As mob power grows, speak now or forever (be forced to) hold your peace

The anarcho-socialist revolutionary dictatorship is on the move.  It's currently purging people who have failed to show sufficient allegiance to the cause.  When that purge ends, the survivors will turn their attention to the rest of us.  In America, we've reached the stage of "speak now or forever (be forced to) hold your peace."

I'm currently enjoying watching those people who, just last week, were ostentatiously woke suddenly discovering that they're not woke enough.  These are the same people who scolded conservatives who worried that "safe spaces" and "trigger warnings" on college campuses would churn out twisted, paranoid minds.  We were called reactionaries, fascists, racists, and worse.  We were also correct.

This week, the New York Times forced out editorial page editor James Bennet and demoted deputy opinion editor Jim Dao back to the newsroom.  Both had triggered Ben Rhodes's know-nothing twenty-somethings by allowing a U.S. senator to write an opinion piece stating what the majority of the country believes: that President Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act if civil disorder gets too out of control.

At the Philadelphia Inquirer, the same college-grad mob forced out a groveling Stan Wischnowski, the editor who authorized an article saying buildings matter.  And at Variety, editor in chief Claudia Eller, who trumpeted LGBT correctness, failed the current wokeness test when she hurt a reporter's feelings by saying the reporter sounded "bitter."  One strike, and you're out.

These purges happened at "thought leader" publications that purvey the propaganda that passes for news (the Times and the Inquirer) or shape the popular culture (Variety).  The latest high-profile firing, though, is moving from thought leaders to any leaders.  Adam Rapoport, who has spent almost ten years as Bon Appétit's editor in chief, felt the wrath of the mob.  We've moved from news to food.

These are Rapoport's alleged sins against race:

• Rapoport paid white people for video appearances but did not pay minorities (something Condé Nast, the parent company, denies).

• Rapoport wasn't sufficiently enthusiastic about Puerto Rican food.

• Either 7 or 16 years ago (it's unclear), Rapoport dressed in "brownface."

 

 

• Rapoport didn't believe that the magazine's readers (i.e., paying customers who fund paychecks and operating expenses) would be interested in complicated African cuisine.

When approached about his sins, Rapoport didn't fight back.  Instead, in true-believer fashion, he crawled away with his tail between his legs, mewling out  his confession as he went (emphasis mine):

I am stepping down as editor in chief of Bon Appétit to reflect on the work that I need to do as a human being and to allow Bon Appétit to get to a better place. From an extremely ill-conceived Halloween costume 16 years ago to my blind spots as an editor, I've not championed an inclusive vision. And ultimately, it's been at the expense of Bon Appétit and its staff, as well as our readers. They all deserve better. The staff has been working hard to evolve the brand in a positive, more diverse direction. I will do all I can to support that work, but I am not the one to lead that work. I am deeply sorry for my failings and to the position in which I put the editors of BA. Thank you.

I wanted to write that "it would take a heart of stone not to laugh at that confession," but the contrary is true.  While Rapoport is still low-hanging fruit, in that he's visible and woke (but not woke enough), he's not as low-hanging as the people in the first round of purges.  The revolutionaries are climbing higher up the civilizational tree, destroying as they go.

Pastor Martin Niemöller, who once supported Adolf Hitler, came to regret that decision and found himself almost dying in Sachsenhausen and Dachau.  After the war, he unforgivably supported the communists, having somehow missed that fascists and communists are different branches of the same totalitarian socialist family tree.  Still, he managed to utter some of the wisest words of the 20th century:

They came first for the Communists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time no one was left to speak up.

It's enjoyable watching revolutionaries take out their weaker members, but don't forget that they'll be coming for you soon, too.  Speak now, or they'll make sure you forever hold your peace.

 

 

The anarcho-socialist revolutionary dictatorship is on the move.  It's currently purging people who have failed to show sufficient allegiance to the cause.  When that purge ends, the survivors will turn their attention to the rest of us.  In America, we've reached the stage of "speak now or forever (be forced to) hold your peace."

I'm currently enjoying watching those people who, just last week, were ostentatiously woke suddenly discovering that they're not woke enough.  These are the same people who scolded conservatives who worried that "safe spaces" and "trigger warnings" on college campuses would churn out twisted, paranoid minds.  We were called reactionaries, fascists, racists, and worse.  We were also correct.

This week, the New York Times forced out editorial page editor James Bennet and demoted deputy opinion editor Jim Dao back to the newsroom.  Both had triggered Ben Rhodes's know-nothing twenty-somethings by allowing a U.S. senator to write an opinion piece stating what the majority of the country believes: that President Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act if civil disorder gets too out of control.

At the Philadelphia Inquirer, the same college-grad mob forced out a groveling Stan Wischnowski, the editor who authorized an article saying buildings matter.  And at Variety, editor in chief Claudia Eller, who trumpeted LGBT correctness, failed the current wokeness test when she hurt a reporter's feelings by saying the reporter sounded "bitter."  One strike, and you're out.

These purges happened at "thought leader" publications that purvey the propaganda that passes for news (the Times and the Inquirer) or shape the popular culture (Variety).  The latest high-profile firing, though, is moving from thought leaders to any leaders.  Adam Rapoport, who has spent almost ten years as Bon Appétit's editor in chief, felt the wrath of the mob.  We've moved from news to food.

These are Rapoport's alleged sins against race:

• Rapoport paid white people for video appearances but did not pay minorities (something Condé Nast, the parent company, denies).

• Rapoport wasn't sufficiently enthusiastic about Puerto Rican food.

• Either 7 or 16 years ago (it's unclear), Rapoport dressed in "brownface."

 

 

• Rapoport didn't believe that the magazine's readers (i.e., paying customers who fund paychecks and operating expenses) would be interested in complicated African cuisine.

When approached about his sins, Rapoport didn't fight back.  Instead, in true-believer fashion, he crawled away with his tail between his legs, mewling out  his confession as he went (emphasis mine):

I am stepping down as editor in chief of Bon Appétit to reflect on the work that I need to do as a human being and to allow Bon Appétit to get to a better place. From an extremely ill-conceived Halloween costume 16 years ago to my blind spots as an editor, I've not championed an inclusive vision. And ultimately, it's been at the expense of Bon Appétit and its staff, as well as our readers. They all deserve better. The staff has been working hard to evolve the brand in a positive, more diverse direction. I will do all I can to support that work, but I am not the one to lead that work. I am deeply sorry for my failings and to the position in which I put the editors of BA. Thank you.

I wanted to write that "it would take a heart of stone not to laugh at that confession," but the contrary is true.  While Rapoport is still low-hanging fruit, in that he's visible and woke (but not woke enough), he's not as low-hanging as the people in the first round of purges.  The revolutionaries are climbing higher up the civilizational tree, destroying as they go.

Pastor Martin Niemöller, who once supported Adolf Hitler, came to regret that decision and found himself almost dying in Sachsenhausen and Dachau.  After the war, he unforgivably supported the communists, having somehow missed that fascists and communists are different branches of the same totalitarian socialist family tree.  Still, he managed to utter some of the wisest words of the 20th century:

They came first for the Communists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time no one was left to speak up.

It's enjoyable watching revolutionaries take out their weaker members, but don't forget that they'll be coming for you soon, too.  Speak now, or they'll make sure you forever hold your peace.