Kamala #HeelsUpHarris ascends to the top of the Biden VP list: What could go wrong?

The trends on Twitter are in and Kamala Harris has risen to the top of Joe Biden's heap for vice presidential picks.

Some random responses, none good:

She's black, and she's female, which is Biden's criterion for picking a vice president.  And unless he wants to go Norbit with Stacey Abrams, Harris might just be all he's got, given how he's boxed himself in.

Given how Biden is showing greater signs of senility than ever, they might as well even declare her the real president if, heaven forbid, Biden should win.

Harris sees that, which is why she's jumping at the chance.  Ever since her days as Willie Brown's mistress, sleeping her way to the top in politics, she's known a good opportunity when she's seen one. 

She's not #HeelsUpHarris, as Twitter's great kahuna, James Woods, nicknamed her, for nothing.

Problem one, for Joe, at least: She's phony, and it's not just her phony Twitter followers.

Harris, recall, is the one who tried to pander to black voters and guilt-minded whites to the effect that she, in all her Berkeley, California and Canadian upbringing, had suffered through her upbringing in the midst of some kind of Klan country.  Her yearbook photos from her high school showed otherwise.

Being half east Indian, she's not typically black, though she'd have you think she was.  Here's how she acquired that "credential":

Kamala Harris wanted to go to a black school. That’s what black folks called Howard University in the early 1980s when Harris was a teenager considering her future.

Harris, she would say later, was seeking an experience wholly different from what she had long known. She’d attended majority-white schools her entire life — from elementary school in Berkeley, Calif., to high school in Montreal. Her parents’ professional lives and their personal story were bound up in majority-white institutions. Her father, an economist from Jamaica, was teaching at Stanford University. Her mother, a cancer researcher from India, had done her graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley, where the couple had met and fallen in love. And Harris’s younger sister would eventually enroll at Stanford.

And here's what she did thereafter, according to Politico's Michael Kruse:

Her rise, however, was propelled in and by a very different milieu. In this less explored piece of her past, Harris used as a launching pad the tightly knit world of San Francisco high society, navigating early on this rarefied world of influence and opulence, charming and partying with movers and shakers — ably cultivating relationships with VIPs who would become friends and also backers and donors of every one of her political campaigns, tapping into deep pockets and becoming a popular figure in a small world dominated by a handful of powerful families. This stratum of San Francisco remains a profoundly important part of her network — including not just powerful Democratic donors but an ambassador appointed by President Donald Trump who ran in the same circles.

Harris, now 54, often has talked about the importance of having "a seat at the table," of being an insider instead of an outsider. And she learned that skill in this crowded, incestuous, famously challenging political proving ground, where she worked to score spots at the some of the city's most sought-after tables. In the mid- to late '90s and into the aughts, the correspondents who kept tabs on the comings and goings of the area's A-listers noted where Harris was and what she was doing and who she was with. As she advanced professionally, jumping from Alameda County to posts in the offices of the district and city attorneys across the Bay, she was a trustee, too, of the museum of modern art and active in causes concerning AIDS and the prevention of domestic abuse, and out and about at fashion shows and cocktail parties and galas and get-togethers at the most modish boutiques. She was, in the breezy, buzzy parlance of these kinds of columns, one of the "Pretty Thangs." She was a "rising star." She was "rather perfect." And she mingled with "spiffy and powerful friends" who were her contemporaries as well as their even more influential mothers and fathers. All this was fun, but it wasn't unserious. It was seeing and being seen with a purpose, society activity with political utility.

After that, she became "cop Kamala" as the lefties say, or a pretty dirty prosecutor, both in San Francisco and as California's attorney general.  She always put the needs of the Democratic establishment above the people she said she was "helping."  Here's something from an item I wrote about earlier:

So here's a new one, from California watcher Susan Crabtree at RealClearPolitics, reporting Harris's soapboxing at the second presidential debate:

"So in my background as attorney general of California, I took on the big banks who preyed on the homeowners, many of whom lost their homes and will never be able to buy another," Harris said in late July during the second round of Democratic debates in Detroit.

Here's what really happened:

In fact, she and several other state attorneys general were instrumental in negotiating a $25 billion national settlement with five of the top U.S. mortgage lenders to provide debt relief and other financial services to struggling homeowners. But in 2012, just months after Harris secured those funds along with the other state AGs, then-California Gov. Jerry Brown diverted $331 million from California's portion of the settlement to pay off state budget shortfalls incurred before the housing crisis.

Although Harris initially spoke out against Brown's diversion of the funds, she remained silent on a subsequent court battle that began in 2014 — even after she left the attorney general's office and for the last year and a half while serving as senator and during her presidential bid this year.

She shook down some banks in the name of 'the people' and then went and used the money for something else. No wonder she's always been popular with the Democratic one-party blue-state establishment. I have a full blog on that here.

And being part of that establishment, she protected that establishment - such as a sex harrasser, Larry Wallace, who happened to be a top aide during her stint as California attorney general, and whose transgressions forced the state to shell out more than a million dollars in compensation to his victims while he was on the job.

Harris claimed she didn't know a thing about it. Establishment, see, protects its own. So much for #MeToo.

Here's another corrupt little manuever - she managed to obtain a Los Angeles Police Department Praetorian guard that followed her wherever she went across the state. Police for me, but not for thee. Not her first corruption rodeo.

How exactly is that kind of establishment record - sucking up to the rich, protecting Democratic operatives, using all matter of executive privilege, etc., going to win over Bernie Sanders supporters? If Joe Biden picks Harris, he can write them off, these are their hot-button issues.

Worse still is her record as a criminal prosecutor, the Tulsi Gabbard takedowns described - the very takedowns that sank Harris's presidential bid before she even got to the primaries. In Tulsi's words:

There are too many examples to cite but she put over 1,500 people in jail for marijuana violations and then laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana.

She blocked evidence that would have freed an innocent man from death row until the courts forced her to do so. She kept people in prison beyond their sentences to use them as cheap labor for the state of California, and she fought to keep a cash bail system in place that impacts poor people in the worst kind of way.

In an era of protests against police brutality in one-party blue cities, particularly from Black Lives Matter supporters, putting Harris on the ticket with Biden makes about as much sense as Republicans putting Mitt Romney at the top of the 2012 ticket in an age when Americans wanted to get rid of Obamacare. Romney, recall, launched his own version of the government takeover prior to President Obama's legacy program.

As a Republican, perhaps this is all good opposition research fodder for President Trump or Vice President Pence to hurl thunderbolts at in the upcoming presidential election. Maybe we should snicker. 

But it just goes to show how hard up the Democrats are for untainted candidates who can manage some kind of connection to normal people. If Kamala Harris is the best Joe Biden has got, it's not happening.

Image credit: CNN via YouTube screen shot.

The trends on Twitter are in and Kamala Harris has risen to the top of Joe Biden's heap for vice presidential picks.

Some random responses, none good:

She's black, and she's female, which is Biden's criterion for picking a vice president.  And unless he wants to go Norbit with Stacey Abrams, Harris might just be all he's got, given how he's boxed himself in.

Given how Biden is showing greater signs of senility than ever, they might as well even declare her the real president if, heaven forbid, Biden should win.

Harris sees that, which is why she's jumping at the chance.  Ever since her days as Willie Brown's mistress, sleeping her way to the top in politics, she's known a good opportunity when she's seen one. 

She's not #HeelsUpHarris, as Twitter's great kahuna, James Woods, nicknamed her, for nothing.

Problem one, for Joe, at least: She's phony, and it's not just her phony Twitter followers.

Harris, recall, is the one who tried to pander to black voters and guilt-minded whites to the effect that she, in all her Berkeley, California and Canadian upbringing, had suffered through her upbringing in the midst of some kind of Klan country.  Her yearbook photos from her high school showed otherwise.

Being half east Indian, she's not typically black, though she'd have you think she was.  Here's how she acquired that "credential":

Kamala Harris wanted to go to a black school. That’s what black folks called Howard University in the early 1980s when Harris was a teenager considering her future.

Harris, she would say later, was seeking an experience wholly different from what she had long known. She’d attended majority-white schools her entire life — from elementary school in Berkeley, Calif., to high school in Montreal. Her parents’ professional lives and their personal story were bound up in majority-white institutions. Her father, an economist from Jamaica, was teaching at Stanford University. Her mother, a cancer researcher from India, had done her graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley, where the couple had met and fallen in love. And Harris’s younger sister would eventually enroll at Stanford.

And here's what she did thereafter, according to Politico's Michael Kruse:

Her rise, however, was propelled in and by a very different milieu. In this less explored piece of her past, Harris used as a launching pad the tightly knit world of San Francisco high society, navigating early on this rarefied world of influence and opulence, charming and partying with movers and shakers — ably cultivating relationships with VIPs who would become friends and also backers and donors of every one of her political campaigns, tapping into deep pockets and becoming a popular figure in a small world dominated by a handful of powerful families. This stratum of San Francisco remains a profoundly important part of her network — including not just powerful Democratic donors but an ambassador appointed by President Donald Trump who ran in the same circles.

Harris, now 54, often has talked about the importance of having "a seat at the table," of being an insider instead of an outsider. And she learned that skill in this crowded, incestuous, famously challenging political proving ground, where she worked to score spots at the some of the city's most sought-after tables. In the mid- to late '90s and into the aughts, the correspondents who kept tabs on the comings and goings of the area's A-listers noted where Harris was and what she was doing and who she was with. As she advanced professionally, jumping from Alameda County to posts in the offices of the district and city attorneys across the Bay, she was a trustee, too, of the museum of modern art and active in causes concerning AIDS and the prevention of domestic abuse, and out and about at fashion shows and cocktail parties and galas and get-togethers at the most modish boutiques. She was, in the breezy, buzzy parlance of these kinds of columns, one of the "Pretty Thangs." She was a "rising star." She was "rather perfect." And she mingled with "spiffy and powerful friends" who were her contemporaries as well as their even more influential mothers and fathers. All this was fun, but it wasn't unserious. It was seeing and being seen with a purpose, society activity with political utility.

After that, she became "cop Kamala" as the lefties say, or a pretty dirty prosecutor, both in San Francisco and as California's attorney general.  She always put the needs of the Democratic establishment above the people she said she was "helping."  Here's something from an item I wrote about earlier:

So here's a new one, from California watcher Susan Crabtree at RealClearPolitics, reporting Harris's soapboxing at the second presidential debate:

"So in my background as attorney general of California, I took on the big banks who preyed on the homeowners, many of whom lost their homes and will never be able to buy another," Harris said in late July during the second round of Democratic debates in Detroit.

Here's what really happened:

In fact, she and several other state attorneys general were instrumental in negotiating a $25 billion national settlement with five of the top U.S. mortgage lenders to provide debt relief and other financial services to struggling homeowners. But in 2012, just months after Harris secured those funds along with the other state AGs, then-California Gov. Jerry Brown diverted $331 million from California's portion of the settlement to pay off state budget shortfalls incurred before the housing crisis.

Although Harris initially spoke out against Brown's diversion of the funds, she remained silent on a subsequent court battle that began in 2014 — even after she left the attorney general's office and for the last year and a half while serving as senator and during her presidential bid this year.

She shook down some banks in the name of 'the people' and then went and used the money for something else. No wonder she's always been popular with the Democratic one-party blue-state establishment. I have a full blog on that here.

And being part of that establishment, she protected that establishment - such as a sex harrasser, Larry Wallace, who happened to be a top aide during her stint as California attorney general, and whose transgressions forced the state to shell out more than a million dollars in compensation to his victims while he was on the job.

Harris claimed she didn't know a thing about it. Establishment, see, protects its own. So much for #MeToo.

Here's another corrupt little manuever - she managed to obtain a Los Angeles Police Department Praetorian guard that followed her wherever she went across the state. Police for me, but not for thee. Not her first corruption rodeo.

How exactly is that kind of establishment record - sucking up to the rich, protecting Democratic operatives, using all matter of executive privilege, etc., going to win over Bernie Sanders supporters? If Joe Biden picks Harris, he can write them off, these are their hot-button issues.

Worse still is her record as a criminal prosecutor, the Tulsi Gabbard takedowns described - the very takedowns that sank Harris's presidential bid before she even got to the primaries. In Tulsi's words:

There are too many examples to cite but she put over 1,500 people in jail for marijuana violations and then laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana.

She blocked evidence that would have freed an innocent man from death row until the courts forced her to do so. She kept people in prison beyond their sentences to use them as cheap labor for the state of California, and she fought to keep a cash bail system in place that impacts poor people in the worst kind of way.

In an era of protests against police brutality in one-party blue cities, particularly from Black Lives Matter supporters, putting Harris on the ticket with Biden makes about as much sense as Republicans putting Mitt Romney at the top of the 2012 ticket in an age when Americans wanted to get rid of Obamacare. Romney, recall, launched his own version of the government takeover prior to President Obama's legacy program.

As a Republican, perhaps this is all good opposition research fodder for President Trump or Vice President Pence to hurl thunderbolts at in the upcoming presidential election. Maybe we should snicker. 

But it just goes to show how hard up the Democrats are for untainted candidates who can manage some kind of connection to normal people. If Kamala Harris is the best Joe Biden has got, it's not happening.

Image credit: CNN via YouTube screen shot.