Blow Dryer Rebellion: Angry beauty parlor–owners hang blow dryers, curling irons from tree near Nancy Pelosi's home

How do you know a movement has caught fire?

When the symbols start appearing.  Everyday symbols, placed preposterously, mockingly, giving a scandal a name and associating it with the tangible, the popular.  It's very effectively used in Latin America, where housewives in Chile started the practice, banging on pots and pans to protest the communist Allende-Castro puppet regime's signature socialist food shortages.  Coat hangers for abortion supporters, underwear for Clinton protesters — when it happens, it's a popular movement that's taken off. 

And in this case, the instrument is blow dryers and curling irons, and the target is House speaker Nancy Pelosi, who turned up at an expensive San Francisco hair salon to get her hair done, not even wearing a mask, while everyone else had to stay home, and every salon had to legally remain shut, ostensibly out of fear of COVID, an old crisis that has since peaked.  The unused blow dryers are now turning up in trees, as loony decorations, a tangible symbol to show that the public is outraged.  And that's one heck of a memorable protest.

After all, the rules that keep salons shut are not observed by the elites.  Just little people have to play by those oppressive rules. 

It's the work of angry hairstylists, who have been forced to pay a disproportionate price for COVID, as have gyms, churches, small "nonessential" businesses, schools, restaurants, bars, and other small fry — and stay closed, pretty much forever, until the last COVID case goes away.  There is no other plan put out by the blue states, and that's effectively a death sentence on their businesses — for nothing.  Most were never big spreaders, and all have options to lessen the risk of spread through masks and social distancing, but no matter — the tyrants order the businesses to stay shut — except in the case where some animals are more equal than others.  Right, Nance?

It's getting to be outrageous — and outrageous acts of oppression merit outrageous acts of protest.  One can only hope Nancy Pelosi will be followed by blow dryer protests wherever she goes.

It's fascinating that the hair salons are at the spearhead of this movement rather than other types of businesses, which are sure to follow.  There have been incidents in Texas and Michigan where salon-owners and barbers have refused to close doors and triggered legal incidents.  There's the case of Brandon Straka, a hairdresser who has had enough of Democrat rage and founded a movement to get away from them called #WalkAway.  Straka is gay, and there are many gay people in the trade.  The gay movement in particular has been extremely good as the use of symbols — triangles, rainbow flags, equals signs...  Now there's the blow dryer rebellion.  And hairdressers have been known to play pivotal roles in revolutions.

Let's hope this one gets ever wilder and more impressive, forcing Pelosi and pals into ending their petty little satrapy of shutdowns.  

Image credit: Lasse Burholt, via YouTube, screen shot, enhanced with FotoSketcher.

How do you know a movement has caught fire?

When the symbols start appearing.  Everyday symbols, placed preposterously, mockingly, giving a scandal a name and associating it with the tangible, the popular.  It's very effectively used in Latin America, where housewives in Chile started the practice, banging on pots and pans to protest the communist Allende-Castro puppet regime's signature socialist food shortages.  Coat hangers for abortion supporters, underwear for Clinton protesters — when it happens, it's a popular movement that's taken off. 

And in this case, the instrument is blow dryers and curling irons, and the target is House speaker Nancy Pelosi, who turned up at an expensive San Francisco hair salon to get her hair done, not even wearing a mask, while everyone else had to stay home, and every salon had to legally remain shut, ostensibly out of fear of COVID, an old crisis that has since peaked.  The unused blow dryers are now turning up in trees, as loony decorations, a tangible symbol to show that the public is outraged.  And that's one heck of a memorable protest.

After all, the rules that keep salons shut are not observed by the elites.  Just little people have to play by those oppressive rules. 

It's the work of angry hairstylists, who have been forced to pay a disproportionate price for COVID, as have gyms, churches, small "nonessential" businesses, schools, restaurants, bars, and other small fry — and stay closed, pretty much forever, until the last COVID case goes away.  There is no other plan put out by the blue states, and that's effectively a death sentence on their businesses — for nothing.  Most were never big spreaders, and all have options to lessen the risk of spread through masks and social distancing, but no matter — the tyrants order the businesses to stay shut — except in the case where some animals are more equal than others.  Right, Nance?

It's getting to be outrageous — and outrageous acts of oppression merit outrageous acts of protest.  One can only hope Nancy Pelosi will be followed by blow dryer protests wherever she goes.

It's fascinating that the hair salons are at the spearhead of this movement rather than other types of businesses, which are sure to follow.  There have been incidents in Texas and Michigan where salon-owners and barbers have refused to close doors and triggered legal incidents.  There's the case of Brandon Straka, a hairdresser who has had enough of Democrat rage and founded a movement to get away from them called #WalkAway.  Straka is gay, and there are many gay people in the trade.  The gay movement in particular has been extremely good as the use of symbols — triangles, rainbow flags, equals signs...  Now there's the blow dryer rebellion.  And hairdressers have been known to play pivotal roles in revolutions.

Let's hope this one gets ever wilder and more impressive, forcing Pelosi and pals into ending their petty little satrapy of shutdowns.  

Image credit: Lasse Burholt, via YouTube, screen shot, enhanced with FotoSketcher.