Zoom educators call cops on virtual student

A Maryland fifth-grader got a visit from the police after his teacher called to report that she had seen a BB gun on the wall behind the student during a class video call.  The boy's mother, Courtney Lancaster Sperry, a Navy veteran, wrote a Facebook post stating: "While my son was on a Zoom call, a 'concerned parent' and subsequently two teachers saw his properly stowed and mounted Red Ryder BB gun and one other BB gun in the background.  He was not holding them and never intentionally showed them on video.  In fact, he was oblivious that they could even be seen in the background."

One of the teachers told the school's principal, who decided to call the police to report the guns and ask that the home be searched.  Hmm...have a warrant?  Probable cause?  Do teachers and principals now have the power of judges, juries, the FBI?  (Ever notice that progressives disdain and eschew the police unless and until they want to use them to oppress those with whom they disagree?)  When this country was lapping the world economically and defeating supposedly invincible foes like Hitler's Germany and Tojo's Japan — at the same time — nearly every kid had a Red Ryder BB gun or a .22 rifle...and a lot of them in rural areas brought them to school.  That is when Uncle Sam had balls and was not "non-binary," and when American citizens were unafraid of being disliked for...the right reasons.

Since her son was targeted by an "educator" who thought there was a scary-looking gun on her son's bedroom wall, Sperry has been warning other parents about the lack of privacy during virtual classes.  She stated that the principal and the teacher cited a rule stating that students may not bring guns to school and claimed it extended to virtual classes as well.  She said the school handbook does not address rules for virtual learning at all and added, "He did not BRING anything to this meeting, and he is in his own home" and noted (of the "guns"), "They were simply in the background in our home, safely stowed in a room behind a closed door, with no ammunition (if you can even call it that)."

Sperry's son did not "bring anything to school."  Rather, the school was brought into their private home. It is offensive — and scary — to me that a Zoom-conveyed image of government academicians can invade the space where a perfectly innocent child and mother — and firearm — reside.  Firearms, like mama Sperry's Navy, have been tireless defenders of freedom and underdogs for many decades now.

The same cannot be said of government schools.

Would the teacher or principal have sicced the cops on Sperry and her son if they had spotted a vibrator, adult movie, or Planned Parenthood flyer in their house?  A screen shot of the upcoming Netflix movie Cuties?  A copy of Heather Has Two Mommies?  A bong or spliff?  A brochure from the Church of Satan?  Of course not.

But, to "progressives," a BB gun or a Swiss Army knife is a bridge too far, a relic from a time when the government feared — and therefore honored — its citizens, unlike today, when the citizens fear the government...whether they honor it or not.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.

A Maryland fifth-grader got a visit from the police after his teacher called to report that she had seen a BB gun on the wall behind the student during a class video call.  The boy's mother, Courtney Lancaster Sperry, a Navy veteran, wrote a Facebook post stating: "While my son was on a Zoom call, a 'concerned parent' and subsequently two teachers saw his properly stowed and mounted Red Ryder BB gun and one other BB gun in the background.  He was not holding them and never intentionally showed them on video.  In fact, he was oblivious that they could even be seen in the background."

One of the teachers told the school's principal, who decided to call the police to report the guns and ask that the home be searched.  Hmm...have a warrant?  Probable cause?  Do teachers and principals now have the power of judges, juries, the FBI?  (Ever notice that progressives disdain and eschew the police unless and until they want to use them to oppress those with whom they disagree?)  When this country was lapping the world economically and defeating supposedly invincible foes like Hitler's Germany and Tojo's Japan — at the same time — nearly every kid had a Red Ryder BB gun or a .22 rifle...and a lot of them in rural areas brought them to school.  That is when Uncle Sam had balls and was not "non-binary," and when American citizens were unafraid of being disliked for...the right reasons.

Since her son was targeted by an "educator" who thought there was a scary-looking gun on her son's bedroom wall, Sperry has been warning other parents about the lack of privacy during virtual classes.  She stated that the principal and the teacher cited a rule stating that students may not bring guns to school and claimed it extended to virtual classes as well.  She said the school handbook does not address rules for virtual learning at all and added, "He did not BRING anything to this meeting, and he is in his own home" and noted (of the "guns"), "They were simply in the background in our home, safely stowed in a room behind a closed door, with no ammunition (if you can even call it that)."

Sperry's son did not "bring anything to school."  Rather, the school was brought into their private home. It is offensive — and scary — to me that a Zoom-conveyed image of government academicians can invade the space where a perfectly innocent child and mother — and firearm — reside.  Firearms, like mama Sperry's Navy, have been tireless defenders of freedom and underdogs for many decades now.

The same cannot be said of government schools.

Would the teacher or principal have sicced the cops on Sperry and her son if they had spotted a vibrator, adult movie, or Planned Parenthood flyer in their house?  A screen shot of the upcoming Netflix movie Cuties?  A copy of Heather Has Two Mommies?  A bong or spliff?  A brochure from the Church of Satan?  Of course not.

But, to "progressives," a BB gun or a Swiss Army knife is a bridge too far, a relic from a time when the government feared — and therefore honored — its citizens, unlike today, when the citizens fear the government...whether they honor it or not.

Image credit: Pixabay public domain.