Why is the US Army calling its commander in chief's campaign slogan 'white supremacist'?

After a slew of pieties from the U.S. Army generals about the importance of the military being all non-partisan — remember the general who apologized for accompanying commander-in-chief President Trump to a looted, burned church last June? — what goes on on the inside is a heckuva different story.

According to Military.com:

The Army has pulled a handout meant to promote meetings on diversity in the ranks that lists President Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" slogan as a possible indicator of covert white supremacist sympathies.

In a statement late Wednesday, the Army said that the flyer distributed to troops and contractors at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama was sent out in error, and an Article 15-6 fact-finding investigation had begun to determine how it happened.

...and...

The material was meant to promote meetings at Redstone Arsenal as part of the Army's "Project Inclusion," an effort by Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy and Army Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph McConville "to improve diversity, equity and inclusion across the force and build cohesive teams."

Project Inclusion involved listening sessions at bases worldwide for troops and civilians on issues such as racial disparities and the Army's move in August to remove photos from officers' promotion boards, according to the service.

The promotional material, sent in emails, included an illustration of a pyramid of phrases labeled "Things To Think About."

Yeah, we're thinking.  We're thinking about what a mess the U.S. military has become that it could be so disrespectful of its commander-in-chief and the 63 million Americans who voted for President Trump.

The chairman of the joint chiefs of staff made an abject apology for walking with President Trump to Lafayette Park and its burned church, with "I should not have been there.  My presence in that moment, and in that environment, created the perception of the military involved in domestic politics."

What the heck does he call this?

We already know that the Pentagon's sanctimonious leadership is full of wokesters.  President Obama purged officers deemed not politically woke enough to him and seeded the flag ranks with his loyalists.  The rot now seems to extend through the ranks.  Because, seriously, who would put out something like this without thinking about the potential for disrespecting one's co-workers, one's commander-in-chief, and decent people everywhere by labeling them "white supremacists" for disagreeing with socialism?  Decent people don't do that.  Decent people know how to keep politics out of whatever project they're doing in a professional setting.  It's not that hard.  But not for this crew, which must have been steeped in a groupthink culture of Trump-hate and decided it could take the power to project it.  And yet still, anyone sane would have not done this even if for self-preservation's sake.  What glee could be worth the little thrill some creep got from sneaking in President Trump's campaign slogan into the list of racist no-nos, despite the many black and brown people who are President Trump's supporters?  Except that it wasn't just slipped in; multiple people would have seen it before it went to press, suggesting a full blown culture of corruption.

Rep. Al Brooks, an Alabama Republican, views the issue as a matter of violated law and thinks it should be prosecuted under the Hatch Act, which prohibits campaigning and making political statements on the government dime.

He might be right, but it could be more trouble than it's worth, because this wasn't just a little grunt doing this; it was a whole unit — one that now needs to be disbanded, or at least see its leadership replaced.

It highlights the dangerous wokesterism infiltrating the military, coupled with an amazingly brazen disrespect for the commander-in-chief.  We're seeing lots of hints of it all around the perimeter — the military's resistance to ending transgender soldiers, who require significant medical care and are disruptive to military order, to the naval commander who took his COVID worries aboard a ship at sea to the press instead of up his chain of command, informing the enemy; the coddling of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who committed quite a few irregularities at the National Security Council and then attempted to unseat President Trump with the help of the partisan Democrats; and the military's resistance to putting down civil unrest engulfing America's cities, raising questions about what it was good for if it couldn't bring itself to put a stop to a bona fide internal threat.  Protecting Afghanis?  Color us unimpressed.

It sounds as though the U.S. Army is becoming a Latin American–style military now, where professionalism is secondary, political loyalty is primary, and gangsterism is the logical outcome.  This happened in Venezuela, by the way, as Hugo Chávez was rising through the ranks.  Eventually, a leftist culture ended up putting political loyalty first and foremost and looked the other way as the army morphed into a drug-dealing operation.  And yes, as with the U.S. Army, it was all in a rabidly leftist direction.  Leftists, see, like power.

As Brooks said, "heads need to roll."  This needs to be done on the double. 

Image credit: Jeremiah Schultz via Flickr, public domain.

After a slew of pieties from the U.S. Army generals about the importance of the military being all non-partisan — remember the general who apologized for accompanying commander-in-chief President Trump to a looted, burned church last June? — what goes on on the inside is a heckuva different story.

According to Military.com:

The Army has pulled a handout meant to promote meetings on diversity in the ranks that lists President Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" slogan as a possible indicator of covert white supremacist sympathies.

In a statement late Wednesday, the Army said that the flyer distributed to troops and contractors at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama was sent out in error, and an Article 15-6 fact-finding investigation had begun to determine how it happened.

...and...

The material was meant to promote meetings at Redstone Arsenal as part of the Army's "Project Inclusion," an effort by Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy and Army Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph McConville "to improve diversity, equity and inclusion across the force and build cohesive teams."

Project Inclusion involved listening sessions at bases worldwide for troops and civilians on issues such as racial disparities and the Army's move in August to remove photos from officers' promotion boards, according to the service.

The promotional material, sent in emails, included an illustration of a pyramid of phrases labeled "Things To Think About."

Yeah, we're thinking.  We're thinking about what a mess the U.S. military has become that it could be so disrespectful of its commander-in-chief and the 63 million Americans who voted for President Trump.

The chairman of the joint chiefs of staff made an abject apology for walking with President Trump to Lafayette Park and its burned church, with "I should not have been there.  My presence in that moment, and in that environment, created the perception of the military involved in domestic politics."

What the heck does he call this?

We already know that the Pentagon's sanctimonious leadership is full of wokesters.  President Obama purged officers deemed not politically woke enough to him and seeded the flag ranks with his loyalists.  The rot now seems to extend through the ranks.  Because, seriously, who would put out something like this without thinking about the potential for disrespecting one's co-workers, one's commander-in-chief, and decent people everywhere by labeling them "white supremacists" for disagreeing with socialism?  Decent people don't do that.  Decent people know how to keep politics out of whatever project they're doing in a professional setting.  It's not that hard.  But not for this crew, which must have been steeped in a groupthink culture of Trump-hate and decided it could take the power to project it.  And yet still, anyone sane would have not done this even if for self-preservation's sake.  What glee could be worth the little thrill some creep got from sneaking in President Trump's campaign slogan into the list of racist no-nos, despite the many black and brown people who are President Trump's supporters?  Except that it wasn't just slipped in; multiple people would have seen it before it went to press, suggesting a full blown culture of corruption.

Rep. Al Brooks, an Alabama Republican, views the issue as a matter of violated law and thinks it should be prosecuted under the Hatch Act, which prohibits campaigning and making political statements on the government dime.

He might be right, but it could be more trouble than it's worth, because this wasn't just a little grunt doing this; it was a whole unit — one that now needs to be disbanded, or at least see its leadership replaced.

It highlights the dangerous wokesterism infiltrating the military, coupled with an amazingly brazen disrespect for the commander-in-chief.  We're seeing lots of hints of it all around the perimeter — the military's resistance to ending transgender soldiers, who require significant medical care and are disruptive to military order, to the naval commander who took his COVID worries aboard a ship at sea to the press instead of up his chain of command, informing the enemy; the coddling of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who committed quite a few irregularities at the National Security Council and then attempted to unseat President Trump with the help of the partisan Democrats; and the military's resistance to putting down civil unrest engulfing America's cities, raising questions about what it was good for if it couldn't bring itself to put a stop to a bona fide internal threat.  Protecting Afghanis?  Color us unimpressed.

It sounds as though the U.S. Army is becoming a Latin American–style military now, where professionalism is secondary, political loyalty is primary, and gangsterism is the logical outcome.  This happened in Venezuela, by the way, as Hugo Chávez was rising through the ranks.  Eventually, a leftist culture ended up putting political loyalty first and foremost and looked the other way as the army morphed into a drug-dealing operation.  And yes, as with the U.S. Army, it was all in a rabidly leftist direction.  Leftists, see, like power.

As Brooks said, "heads need to roll."  This needs to be done on the double. 

Image credit: Jeremiah Schultz via Flickr, public domain.