Republicans hit it out of the park again on night two at the convention

In terms of setting and format, the second night of the Republican convention was the same as the first: people spoke in the magnificent Andrew Carnegie auditorium, in venues associated with American history, at the White House, and in a recording studio.  Everything was polished without being phony.  These were real Americans talking about matters that are deeply important to them.  And as on the first night, the convention made clear that this is a party that welcomes and will support minorities.

The theme for the night was Opportunity.  Some speakers spoke about the way America is a land of opportunity.  Others spoke about the way that Donald Trump restored opportunity in America by giving help where it was needed (Trump isn't giving money to crony entities such as Solyndra) and by paring back the onerous regulations that were making it increasingly impossible for small businesses — the ones that can't afford millions in political donations — to function.

As the evening unfolded, we didn't hear from victims.  We heard from Americans who, given the opportunity, will take care of themselves, their families, and their communities.  They were a cross-section of Americans: a Navajo leader, a dairy farmer, a lobsterman, a police officer, a reformed felon, an ophthalmologist who performs free cataract surgeries in impoverished countries (and who just happens to be Sen. Rand Paul), a small business–owner, a former Planned Parenthood worker, and so many more.

We were reminded, among other things, that President Trump values human life; that, as president, he has employed more women in high positions than any president before him; that he welcomes legal immigrants to this country (as shown by his appearing for a live naturalization ceremony in the White House); and that his children love and respect him.

There were so many good speakers and so many moving videos that it's difficult to select just those few that will give you an idea about the evening if you didn't get a chance to watch.  I'm leaving a lot on the table, but if you have any time, I suggest the following speakers.

Jon Ponder was a felon whom the FBI finally caught for bank robbery.  The story of how he turned his life around, and about how an FBI agent who treated him with respect created a powerful friendship with an eventual impact on hundreds of people, is a two-part must-see:

Police officer Ryan Holet's story about the night his life collided with a heroin addict's life is another must-see:

Rand Paul's praise for Trump — a former opponent — is gracious and important.  He touches upon Trump's refusal to send Americans to die in unnecessary foreign wars, as well as his belief in smaller government:

Robert Vlaisavljevich, a lifelong Democrat and the mayor of Eveleth, Minnesota, in the Iron Range, talks about the way Trump is bringing jobs back to America:

For those who have begun to realize that the Democrats' fealty to abortion is not about keeping it safe, rare, and legal, but is, instead, something much closer to a pre-Judeo-Christian death cult, former Planned Parenthood employee Abby Johnson is worth watching:

And of course, we were all waiting for Nick Sandmann.  Standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, he talked about that day in January 2019, when leftist activists targeted him for his MAGA hat and the media defamed him, putting his life at risk.

Sandmann is the ultimate symbol of cancel culture.  He's also a symbol of fighting back against cancel culture because he sued those same media outlets for hundreds of millions of dollars.  Sandmann was composed and thoughtful, but you could still feel his anger at what the American media did to him — and be sure to watch until the last second:

Mike Pompeo spoke from Jerusalem.  He wouldn't have had to say a word to make his point about Trump's foreign policy, but he says quite a lot, all of it important:

Daniel Cameron, Kentucky's attorney general, is a star in the making.  Not only is he a thoughtful conservative and a good speaker, but he also has the opposite of that awful "resting bitch face" one so often sees.  Cameron has "resting smiling face."  He radiates joy:

There were other interesting speakers, but those were the standouts.  Melania Trump spoke, and it was a sweet speech, but her gift is personal interactions (or so I've heard), not public statements.

All told, it was an excellent night, easily matching the first for quality, sincerity, and power.  The point could not be clearer: this election is not about two different but positive visions of America.  This is about America versus the anti-America.  If you love America, Trump is the only candidate.

Image: Republican convention screen grab.

In terms of setting and format, the second night of the Republican convention was the same as the first: people spoke in the magnificent Andrew Carnegie auditorium, in venues associated with American history, at the White House, and in a recording studio.  Everything was polished without being phony.  These were real Americans talking about matters that are deeply important to them.  And as on the first night, the convention made clear that this is a party that welcomes and will support minorities.

The theme for the night was Opportunity.  Some speakers spoke about the way America is a land of opportunity.  Others spoke about the way that Donald Trump restored opportunity in America by giving help where it was needed (Trump isn't giving money to crony entities such as Solyndra) and by paring back the onerous regulations that were making it increasingly impossible for small businesses — the ones that can't afford millions in political donations — to function.

As the evening unfolded, we didn't hear from victims.  We heard from Americans who, given the opportunity, will take care of themselves, their families, and their communities.  They were a cross-section of Americans: a Navajo leader, a dairy farmer, a lobsterman, a police officer, a reformed felon, an ophthalmologist who performs free cataract surgeries in impoverished countries (and who just happens to be Sen. Rand Paul), a small business–owner, a former Planned Parenthood worker, and so many more.

We were reminded, among other things, that President Trump values human life; that, as president, he has employed more women in high positions than any president before him; that he welcomes legal immigrants to this country (as shown by his appearing for a live naturalization ceremony in the White House); and that his children love and respect him.

There were so many good speakers and so many moving videos that it's difficult to select just those few that will give you an idea about the evening if you didn't get a chance to watch.  I'm leaving a lot on the table, but if you have any time, I suggest the following speakers.

Jon Ponder was a felon whom the FBI finally caught for bank robbery.  The story of how he turned his life around, and about how an FBI agent who treated him with respect created a powerful friendship with an eventual impact on hundreds of people, is a two-part must-see:

Police officer Ryan Holet's story about the night his life collided with a heroin addict's life is another must-see:

Rand Paul's praise for Trump — a former opponent — is gracious and important.  He touches upon Trump's refusal to send Americans to die in unnecessary foreign wars, as well as his belief in smaller government:

Robert Vlaisavljevich, a lifelong Democrat and the mayor of Eveleth, Minnesota, in the Iron Range, talks about the way Trump is bringing jobs back to America:

For those who have begun to realize that the Democrats' fealty to abortion is not about keeping it safe, rare, and legal, but is, instead, something much closer to a pre-Judeo-Christian death cult, former Planned Parenthood employee Abby Johnson is worth watching:

And of course, we were all waiting for Nick Sandmann.  Standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, he talked about that day in January 2019, when leftist activists targeted him for his MAGA hat and the media defamed him, putting his life at risk.

Sandmann is the ultimate symbol of cancel culture.  He's also a symbol of fighting back against cancel culture because he sued those same media outlets for hundreds of millions of dollars.  Sandmann was composed and thoughtful, but you could still feel his anger at what the American media did to him — and be sure to watch until the last second:

Mike Pompeo spoke from Jerusalem.  He wouldn't have had to say a word to make his point about Trump's foreign policy, but he says quite a lot, all of it important:

Daniel Cameron, Kentucky's attorney general, is a star in the making.  Not only is he a thoughtful conservative and a good speaker, but he also has the opposite of that awful "resting bitch face" one so often sees.  Cameron has "resting smiling face."  He radiates joy:

There were other interesting speakers, but those were the standouts.  Melania Trump spoke, and it was a sweet speech, but her gift is personal interactions (or so I've heard), not public statements.

All told, it was an excellent night, easily matching the first for quality, sincerity, and power.  The point could not be clearer: this election is not about two different but positive visions of America.  This is about America versus the anti-America.  If you love America, Trump is the only candidate.

Image: Republican convention screen grab.