ensuring state lockdowns, and her previous pro-abortion activism.  You would think DeWine, a career politician, would have learned a lesson.  But no: It turns out that his Dr. Duwve's passion for "children's issues" doesn't extend to the unborn, as the woman once worked for the nation's foremost abortion provider, Planned Parenthood. 

The Chinese virus notwithstanding, abortion is an important factor to consider in choosing a health director.  This is because the Ohio Department of Health regulates the abortion facilities in the state and has the authority to close them down if it is believed they are violating the law.  Why would DeWine, who received strong support from pro-life groups during his campaign, put a fox in charge of the henhouse?  Dan Tierney, a DeWine spokesman, said the governor was aware that Duwve previously worked for Planned Parenthood and nominated her anyway. 

Fortunately, just a few days after being selected by DeWine, Duwve backed out.  She cited her "concerns over the harassment experienced" by her predecessor, Dr. Acton.  But what Dr. Duwve calls harassment was mostly criticism and scrutiny that Acton came under as she starting playing around with the livelihood of millions in Ohio.  Duwve seems to believe that bureaucrats and their actions should be above criticism.

Commenting on the situation, Ohio Right to Life president Mike Gonidakis said: "There was absolutely zero chance of her [Dr. Duwve] being confirmed by the Ohio Senate."  Given the strong pro-life make-up of that body, Gonidakis is right.  So what in the world was DeWine thinking?  Doesn't he know how the wind is blowing in Ohio?  Can't he and his staff properly vet candidates for important positions?  Or is the governor unable to connect the dots between a person's background and the likely decisions he is apt to make?

DeWine brings to mind what Casey Stengel said when he was managing the hapless 1962 New York Mets, who won just 42 games out of the 162 they played: "Can't anyone here play this game?"

Image: Yahoo Finance via YouTube.