The Times’s series about failed public schools may be on to something

The New York Times is out with a new podcast series entitled “Nice White Parents.” The title is offensive and seems to be part and parcel of the Times’s general habit of smearing low-melanin people. However, if you listen to the podcast, what you learn is that the real malfeasors aren’t white people; instead, they are a specific type of white progressive who preaches one thing and practices another.

On Thursday, the Times proudly promoted a “new limited series about building a better school system, and what gets in the way.” The short introductory text is blunt: The problem with quality minority education is white people:

We know that American public schools do not guarantee each child an equal education — two decades of school reform initiatives have not changed that. But when we look at how our schools are failing, we usually focus on who they’re failing: Black and brown kids. We ask: Why aren’t they performing better? Why aren’t they achieving more?

Those are not the right questions.

If you want to understand what’s wrong with our public education system, you have to look at what is arguably the most powerful force in our schools: White parents.

That’s a pretty strong indictment of an entire race and is offensive. Fortunately, I put my being offense aside and listened to the short audio that introduces the series. It was eye-opening. If the entire series is like this introduction, the show’s reporter, Chana Joffe Walt, won’t be indicting “nice white people.” She’ll be indicting virtue-signaling white progressives.

Joffe-Walt opens with an anecdote that is a microcosm of everything that’s wrong with a specific type of urban and suburban American school system. She begins in 1963, less than a decade after the Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education, holding that segregated schools were unconstitutional. That year, New York decided to build a new school in a predominantly black and Puerto Rican neighborhood.

White parents near that neighborhood, however, sent multiple letters to the city, insisting that the school should be closer to their community. In that way, they argued, the school would naturally be segregated, with white, black, and brown children all learning together.

Joffe-Walt quotes a letter that sees the author objecting to a future in which the community’s children end up as part of some “small, white, middle-income clique.” The Board of Education agreed with these pleas and relocated the school building to accommodate the white parents’ requests.

It took several more years before the school finally opened. When it did, not one of the letter writers sent his or her children there. Joffe-Walt reached out to all the letter writers she could locate. Here’s are the ones she quotes in the podcast’s introductory episode:

“I remember thinking very clearly that, ‘Okay, I believe in this, but I don’t sort of want to sacrifice my children to it.’”

“No, as I said, I’m a Quaker, and so my kids went to the Quaker school. [Snip.] Because I believed in it but, um. . . .”

“And I think we say a lot of things that are politically correct without even realizing that we are not telling exactly how we feel.”

That short narrative leads Joffe-Walt to conclude that “nice white parents” are the real curse of the public school system, a premise she promises to prove in her series. As it happens, she’s almost right.

Those New York parents Joffe-Walt describes are the predecessors of today’s leftist virtue signalers: They have two moral standards, one of which is what they aggressively push for in the public sphere, and the other of which is what they apply to themselves.

These white progressives are hypocritical bombasts. They are not concerned with the actual well-being of the minority families they’re bossing around. All they care about is that they look good in the eyes of their fellow white leftists.

Another version of this problem is the cohort of wealthy suburban parents who have pursued lives entirely in line with the recipe for acquiring wealth in America: They got educated, got jobs, got married, had children, and stayed married, in that order.

What’s fascinating about these same people is that they insist that their school districts must not tell students, including minority students, about this surefire path to making it in America. To do so, they say, is racist because it imposes “white” values on minorities – as if enlightened self-interest is beyond minorities. The white progressives’ horror of racism ensures that progressive whites never tell minorities something that will result in their competing with whites in the job market for affluent people.

It will be interesting to see where Joffe-Walt goes with this podcast, which premiers on July 30. The one thing I can guarantee, though, is that every one of those “nice white parents” to whom she refers is, in fact, a hard-left, affluent white parent, hellbent on top-dollar virtue-signaling at the expense of minority children.

Image: YouTube screengrab

The New York Times is out with a new podcast series entitled “Nice White Parents.” The title is offensive and seems to be part and parcel of the Times’s general habit of smearing low-melanin people. However, if you listen to the podcast, what you learn is that the real malfeasors aren’t white people; instead, they are a specific type of white progressive who preaches one thing and practices another.

On Thursday, the Times proudly promoted a “new limited series about building a better school system, and what gets in the way.” The short introductory text is blunt: The problem with quality minority education is white people:

We know that American public schools do not guarantee each child an equal education — two decades of school reform initiatives have not changed that. But when we look at how our schools are failing, we usually focus on who they’re failing: Black and brown kids. We ask: Why aren’t they performing better? Why aren’t they achieving more?

Those are not the right questions.

If you want to understand what’s wrong with our public education system, you have to look at what is arguably the most powerful force in our schools: White parents.

That’s a pretty strong indictment of an entire race and is offensive. Fortunately, I put my being offense aside and listened to the short audio that introduces the series. It was eye-opening. If the entire series is like this introduction, the show’s reporter, Chana Joffe Walt, won’t be indicting “nice white people.” She’ll be indicting virtue-signaling white progressives.

Joffe-Walt opens with an anecdote that is a microcosm of everything that’s wrong with a specific type of urban and suburban American school system. She begins in 1963, less than a decade after the Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education, holding that segregated schools were unconstitutional. That year, New York decided to build a new school in a predominantly black and Puerto Rican neighborhood.

White parents near that neighborhood, however, sent multiple letters to the city, insisting that the school should be closer to their community. In that way, they argued, the school would naturally be segregated, with white, black, and brown children all learning together.

Joffe-Walt quotes a letter that sees the author objecting to a future in which the community’s children end up as part of some “small, white, middle-income clique.” The Board of Education agreed with these pleas and relocated the school building to accommodate the white parents’ requests.

It took several more years before the school finally opened. When it did, not one of the letter writers sent his or her children there. Joffe-Walt reached out to all the letter writers she could locate. Here’s are the ones she quotes in the podcast’s introductory episode:

“I remember thinking very clearly that, ‘Okay, I believe in this, but I don’t sort of want to sacrifice my children to it.’”

“No, as I said, I’m a Quaker, and so my kids went to the Quaker school. [Snip.] Because I believed in it but, um. . . .”

“And I think we say a lot of things that are politically correct without even realizing that we are not telling exactly how we feel.”

That short narrative leads Joffe-Walt to conclude that “nice white parents” are the real curse of the public school system, a premise she promises to prove in her series. As it happens, she’s almost right.

Those New York parents Joffe-Walt describes are the predecessors of today’s leftist virtue signalers: They have two moral standards, one of which is what they aggressively push for in the public sphere, and the other of which is what they apply to themselves.

These white progressives are hypocritical bombasts. They are not concerned with the actual well-being of the minority families they’re bossing around. All they care about is that they look good in the eyes of their fellow white leftists.

Another version of this problem is the cohort of wealthy suburban parents who have pursued lives entirely in line with the recipe for acquiring wealth in America: They got educated, got jobs, got married, had children, and stayed married, in that order.

What’s fascinating about these same people is that they insist that their school districts must not tell students, including minority students, about this surefire path to making it in America. To do so, they say, is racist because it imposes “white” values on minorities – as if enlightened self-interest is beyond minorities. The white progressives’ horror of racism ensures that progressive whites never tell minorities something that will result in their competing with whites in the job market for affluent people.

It will be interesting to see where Joffe-Walt goes with this podcast, which premiers on July 30. The one thing I can guarantee, though, is that every one of those “nice white parents” to whom she refers is, in fact, a hard-left, affluent white parent, hellbent on top-dollar virtue-signaling at the expense of minority children.

Image: YouTube screengrab