The New York Times is worried about Gen Z, Millennials, and abortion

Earlier this week, the New York Times wrote an article that arguably deserves two separate posts because it raises two issues regarding abortion.  The first is the Times' concern that younger women — Gen Z and Millennials — don't care much about the abortion question.  The second is the staggering cognitive dissonance that the article shows about black lives and abortion.

At the initial, substantive level, the Times is worried that today's young women are lukewarm about abortion.  The article begins with Brea Baker, a 26-year-old black-identifying woman, who says abortion is less important to her life than other issues:

Like many young Americans, Brea Baker experienced her first moment of political outrage after the killing of a Black man. She was 18 when Trayvon Martin was shot. When she saw his photo on the news, she thought of her younger brother, and the boundary between her politics and her sense of survival collapsed.

In college she volunteered for the N.A.A.C.P. and as a national organizer for the Women's March. But when conversations among campus activists turned to abortion access, she didn't feel the same sense of personal rage.

"A lot of the language I heard was about protecting Roe v. Wade," Ms. Baker, 26, said. "It felt grounded in the '70s feminist movement ...

[snip]

"It's not that young people don't care about abortion, it's that they don't think it applies to them," she said. Language about "protecting Roe" feels "antiquated," she added. "If I'm a high school student who got activated by March for Our Lives, I'm not hip to Supreme Court cases that happened before my time."

Other women seem equally uninspired by the abortion battle:

Interviews with more than a dozen young women who have taken to the streets for racial justice in recent weeks, though, reflected some ambivalence about their role in the movement for reproductive rights.

These young women recognized that while some American women can now gain easy access to abortion, millions more cannot; at least five states have only one abortion clinic.

But some, raised in a post-Roe world, do not feel the same urgency toward abortion as they do for other social justice causes; others want to ensure that the fight is broadly defined, with an emphasis on racial disparities in reproductive health.

Members of Gen Z and millennials are more progressive than older generations; they've also been politically active, whether organizing a global climate strike or mass marches against gun violence in schools.

While Gen Z women ranked abortion as very important to them in a 2019 survey from Ignite, a nonpartisan group focused on young women's political education, mass shootings, climate change, education and racial inequality all edged it out.

Even as young women on the left are less engaged with abortion, the Times notes that young conservatives care deeply about the issue:

On the right, meanwhile, researchers say that opposition to abortion has become more central to young people's political beliefs.

The information in this article must be terrifying for Democrats.  For decades, two things have kept the Democrat party going: black voters and women who are single-issue voters, with abortion being that single issue.  With increasing numbers of blacks peeling off to support Trump, Democrats cannot afford to lose their dependable abortion warriors — yet young women don't care.

So that's the gist of the article.  And now to the cognitive dissonance, which is summed up in a couple of sentences I skipped from the initial quote, above.  Here's what Brea Baker said in full (emphasis mine):

"A lot of the language I heard was about protecting Roe v. Wade," Ms. Baker, 26, said. "It felt grounded in the '70s feminist movement. And it felt like, I can't focus on abortion access if my people are dying. The narrative around abortion access wasn't made for people from the hood."

Indeed, the Times found this language so pivotal it turned it into the article's title:

If we're going to talk about black people dying, we cannot ignore that while blacks are approximately 13% of the American population, they account for an average of 36% of American abortions.  In 2015, black women aborted 121,829 babies.  Since 1973, well over 15 million black babies have been killed because of abortion.

Those babies are black lives, but they don't matter to the Democrat party.  Pandering to the abortion crowd — and promising young Democrats a lifetime of easy sex without babies — has always been more important than those millions of tiny black lives.

For both the Times and Ms. Baker to think they're making sense with the statement "I can't focus on abortion access if my people are dying" perfectly exemplifies the insanity that is leftism.

Image: New York Times screen grab (for editorial purposes.

Earlier this week, the New York Times wrote an article that arguably deserves two separate posts because it raises two issues regarding abortion.  The first is the Times' concern that younger women — Gen Z and Millennials — don't care much about the abortion question.  The second is the staggering cognitive dissonance that the article shows about black lives and abortion.

At the initial, substantive level, the Times is worried that today's young women are lukewarm about abortion.  The article begins with Brea Baker, a 26-year-old black-identifying woman, who says abortion is less important to her life than other issues:

Like many young Americans, Brea Baker experienced her first moment of political outrage after the killing of a Black man. She was 18 when Trayvon Martin was shot. When she saw his photo on the news, she thought of her younger brother, and the boundary between her politics and her sense of survival collapsed.

In college she volunteered for the N.A.A.C.P. and as a national organizer for the Women's March. But when conversations among campus activists turned to abortion access, she didn't feel the same sense of personal rage.

"A lot of the language I heard was about protecting Roe v. Wade," Ms. Baker, 26, said. "It felt grounded in the '70s feminist movement ...

[snip]

"It's not that young people don't care about abortion, it's that they don't think it applies to them," she said. Language about "protecting Roe" feels "antiquated," she added. "If I'm a high school student who got activated by March for Our Lives, I'm not hip to Supreme Court cases that happened before my time."

Other women seem equally uninspired by the abortion battle:

Interviews with more than a dozen young women who have taken to the streets for racial justice in recent weeks, though, reflected some ambivalence about their role in the movement for reproductive rights.

These young women recognized that while some American women can now gain easy access to abortion, millions more cannot; at least five states have only one abortion clinic.

But some, raised in a post-Roe world, do not feel the same urgency toward abortion as they do for other social justice causes; others want to ensure that the fight is broadly defined, with an emphasis on racial disparities in reproductive health.

Members of Gen Z and millennials are more progressive than older generations; they've also been politically active, whether organizing a global climate strike or mass marches against gun violence in schools.

While Gen Z women ranked abortion as very important to them in a 2019 survey from Ignite, a nonpartisan group focused on young women's political education, mass shootings, climate change, education and racial inequality all edged it out.

Even as young women on the left are less engaged with abortion, the Times notes that young conservatives care deeply about the issue:

On the right, meanwhile, researchers say that opposition to abortion has become more central to young people's political beliefs.

The information in this article must be terrifying for Democrats.  For decades, two things have kept the Democrat party going: black voters and women who are single-issue voters, with abortion being that single issue.  With increasing numbers of blacks peeling off to support Trump, Democrats cannot afford to lose their dependable abortion warriors — yet young women don't care.

So that's the gist of the article.  And now to the cognitive dissonance, which is summed up in a couple of sentences I skipped from the initial quote, above.  Here's what Brea Baker said in full (emphasis mine):

"A lot of the language I heard was about protecting Roe v. Wade," Ms. Baker, 26, said. "It felt grounded in the '70s feminist movement. And it felt like, I can't focus on abortion access if my people are dying. The narrative around abortion access wasn't made for people from the hood."

Indeed, the Times found this language so pivotal it turned it into the article's title:

If we're going to talk about black people dying, we cannot ignore that while blacks are approximately 13% of the American population, they account for an average of 36% of American abortions.  In 2015, black women aborted 121,829 babies.  Since 1973, well over 15 million black babies have been killed because of abortion.

Those babies are black lives, but they don't matter to the Democrat party.  Pandering to the abortion crowd — and promising young Democrats a lifetime of easy sex without babies — has always been more important than those millions of tiny black lives.

For both the Times and Ms. Baker to think they're making sense with the statement "I can't focus on abortion access if my people are dying" perfectly exemplifies the insanity that is leftism.

Image: New York Times screen grab (for editorial purposes.