No, we are not 'at war' with an 'invisible enemy'

With respect to the coronavirus, President Trump often says "we're at war with an invisible enemy."  The message is wrong, inaccurate, histrionic, and disrespectful to our veterans, and it validates the lefts narrative.

First and foremost, you go to war to protect and defend your nation.  But the severe mitigation measures put in place are destroying our nation.

And when our military do go to war, they put their lives on the line to defend America, American values, freedom, and civilization itself.  While people are dying from the coronavirus, they have not put their lives on the line to defend America.  They died because they succumbed to a novel virus, just as people die every day from all manner of infection, disease, or injury.  To call this a war is an insult to our military, who are willing to make the ultimate sacrifice to keep us safe.

In addition, using the word "war" when speaking about our efforts to contain the virus creates a level of hysteria that isn't helpful or necessary.  The left has been manufacturing and fueling hysteria quite well.  I don't think we need to add to it.

And if we are at war with a virus, then ultimately, we're at war with each other, because humans are the vectors for the virus.  And so we have become wary, frightened, and suspicious of one another.  We keep our distance and give people the evil eye if they dare cough, sneeze, or not wear a mask.  And while Trump may have intended the expression to inspire us to feel we are united in fighting the virus, at this point in the madness we have created, the language fuels the wrong impression of our fellow citizens.  We have all become the enemy of the other.  A threat.  Only time will tell how long it will take to unravel such a dreadful state of being.

Lastly, the idea that we're "at war" fuels and validates the left's power-grab.  If we're truly at war, then all is justifiable.

So, no, we are not at war with an invisible enemy.  Our language when speaking about this matters.

What landed on our shores was a novel coronavirus that we have no immunity to.  It appears to be particularly infectious.  Its mortality rate remains unknown thanks to botched models at the outset, and now, an inflated mortality rate and sluggish antibody testing.

There is no war.

There is no invisible enemy.

There is a viral infection circulating.  The sooner we can build herd immunity, the better — far better than sitting around waiting for the "experts" to develop a vaccine that may never come, or that may be brought to market too soon, that may not be effective and, most seriously, that may be mandated by the state.

Graphic credit: Needpix.

With respect to the coronavirus, President Trump often says "we're at war with an invisible enemy."  The message is wrong, inaccurate, histrionic, and disrespectful to our veterans, and it validates the lefts narrative.

First and foremost, you go to war to protect and defend your nation.  But the severe mitigation measures put in place are destroying our nation.

And when our military do go to war, they put their lives on the line to defend America, American values, freedom, and civilization itself.  While people are dying from the coronavirus, they have not put their lives on the line to defend America.  They died because they succumbed to a novel virus, just as people die every day from all manner of infection, disease, or injury.  To call this a war is an insult to our military, who are willing to make the ultimate sacrifice to keep us safe.

In addition, using the word "war" when speaking about our efforts to contain the virus creates a level of hysteria that isn't helpful or necessary.  The left has been manufacturing and fueling hysteria quite well.  I don't think we need to add to it.

And if we are at war with a virus, then ultimately, we're at war with each other, because humans are the vectors for the virus.  And so we have become wary, frightened, and suspicious of one another.  We keep our distance and give people the evil eye if they dare cough, sneeze, or not wear a mask.  And while Trump may have intended the expression to inspire us to feel we are united in fighting the virus, at this point in the madness we have created, the language fuels the wrong impression of our fellow citizens.  We have all become the enemy of the other.  A threat.  Only time will tell how long it will take to unravel such a dreadful state of being.

Lastly, the idea that we're "at war" fuels and validates the left's power-grab.  If we're truly at war, then all is justifiable.

So, no, we are not at war with an invisible enemy.  Our language when speaking about this matters.

What landed on our shores was a novel coronavirus that we have no immunity to.  It appears to be particularly infectious.  Its mortality rate remains unknown thanks to botched models at the outset, and now, an inflated mortality rate and sluggish antibody testing.

There is no war.

There is no invisible enemy.

There is a viral infection circulating.  The sooner we can build herd immunity, the better — far better than sitting around waiting for the "experts" to develop a vaccine that may never come, or that may be brought to market too soon, that may not be effective and, most seriously, that may be mandated by the state.

Graphic credit: Needpix.