The Democrats' USPS insanity is a reminder that leftism is an urban disease

With all their big attacks against Trump having failed, the Democrats have taken to attacking the upcoming election's integrity.  They used the Wuhan virus to justify mail-in voting, which is an invitation to massive fraud.  When Trump appointed a postmaster general who wanted to make the United States Post Office more efficient, they used his efforts to claim that Trump is trying to steal the election.  As proof of this, they pointed to mailboxes that had been removed, locked up, or stacked in heaps.

Each of the Democrats' points about the mailboxes was proven wrong.  But the fascinating thing is why they were so invested in the mailboxes: it's because mailboxes matter in urban areas.  They don't matter half so much in suburban and rural areas.

In suburban and rural areas, people can and do routinely stick their outgoing mail in their mailbox.  They then raise the little red flag on the box, which is a signal to the mail carrier that, in addition to delivering mail, he should look for the outgoing mail.  Residents can also clip their correspondence to the mailbox, secure in the knowledge that the mail carrier will take it the next day.

It's only in cities that mailboxes are so important.  Urban houses have mail delivery systems that are set up so the mail is pushed into a slot that deposits it inside the house, where thieves can't get at it.  In large apartment complexes, where the mailboxes are in a public hall, with lots of comings and goings, people would never dream of leaving their outgoing mail sitting by the box — again, because of the risk of theft.  The familiar blue United States Post Office mailbox is the safest way to send off mail.

That reality explains why you can get Democrat urban dwellers hysterical about vanishing mailboxes.  (As a reminder, they're not disappearing.)

So many other leftist shibboleths are dependent upon urban dwellers to keep them alive.  Anthropogenic climate change and nature's powerlessness in the face of human conduct seem like a real thing when you're in a densely packed city with trees planted in cut-outs along the cement sidewalk.  Man is in charge, not nature.

However, when you leave the city, you realize how overwhelmingly powerful nature is and how, if you relax your vigilance for even a day, life will assert itself.  Watching this power in action tends to make anthropogenic climate change seem silly.  We humans can pollute our local environment and permanently change the landscape around us (e.g., strip-mining in the Sierras, clear-cutting across Europe for centuries, etc.), but our ability to change the vastly complex climate of the whole earth...let's just say non-city-dwellers are skeptical.

It's also city-dwellers who believe that the Green New Deal can work.  They live in vertical spaces, not horizontal ones.  In vertical spaces, you travel by elevators and escalators.  In horizontal ones, with things more spread out, cars are desirable.  With the Wuhan virus driving urban residents out of their vertical environments, they might change their tune about giving up reliance on fossil fuels.

In urban environments, everyone is a stranger.  People have their friends from work, but when they hit the sidewalk or go into a store, they're surrounded by unfamiliar faces.  There is very little social control, trust, or conscience when you don't know people.  You need to be able to classify people quickly, and stereotypes come in handy.

In a smaller community, where faces become familiar, the trust and control are higher.  You know that man's children are in your school; that woman lives down the street from you; and that child is trouble for your children.  You don't need ugly stereotypes to help you navigate your day, and you don't need the government in your face all the time, pretending to be the only friend you have.

And of course, when it comes to mailboxes, you know that those blue boxes are a convenience for city-dwellers.  You also understand that if you vote by absentee ballot, the mail carrier will take your ballot right off your property for you.

Image: US Post Office Mail Box Still Standing by Phillip Pessar on Flickr, CC BY 2.0.

With all their big attacks against Trump having failed, the Democrats have taken to attacking the upcoming election's integrity.  They used the Wuhan virus to justify mail-in voting, which is an invitation to massive fraud.  When Trump appointed a postmaster general who wanted to make the United States Post Office more efficient, they used his efforts to claim that Trump is trying to steal the election.  As proof of this, they pointed to mailboxes that had been removed, locked up, or stacked in heaps.

Each of the Democrats' points about the mailboxes was proven wrong.  But the fascinating thing is why they were so invested in the mailboxes: it's because mailboxes matter in urban areas.  They don't matter half so much in suburban and rural areas.

In suburban and rural areas, people can and do routinely stick their outgoing mail in their mailbox.  They then raise the little red flag on the box, which is a signal to the mail carrier that, in addition to delivering mail, he should look for the outgoing mail.  Residents can also clip their correspondence to the mailbox, secure in the knowledge that the mail carrier will take it the next day.

It's only in cities that mailboxes are so important.  Urban houses have mail delivery systems that are set up so the mail is pushed into a slot that deposits it inside the house, where thieves can't get at it.  In large apartment complexes, where the mailboxes are in a public hall, with lots of comings and goings, people would never dream of leaving their outgoing mail sitting by the box — again, because of the risk of theft.  The familiar blue United States Post Office mailbox is the safest way to send off mail.

That reality explains why you can get Democrat urban dwellers hysterical about vanishing mailboxes.  (As a reminder, they're not disappearing.)

So many other leftist shibboleths are dependent upon urban dwellers to keep them alive.  Anthropogenic climate change and nature's powerlessness in the face of human conduct seem like a real thing when you're in a densely packed city with trees planted in cut-outs along the cement sidewalk.  Man is in charge, not nature.

However, when you leave the city, you realize how overwhelmingly powerful nature is and how, if you relax your vigilance for even a day, life will assert itself.  Watching this power in action tends to make anthropogenic climate change seem silly.  We humans can pollute our local environment and permanently change the landscape around us (e.g., strip-mining in the Sierras, clear-cutting across Europe for centuries, etc.), but our ability to change the vastly complex climate of the whole earth...let's just say non-city-dwellers are skeptical.

It's also city-dwellers who believe that the Green New Deal can work.  They live in vertical spaces, not horizontal ones.  In vertical spaces, you travel by elevators and escalators.  In horizontal ones, with things more spread out, cars are desirable.  With the Wuhan virus driving urban residents out of their vertical environments, they might change their tune about giving up reliance on fossil fuels.

In urban environments, everyone is a stranger.  People have their friends from work, but when they hit the sidewalk or go into a store, they're surrounded by unfamiliar faces.  There is very little social control, trust, or conscience when you don't know people.  You need to be able to classify people quickly, and stereotypes come in handy.

In a smaller community, where faces become familiar, the trust and control are higher.  You know that man's children are in your school; that woman lives down the street from you; and that child is trouble for your children.  You don't need ugly stereotypes to help you navigate your day, and you don't need the government in your face all the time, pretending to be the only friend you have.

And of course, when it comes to mailboxes, you know that those blue boxes are a convenience for city-dwellers.  You also understand that if you vote by absentee ballot, the mail carrier will take your ballot right off your property for you.

Image: US Post Office Mail Box Still Standing by Phillip Pessar on Flickr, CC BY 2.0.