If you want to see media malice in a single article…

The second night of the Republican convention has come and gone (and very successfully, too), but what should live forever is the article the New York Times wrote about the line-up of speakers for the evening.  It is a triumph of misdirection and fraud by omission.  It may well be the most perfect example ever of how the media functions: not to inform, but to mislead.

The article, entitled "How to Watch the Republican National Convention," gives practical advice about how to find the convention on the internet and television.  Interestingly, it does not mention C-SPAN, which is proving to be a preferred venue for many conservative viewers.  What's really fascinating, though, is what the Times says and does not say about some of the speakers.

The article introduces Pam Bondi, not just as a former Florida attorney general, but adds a couple of additional factoids:

Former Attorney General Pam Bondi of Florida, who was part of Mr. Trump's legal defense team during impeachment proceedings. After her term as attorney general, she joined a lobbying firm that was subpoenaed by federal prosecutors last year.

The Times fails to mention that Trump prevailed in those impeachment proceedings.  It's also silent about the fact that the subpoena came from the highly politicized Manhattan U.S. attorney's office.

The article makes sure to imply that Kentucky attorney general Daniel Cameron may be engaged in dirty dealing over Breonna Taylor's much publicized death:

Attorney General Daniel Cameron of Kentucky, who last year became the first Black person elected to that role. He has been in the spotlight recently over his investigation of the police killing of Breonna Taylor.

The article tells readers that Mike Pompeo shouldn't be speaking at all:

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. His appearance may violate rules against partisan activity by State Department employees; in a recent memo to department employees, he said such activities were unacceptable even on personal time.

What the New York Times doesn't understand is that Mike Pompeo is not a civil servant, as is the case with other State Department employees.  He is, instead, a member of the president's Cabinet, which is an inherently political position.  Once upon a time, even Times employees weren't that dumb, but times (and the Times) have changed.

The article has a grossly misleading description for Nick Sandmann:

Nicholas Sandmann, a teenager from a Catholic high school in Kentucky who was involved in a confrontation with a Native American man at a protest last year.

An uninformed person, and there are many, would read those words and believe that the Republicans are giving a speaking spot to a teenage racist who got into a fight with a Native American.  The truth is that Sandmann, because he wore a MAGA hat; was the victim of an activist set-up, was pilloried by a dishonest, biased, and complicit media; and is now making that same media pay through their collective noses.

The article implies that Eric Trump is on the verge of being indicted:

Eric Trump, the president's son and an executive vice president of the Trump Organization. It was reported this week that the New York attorney general's office had asked a judge to order Eric Trump to submit to questioning under oath.

What it fails to mention is that the New York attorney general is a highly politicized leftist who uses her office to attack Trump and anyone associated with him or with the Republican party. Indeed, she just filed a suit seeking to dissolve the NRA.

All of the above are actively false or impliedly false statements.  Ironically, there was one person on the list who did not deserve to be at the convention, and, indeed, the Republicans removed her from the roster when they learned about her unsavory beliefs.  That is Mary Ann Mendoza, who supports a border wall because an illegal alien (or, as the Times says, "an undocumented immigrant") killed her son in a car crash.

The Times tried to tie Mendoza to Steve Bannon, which is stupid.  Her real sin is that she is an anti-Semite — and the Republicans instantly dropped her upon learning this.

The Democrats don't drop anti-Semites.  Instead, they have them speak at their convention, as they did with open anti-Semite Linda Sarsour.  Biden disavowed her, only to have his campaign apologize for that disavowal.  Nor have the Democrats disavowed Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, the Black Lives Matter movement, Al Sharpton, or any of the other anti-Semites at the heart of the party.  (Recall that when the Democrats were forced to address Omar's anti-Semitism, the best they could do was come up with an insipid statement condemning all sorts of bad thoughts.)

Trump is right.  Our mainstream media outlets are not about the news.  They're not even about being honestly partisan.  They are, instead, blatantly dishonest Democrat party propaganda outlets.

The second night of the Republican convention has come and gone (and very successfully, too), but what should live forever is the article the New York Times wrote about the line-up of speakers for the evening.  It is a triumph of misdirection and fraud by omission.  It may well be the most perfect example ever of how the media functions: not to inform, but to mislead.

The article, entitled "How to Watch the Republican National Convention," gives practical advice about how to find the convention on the internet and television.  Interestingly, it does not mention C-SPAN, which is proving to be a preferred venue for many conservative viewers.  What's really fascinating, though, is what the Times says and does not say about some of the speakers.

The article introduces Pam Bondi, not just as a former Florida attorney general, but adds a couple of additional factoids:

Former Attorney General Pam Bondi of Florida, who was part of Mr. Trump's legal defense team during impeachment proceedings. After her term as attorney general, she joined a lobbying firm that was subpoenaed by federal prosecutors last year.

The Times fails to mention that Trump prevailed in those impeachment proceedings.  It's also silent about the fact that the subpoena came from the highly politicized Manhattan U.S. attorney's office.

The article makes sure to imply that Kentucky attorney general Daniel Cameron may be engaged in dirty dealing over Breonna Taylor's much publicized death:

Attorney General Daniel Cameron of Kentucky, who last year became the first Black person elected to that role. He has been in the spotlight recently over his investigation of the police killing of Breonna Taylor.

The article tells readers that Mike Pompeo shouldn't be speaking at all:

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. His appearance may violate rules against partisan activity by State Department employees; in a recent memo to department employees, he said such activities were unacceptable even on personal time.

What the New York Times doesn't understand is that Mike Pompeo is not a civil servant, as is the case with other State Department employees.  He is, instead, a member of the president's Cabinet, which is an inherently political position.  Once upon a time, even Times employees weren't that dumb, but times (and the Times) have changed.

The article has a grossly misleading description for Nick Sandmann:

Nicholas Sandmann, a teenager from a Catholic high school in Kentucky who was involved in a confrontation with a Native American man at a protest last year.

An uninformed person, and there are many, would read those words and believe that the Republicans are giving a speaking spot to a teenage racist who got into a fight with a Native American.  The truth is that Sandmann, because he wore a MAGA hat; was the victim of an activist set-up, was pilloried by a dishonest, biased, and complicit media; and is now making that same media pay through their collective noses.

The article implies that Eric Trump is on the verge of being indicted:

Eric Trump, the president's son and an executive vice president of the Trump Organization. It was reported this week that the New York attorney general's office had asked a judge to order Eric Trump to submit to questioning under oath.

What it fails to mention is that the New York attorney general is a highly politicized leftist who uses her office to attack Trump and anyone associated with him or with the Republican party. Indeed, she just filed a suit seeking to dissolve the NRA.

All of the above are actively false or impliedly false statements.  Ironically, there was one person on the list who did not deserve to be at the convention, and, indeed, the Republicans removed her from the roster when they learned about her unsavory beliefs.  That is Mary Ann Mendoza, who supports a border wall because an illegal alien (or, as the Times says, "an undocumented immigrant") killed her son in a car crash.

The Times tried to tie Mendoza to Steve Bannon, which is stupid.  Her real sin is that she is an anti-Semite — and the Republicans instantly dropped her upon learning this.

The Democrats don't drop anti-Semites.  Instead, they have them speak at their convention, as they did with open anti-Semite Linda Sarsour.  Biden disavowed her, only to have his campaign apologize for that disavowal.  Nor have the Democrats disavowed Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, the Black Lives Matter movement, Al Sharpton, or any of the other anti-Semites at the heart of the party.  (Recall that when the Democrats were forced to address Omar's anti-Semitism, the best they could do was come up with an insipid statement condemning all sorts of bad thoughts.)

Trump is right.  Our mainstream media outlets are not about the news.  They're not even about being honestly partisan.  They are, instead, blatantly dishonest Democrat party propaganda outlets.