We remember the great Sam Johnson, 1930-2020

Back in 1994, I had the chance to catch a speech by then Representative Sam Johnson.  He was fascinating, specially when he related his amazing military story.

Former US Representative Sam Johnson died in Texas on May 27.  He had a wonderful life, as you can see in this obituary:  

Former U.S. Rep. Sam Johnson, a Texas congressman for more than 25 years and Vietnam War hero, died Wednesday in Plano, a family spokesperson said. He was 89.

First elected to Congress in 1991, Johnson gained a reputation as a strong conservative voice in the Texas delegation. In 2010, he was tied for the most conservative member of Congress, according to the National Journal’s rankings.

Johnson flew combat missions during the Korean and Vietnam wars as a fighter pilot. While flying over North Vietnam in 1966, his plane was struck down. He was held as a prisoner of war for nearly seven years, including a stint at the Hoa Lo Prison known as the Hanoi Hilton.

Along the way, he flew fighter jets in Korea, Vietnam, shared a cell with the late Senator John McCain and became a prominent member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Best of all, he was always happy to talk to a constituent even when they disagreed.  He was a first-class gentleman and true patriot.

Rest in Peace, Congressman Johnson.

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Back in 1994, I had the chance to catch a speech by then Representative Sam Johnson.  He was fascinating, specially when he related his amazing military story.

Former US Representative Sam Johnson died in Texas on May 27.  He had a wonderful life, as you can see in this obituary:  

Former U.S. Rep. Sam Johnson, a Texas congressman for more than 25 years and Vietnam War hero, died Wednesday in Plano, a family spokesperson said. He was 89.

First elected to Congress in 1991, Johnson gained a reputation as a strong conservative voice in the Texas delegation. In 2010, he was tied for the most conservative member of Congress, according to the National Journal’s rankings.

Johnson flew combat missions during the Korean and Vietnam wars as a fighter pilot. While flying over North Vietnam in 1966, his plane was struck down. He was held as a prisoner of war for nearly seven years, including a stint at the Hoa Lo Prison known as the Hanoi Hilton.

Along the way, he flew fighter jets in Korea, Vietnam, shared a cell with the late Senator John McCain and became a prominent member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Best of all, he was always happy to talk to a constituent even when they disagreed.  He was a first-class gentleman and true patriot.

Rest in Peace, Congressman Johnson.

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.