Why Dem governors prolong their states' lockdown: Follow the money

As each day passes, there is more good news about the Wuhan Virus pandemic in the United States.   The general consensus is that the nation has passed the peak and is well on the downhill side of the infamous curve that the media declared "experts" claimed necessitated a national lockdown and 30+ million unemployed.

Recent results of a number of antibody tests in California, New York, Florida, and Massachusetts  indicate that the actual death rate is around the same as the seasonal flu, or 0.1–0.5%   The World Health Organization is now touting Sweden as the model in handling the virus outbreak without resorting to a national lockdown, raising the question: was the lockdown even necessary?

While a number of states are reopening their economies, many are not.  These governors are claiming that the threat in their state is still overwhelming and have extended the lockdowns for another month or more. 

Is there, in reality, another reason for prolonging the misery in these states?  There is an age-old adage that is always relevant whenever one is dealing with politicians: follow the money.

The state of Maine has a population of 1.3 million and has experienced 52 deaths (from the coronavirus, or 0.004%).  Yet Governor Janet Mills (D) has extended the lockdown until June 1.  As of the end of January 2020, the state was facing a $525-million shortfall with no solution in sight — until the coronavirus pandemic and a potential bailout from the federal government.  The longer the state is locked down, the greater the revenue losses and the more money Mrs. Mills can demand from Washington.

California, with a population of 38 million, has recorded 1,944 deaths, or 0.005%.  Its pension and general obligations are overwhelming and were so long before the coronavirus.  The same is true for Illinois, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut among other states — all of whom are extending their lockdowns through the end of May.

The Wuhan Virus pandemic and the nation's reaction to it have given many states a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to siphon money from a federal government that has cast all caution to the wind and is printing money as fast as the presses can operate.

Now that the original objective of "flattening the curve" has been achieved, there is more to these lockdowns than preventing the spread of the coronavirus.  Over the next three to four weeks, as Congress and President Trump are confronted with yet another massive spending bill in order to bail out the states, the demands made by the individual states and their governors will confirm their true motives.

Last night, Tucker Carlson did a segment on Maine's extended lockdown and a restaurant-owner who is defying it:

Photo credit: Grabien screen grab (cropped).  

As each day passes, there is more good news about the Wuhan Virus pandemic in the United States.   The general consensus is that the nation has passed the peak and is well on the downhill side of the infamous curve that the media declared "experts" claimed necessitated a national lockdown and 30+ million unemployed.

Recent results of a number of antibody tests in California, New York, Florida, and Massachusetts  indicate that the actual death rate is around the same as the seasonal flu, or 0.1–0.5%   The World Health Organization is now touting Sweden as the model in handling the virus outbreak without resorting to a national lockdown, raising the question: was the lockdown even necessary?

While a number of states are reopening their economies, many are not.  These governors are claiming that the threat in their state is still overwhelming and have extended the lockdowns for another month or more. 

Is there, in reality, another reason for prolonging the misery in these states?  There is an age-old adage that is always relevant whenever one is dealing with politicians: follow the money.

The state of Maine has a population of 1.3 million and has experienced 52 deaths (from the coronavirus, or 0.004%).  Yet Governor Janet Mills (D) has extended the lockdown until June 1.  As of the end of January 2020, the state was facing a $525-million shortfall with no solution in sight — until the coronavirus pandemic and a potential bailout from the federal government.  The longer the state is locked down, the greater the revenue losses and the more money Mrs. Mills can demand from Washington.

California, with a population of 38 million, has recorded 1,944 deaths, or 0.005%.  Its pension and general obligations are overwhelming and were so long before the coronavirus.  The same is true for Illinois, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut among other states — all of whom are extending their lockdowns through the end of May.

The Wuhan Virus pandemic and the nation's reaction to it have given many states a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to siphon money from a federal government that has cast all caution to the wind and is printing money as fast as the presses can operate.

Now that the original objective of "flattening the curve" has been achieved, there is more to these lockdowns than preventing the spread of the coronavirus.  Over the next three to four weeks, as Congress and President Trump are confronted with yet another massive spending bill in order to bail out the states, the demands made by the individual states and their governors will confirm their true motives.

Last night, Tucker Carlson did a segment on Maine's extended lockdown and a restaurant-owner who is defying it:

Photo credit: Grabien screen grab (cropped).