Tucker Carlson warns us that the monument attacks aren't just leftist theater

Tucker Carlson is currently the most watched news commentator in America and for good reason.  Unlike most people, Republicans as well as Democrats, Carlson will not let political correctness, virtue-signaling, or the fear of cancel culture silence him.

Instead, night after night, Carlson talks about what's really happening in American cities, without trying to excuse heinous leftist behavior or diminish its effects on America's long-term health.  Moreover, with each commentary, his voice gets stronger.  What you heard last week from Carlson was good, but what you'll hear this week is even better.

So it was that, on Monday night, Carlson gave what may have been his best monologue yet on the violence and destruction ripping through America.

Although Tucker opens by referring to the mob attack on the Andrew Jackson statue in Lafayette Square, he quickly focuses on something that is, in some ways, even worse than mob action, and that's the way America's institutions are falling in line with the mob.  New York's Museum of Natural History has chosen to remove the statue of President Teddy Roosevelt astride a horse, which has stood in front of the museum since the 1930s.  It's apparently offensive because standing at his side are men representing his explorations in Africa and Latin America.

Carlson argues there's something much deeper going on here.  Teddy Roosevelt, he explains, was a quintessentially American president.  A human dynamo, he represented American initiative, self-discipline, self-improvement, and innovation.  He fought corporate monopolies (which is the last thing today's fascist left wants to do), as well as standing against racism and anti-Semitism.

There is no reason to topple Teddy Roosevelt except for the fact that he is "us."  And that, says Carlson, is the real issue:

Teddy Roosevelt was a hero to millions of Americans. He still is. That's precisely why they are tearing down his statue. They know that if they can force you to watch as they topple your heroes, they have won. There's nothing they can't do next.

After reciting the growing list of statues the left is tearing down, Carlson points out that the new names on the list have something in common: they're not linked to the Confederacy, which was the original excuse the left gave for its mob attack on the public square.

What's really bad is that not only are Democrats okay with destruction, but so are Republicans.  Indeed, Kevin McCarthy, the top House Republican, has been on board with the mob's relentless attack on American symbols.  He and his milquetoasts in Congress apparently hope that if they say nothing, this will all go away:

Elected Republicans, almost all of them, are in no hurry to stop the disorder. They appear to believe what we're watching is a version of the Rodney King riots from 1992. People saw an upsetting video on the internet, they're angry, and that's understandable. But they'll calm down soon, and we can get back to cutting capital gains taxes and sanctioning Bashar al-Assad. That's their view of it.

They are wrong. This is not a momentary civil disturbance. This is a serious and highly organized political movement. It is not superficial. It is deep and profound. It has vast ambitions. It is insidious; it will grow. Its goal is to end liberal democracy and challenge Western civilization itself.

There's more, and you will be doing yourself a favor if you watch it and then share it.  Carlson's conclusion is that, weak as they are, Republicans are the only thing still capable of stopping the complete breakdown of the American system, from the Constitution on down to the picture of Lincoln on the five-dollar bill.

In other words, the brilliant Carlson is saying what I, the sometimes barely coherent Andrea, have said for a long time: in this election, as in no other in our lifetimes, the perfect is most truly the enemy of the good.

Republicans, sadly, are imperfect.  Even the great Trump, whom I would put up there with Reagan, or even higher, is imperfect.  But no matter how much you dislike them, they're all we've got left.  If we refuse to vote for them in November because they fail to live up to our immaculate standards, we have opened the floodgates and will watch leftism irrevocably sweep away the grand American experiment.

Tucker Carlson is currently the most watched news commentator in America and for good reason.  Unlike most people, Republicans as well as Democrats, Carlson will not let political correctness, virtue-signaling, or the fear of cancel culture silence him.

Instead, night after night, Carlson talks about what's really happening in American cities, without trying to excuse heinous leftist behavior or diminish its effects on America's long-term health.  Moreover, with each commentary, his voice gets stronger.  What you heard last week from Carlson was good, but what you'll hear this week is even better.

So it was that, on Monday night, Carlson gave what may have been his best monologue yet on the violence and destruction ripping through America.

Although Tucker opens by referring to the mob attack on the Andrew Jackson statue in Lafayette Square, he quickly focuses on something that is, in some ways, even worse than mob action, and that's the way America's institutions are falling in line with the mob.  New York's Museum of Natural History has chosen to remove the statue of President Teddy Roosevelt astride a horse, which has stood in front of the museum since the 1930s.  It's apparently offensive because standing at his side are men representing his explorations in Africa and Latin America.

Carlson argues there's something much deeper going on here.  Teddy Roosevelt, he explains, was a quintessentially American president.  A human dynamo, he represented American initiative, self-discipline, self-improvement, and innovation.  He fought corporate monopolies (which is the last thing today's fascist left wants to do), as well as standing against racism and anti-Semitism.

There is no reason to topple Teddy Roosevelt except for the fact that he is "us."  And that, says Carlson, is the real issue:

Teddy Roosevelt was a hero to millions of Americans. He still is. That's precisely why they are tearing down his statue. They know that if they can force you to watch as they topple your heroes, they have won. There's nothing they can't do next.

After reciting the growing list of statues the left is tearing down, Carlson points out that the new names on the list have something in common: they're not linked to the Confederacy, which was the original excuse the left gave for its mob attack on the public square.

What's really bad is that not only are Democrats okay with destruction, but so are Republicans.  Indeed, Kevin McCarthy, the top House Republican, has been on board with the mob's relentless attack on American symbols.  He and his milquetoasts in Congress apparently hope that if they say nothing, this will all go away:

Elected Republicans, almost all of them, are in no hurry to stop the disorder. They appear to believe what we're watching is a version of the Rodney King riots from 1992. People saw an upsetting video on the internet, they're angry, and that's understandable. But they'll calm down soon, and we can get back to cutting capital gains taxes and sanctioning Bashar al-Assad. That's their view of it.

They are wrong. This is not a momentary civil disturbance. This is a serious and highly organized political movement. It is not superficial. It is deep and profound. It has vast ambitions. It is insidious; it will grow. Its goal is to end liberal democracy and challenge Western civilization itself.

There's more, and you will be doing yourself a favor if you watch it and then share it.  Carlson's conclusion is that, weak as they are, Republicans are the only thing still capable of stopping the complete breakdown of the American system, from the Constitution on down to the picture of Lincoln on the five-dollar bill.

In other words, the brilliant Carlson is saying what I, the sometimes barely coherent Andrea, have said for a long time: in this election, as in no other in our lifetimes, the perfect is most truly the enemy of the good.

Republicans, sadly, are imperfect.  Even the great Trump, whom I would put up there with Reagan, or even higher, is imperfect.  But no matter how much you dislike them, they're all we've got left.  If we refuse to vote for them in November because they fail to live up to our immaculate standards, we have opened the floodgates and will watch leftism irrevocably sweep away the grand American experiment.