Cancel culture hits Planned Parenthood

The founder of Planned Parenthood has been canceled.  Planned Parenthood of Greater New York, an affiliate of the nation's largest abortion corporation, announced it is removing the name of Margaret Sanger due to her "harmful connection to the eugenics movement."  Disavowing Sanger comes decades too late, considering that everyone familiar with her notorious history is well aware of Sanger's blatant racism.  Given that the Black Lives Matter doctrine has been pushed to the forefront of American politics, Sanger's racist business model of exterminating the black race from American society has now been called out by hundreds of Planned Parenthood employees, donors, and volunteers, demanding she be renounced.  It's ironic that the woman responsible for almost 45 years of infant genocide in America and hailed as a feminist hero is now a victim of America's raging cancel culture.

Margaret Sanger was born in 1879 into a poverty-stricken family in New York.  She was one of 11 children, and although her mother died at an early age of tuberculosis, Sanger blamed her mother's death on bearing too many children.  As an adult, Sanger fiercely promoted her belief of small families and encouraged women to limit their number of pregnancies.  Trained as a nurse and shortly after joining the Women's Committee of the New York Socialist's Party, Sanger worked as a nurse in New York City's poor immigrant slums, teaching women about birth control.  Sanger became a prolific writer, penning and self-publishing brochures and pamphlets, advocating for the use of birth control.

After the threat of arrest for violating morality laws under the Comstock Act, Sanger fled to England and returned to the U.S. a year later.  She was arrested upon her return and spent 30 days in jail.  Appealing to a sympathetic judge, her conviction was not overturned; however, her sentence was commuted, and she was released.  The judge in her case agreed to allow licensed medical doctors to prescribe contraceptives.  Sanger continued to write and edit her seminal, 5,000-page (plus) publication, The Birth Control Review, focusing on birth control advocacy.  By 1921, Sanger had established the American Birth Control league, which would later be renamed Planned Parenthood.

Margaret Sanger not only became the voice for birth control in the U.S., enabling the legislation of birth control mandates, but openly promoted the eugenics ideology and frequently gave speeches, discussing the proposal of eliminating unwanted people.  Like Adolf Hitler, Sanger believed in a master race society in which only the genetically pure should be allowed to live.  She openly associated with racists and anti-Semites and routinely attacked the Catholic Church for its anti-contraception stance.  Not only did she give numerous speeches on the subject of eugenics, but she chronicled those beliefs in two brazenly racist articles: "The Eugenic Control of Birth Control Propaganda" and "Birth Control and Racial Betterment."  Not surprisingly, Sanger spoke to a KKK women's gathering in 1926, using the word "degenerates" to describe the "lesser humans" in American society, while endorsing the sterilization of the disabled and the intellectually challenged. 

For decades, Planned Parenthood has bestowed its annual Margaret Sanger award upon selectees for their leadership, excellence, and contribution to women's reproductive health — garbled terms for women who support abortion on demand.  Hillary Clinton and Nancy Pelosi are recipients of this award, neither awardee having ever acknowledged Sanger's despicable racist ideology, nor will either woman speak to the fact that a majority of Planned Parenthood abortion facilities are strategically located in minority neighborhoods, where black infant genocide is rampant.  Now that Sanger is canceled, will they return the award?

Finally, while pro-life activists have pointed out Sanger's rabid racism for decades, it became difficult for the Planned Parenthood organization to ignore it.  Along with acknowledging the ugly truth, Karen Seltzer; chair of the PP board affiliate, added, "The removal of Margaret Sanger's name from our building is both a necessary and overdue step to reckon with our legacy and acknowledge Planned Parenthood's contributions to historical reproductive harm within communities of color."  Punctuating Seltzer's admission, Reverend Dean Nelson, executive director of Human Coalition Action and a black American minister, stated, "The decision is long overdue," adding, "More action is needed."  Dean called for the defunding of Planned Parenthood, in addition to closing Planned Parenthood abortion mills in minority neighborhoods.  If Planned Parenthood can reject its founder's racist and eugenic beliefs, perhaps the organization will someday reject abortion altogether. 

The founder of Planned Parenthood has been canceled.  Planned Parenthood of Greater New York, an affiliate of the nation's largest abortion corporation, announced it is removing the name of Margaret Sanger due to her "harmful connection to the eugenics movement."  Disavowing Sanger comes decades too late, considering that everyone familiar with her notorious history is well aware of Sanger's blatant racism.  Given that the Black Lives Matter doctrine has been pushed to the forefront of American politics, Sanger's racist business model of exterminating the black race from American society has now been called out by hundreds of Planned Parenthood employees, donors, and volunteers, demanding she be renounced.  It's ironic that the woman responsible for almost 45 years of infant genocide in America and hailed as a feminist hero is now a victim of America's raging cancel culture.

Margaret Sanger was born in 1879 into a poverty-stricken family in New York.  She was one of 11 children, and although her mother died at an early age of tuberculosis, Sanger blamed her mother's death on bearing too many children.  As an adult, Sanger fiercely promoted her belief of small families and encouraged women to limit their number of pregnancies.  Trained as a nurse and shortly after joining the Women's Committee of the New York Socialist's Party, Sanger worked as a nurse in New York City's poor immigrant slums, teaching women about birth control.  Sanger became a prolific writer, penning and self-publishing brochures and pamphlets, advocating for the use of birth control.

After the threat of arrest for violating morality laws under the Comstock Act, Sanger fled to England and returned to the U.S. a year later.  She was arrested upon her return and spent 30 days in jail.  Appealing to a sympathetic judge, her conviction was not overturned; however, her sentence was commuted, and she was released.  The judge in her case agreed to allow licensed medical doctors to prescribe contraceptives.  Sanger continued to write and edit her seminal, 5,000-page (plus) publication, The Birth Control Review, focusing on birth control advocacy.  By 1921, Sanger had established the American Birth Control league, which would later be renamed Planned Parenthood.

Margaret Sanger not only became the voice for birth control in the U.S., enabling the legislation of birth control mandates, but openly promoted the eugenics ideology and frequently gave speeches, discussing the proposal of eliminating unwanted people.  Like Adolf Hitler, Sanger believed in a master race society in which only the genetically pure should be allowed to live.  She openly associated with racists and anti-Semites and routinely attacked the Catholic Church for its anti-contraception stance.  Not only did she give numerous speeches on the subject of eugenics, but she chronicled those beliefs in two brazenly racist articles: "The Eugenic Control of Birth Control Propaganda" and "Birth Control and Racial Betterment."  Not surprisingly, Sanger spoke to a KKK women's gathering in 1926, using the word "degenerates" to describe the "lesser humans" in American society, while endorsing the sterilization of the disabled and the intellectually challenged. 

For decades, Planned Parenthood has bestowed its annual Margaret Sanger award upon selectees for their leadership, excellence, and contribution to women's reproductive health — garbled terms for women who support abortion on demand.  Hillary Clinton and Nancy Pelosi are recipients of this award, neither awardee having ever acknowledged Sanger's despicable racist ideology, nor will either woman speak to the fact that a majority of Planned Parenthood abortion facilities are strategically located in minority neighborhoods, where black infant genocide is rampant.  Now that Sanger is canceled, will they return the award?

Finally, while pro-life activists have pointed out Sanger's rabid racism for decades, it became difficult for the Planned Parenthood organization to ignore it.  Along with acknowledging the ugly truth, Karen Seltzer; chair of the PP board affiliate, added, "The removal of Margaret Sanger's name from our building is both a necessary and overdue step to reckon with our legacy and acknowledge Planned Parenthood's contributions to historical reproductive harm within communities of color."  Punctuating Seltzer's admission, Reverend Dean Nelson, executive director of Human Coalition Action and a black American minister, stated, "The decision is long overdue," adding, "More action is needed."  Dean called for the defunding of Planned Parenthood, in addition to closing Planned Parenthood abortion mills in minority neighborhoods.  If Planned Parenthood can reject its founder's racist and eugenic beliefs, perhaps the organization will someday reject abortion altogether.