Chicago's mayor makes it clear some animals are more equal than others

In Animal Farm, George Orwell coined the perfect phrase for any socialist society: "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."  Without exception, all socialist societies have eventually created (to use the Soviet term) a "nomenklatura" — that is, an elite class of high political officials who get special treatment, especially in the realm of material goods denied to other citizens.  With her ukase against protesting around her house, Chicago's Lori Lightfoot seems to have taken Orwell's dictum to heart with a vengeance.

We all remember back in April when Lori Lightfoot violated her super-strict lockdown rules so that she could get a haircut.  When Chicago's ungroomed people and their unemployed hairstylists objected, Lightfoot had an answer: she was special.

That's not even an exaggeration.  At a press conference, Lightfoot stated:

I'm the public face of this city. I'm on national media, and I'm out in the public eye. I'm a person who, I take my personal hygiene very seriously, as I said I felt like I needed to have a haircut. I'm not able to do that myself.

Those other animals in Chicago, the ones who also took their "personal hygiene very seriously," simply weren't equal enough to act upon that serious concern.

This week, Lightfoot again set herself apart from the unhygienic masses over whom she wields her mayoral power.  I've written already about the latest threatening BLM and Antifa tactic, which is to terrorize neighborhoods, so I won't belabor that point here.  Suffice to say that while Lightfoot generally believes in free speech for the Democrats' terrorist branches, and has done little to nothing to protect Chicagoans from rioters, it's different when it's about her:

Mayor Lori Lightfoot defended the Chicago Police Department's ban on protesters being able to demonstrate on the block where she lives, telling reporters Thursday that she and her family at times require heightened security because of threats she receives daily.

Lightfoot refused to elaborate on the specific threats, but said she receives them daily against herself, her wife and her home. Comparisons to how the Police Department has protected previous mayors' homes, such as Rahm Emanuel's Ravenswood residence, are unfair because "this is a different time like no other," Lightfoot told reporters.

"I think that residents of this city, understanding the nature of the threats that we are receiving on a daily basis, on a daily basis, understand I have a right to make sure that my home is secure," Lightfoot said.

To her credit, Lightfoot has not gotten on board with the "defund the police" madness (although she frames it in racial terms), so she's not a hypocrite along those lines.  However, as noted above, she has been less aggressive in preventing BLM's and Antifa's terrorist behavior elsewhere in Chicago.

On August 10, Chicago was overtaken by looters who destroyed people's livelihoods.  She's also been singularly ineffective when it comes to protecting Chicago's citizens from violence.  On June 8, the Chicago Sun-Times wrote about 18 murders in 24 hours, an occurrence the paper described as "the most violent day in 60 years in Chicago."  Just two days ago, 21 people were shot in Chicago, and that followed 15 people being shot on Tuesday, 21 people being shot on Monday, and 64 people being shot over the weekend.

One has to give Lightfoot points for her honesty: she's not shy about letting her citizens know that she matters more than they do.  At a certain point, you can't even blame her for this.  After all, Chicago citizens, like urban residents over large parts of America, keep promoting open hypocrites like Lightfoot to positions of power.  If the voters don't care that they're turning themselves into second-class animals, why should the politicians be shy about showing off their first-class-animal status?

Image: Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot (cropped) by Smart Chicago Collaborative's Photostream, CC BY 2.0.

In Animal Farm, George Orwell coined the perfect phrase for any socialist society: "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."  Without exception, all socialist societies have eventually created (to use the Soviet term) a "nomenklatura" — that is, an elite class of high political officials who get special treatment, especially in the realm of material goods denied to other citizens.  With her ukase against protesting around her house, Chicago's Lori Lightfoot seems to have taken Orwell's dictum to heart with a vengeance.

We all remember back in April when Lori Lightfoot violated her super-strict lockdown rules so that she could get a haircut.  When Chicago's ungroomed people and their unemployed hairstylists objected, Lightfoot had an answer: she was special.

That's not even an exaggeration.  At a press conference, Lightfoot stated:

I'm the public face of this city. I'm on national media, and I'm out in the public eye. I'm a person who, I take my personal hygiene very seriously, as I said I felt like I needed to have a haircut. I'm not able to do that myself.

Those other animals in Chicago, the ones who also took their "personal hygiene very seriously," simply weren't equal enough to act upon that serious concern.

This week, Lightfoot again set herself apart from the unhygienic masses over whom she wields her mayoral power.  I've written already about the latest threatening BLM and Antifa tactic, which is to terrorize neighborhoods, so I won't belabor that point here.  Suffice to say that while Lightfoot generally believes in free speech for the Democrats' terrorist branches, and has done little to nothing to protect Chicagoans from rioters, it's different when it's about her:

Mayor Lori Lightfoot defended the Chicago Police Department's ban on protesters being able to demonstrate on the block where she lives, telling reporters Thursday that she and her family at times require heightened security because of threats she receives daily.

Lightfoot refused to elaborate on the specific threats, but said she receives them daily against herself, her wife and her home. Comparisons to how the Police Department has protected previous mayors' homes, such as Rahm Emanuel's Ravenswood residence, are unfair because "this is a different time like no other," Lightfoot told reporters.

"I think that residents of this city, understanding the nature of the threats that we are receiving on a daily basis, on a daily basis, understand I have a right to make sure that my home is secure," Lightfoot said.

To her credit, Lightfoot has not gotten on board with the "defund the police" madness (although she frames it in racial terms), so she's not a hypocrite along those lines.  However, as noted above, she has been less aggressive in preventing BLM's and Antifa's terrorist behavior elsewhere in Chicago.

On August 10, Chicago was overtaken by looters who destroyed people's livelihoods.  She's also been singularly ineffective when it comes to protecting Chicago's citizens from violence.  On June 8, the Chicago Sun-Times wrote about 18 murders in 24 hours, an occurrence the paper described as "the most violent day in 60 years in Chicago."  Just two days ago, 21 people were shot in Chicago, and that followed 15 people being shot on Tuesday, 21 people being shot on Monday, and 64 people being shot over the weekend.

One has to give Lightfoot points for her honesty: she's not shy about letting her citizens know that she matters more than they do.  At a certain point, you can't even blame her for this.  After all, Chicago citizens, like urban residents over large parts of America, keep promoting open hypocrites like Lightfoot to positions of power.  If the voters don't care that they're turning themselves into second-class animals, why should the politicians be shy about showing off their first-class-animal status?

Image: Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot (cropped) by Smart Chicago Collaborative's Photostream, CC BY 2.0.