There’s more evidence that the ‘Trump made us eat fish tank cleaner’ story is fake

In March, a story broke that a Phoenix man had died and his wife had almost died because they drank fish tank cleaner. Wanda Lenius, the wife, claimed that she and her husband, having heard President Trump recommend chloroquine and knowing that their fish tank cleaner had chloroquine phosphate, drank the cleaner in a panicked bid to protect themselves from the virus. She got sick; he died. The story would ordinarily have been just an oddity, except for the fact that the media excitedly accused Trump of killing people.

Within a few days, it emerged that Wanda was unlikely to have relied on Trump’s advice because she was a fanatic Trump hater. I theorized that the story sounded like the plot for an Agatha Christie or Dorothy Sayers murder mystery. Both authors wrote stories in which the murderer ingested a small amount of the poison to avoid suspicion.

Consistent with a murder mystery theme, “Techno Fog” did some sleuthing and discovered that Wanda had a very checkered emotional history. Court records revealed she had a history of paranoia, depression, alcohol abuse, mental breakdowns, and anger, and that she was unhappy in her marriage.

More information has now emerged that makes it even less likely that Wanda and her departed husband, Gary, just happened to drink chloroquine phosphate on Trump’s recommendation because they were scared about the Wuhan virus. Doing the legwork that the mainstream media refuses to do, The Washington Free Beacon’s Alana Goodman tracked down people who knew Gary Lenius. They paint a picture of a calm, rational engineer who would have understood the difference between medicinal chloroquine and fish tank cleaner, and who never would have acted as impulsively as Wanda described:

[F]riends of 68-year-old Gary Lenius, the Arizona man who passed away last month from drinking a fish tank cleaner that contained an ingredient, chloroquine phosphate, that Trump had touted as a potential coronavirus cure, say they are still struggling to understand what drove an engineer with an extensive science background to do something so wildly out of character.

These people describe Lenius as intelligent and levelheaded, not prone to the sort of reckless and impulsive behavior he reportedly engaged in on the day he died. This account is based on interviews with three people who knew Lenius well and paints a picture of a troubled marriage characterized by Wanda Lenius’s explosive anger.

“What bothers me about this is that Gary was a very intelligent man, a retired [mechanical] engineer who designed systems for John Deere in Waterloo, Iowa, and I really can’t see the scenario where Gary would say, ‘Yes, please, I would love to drink some of that Koi fish tank cleaner,’” one of his close friends told the Washington Free Beacon. “It just doesn’t make any sense.”

Gary’s friends describe an interesting man whom people liked. They were less enthusiastic about Wanda, a woman who verbally abused Gary, routinely humiliating him in public:

“Wanda would constantly berate Gary in public,” said a source who asked that all identifying information be withheld. “Everyone was embarrassed for him, but he outwardly did not seem to care much.”

“In our opinion, their marriage was seen outwardly to be as one-sided as a marriage possibly could be: Gary worshiped Wanda,” this person said, adding that his wife “would routinely call him a ‘doofus’” and humiliate him in public.

Lenius’s friend recalled Wanda Lenius destroying her husband’s aircraft model collection after he returned home late for a meal.

Shortly after their marriage, Wanda ended up charged with domestic abuse for hitting Gary and trying to bean him with a birdhouse. Wanda was also litigious, for she sued two former employees for various combinations of sexual harassment, age discrimination, and gender discrimination. She claimed to have been traumatized by both experiences.

Presumably, the police are investigating what really happened on the fateful night Gary died. The only thing I’m still trying to figure out is how I could have missed the fact that this is the case of “A fish-tank-cleaner-eater called Wanda.” (You may all groan now.)

In March, a story broke that a Phoenix man had died and his wife had almost died because they drank fish tank cleaner. Wanda Lenius, the wife, claimed that she and her husband, having heard President Trump recommend chloroquine and knowing that their fish tank cleaner had chloroquine phosphate, drank the cleaner in a panicked bid to protect themselves from the virus. She got sick; he died. The story would ordinarily have been just an oddity, except for the fact that the media excitedly accused Trump of killing people.

Within a few days, it emerged that Wanda was unlikely to have relied on Trump’s advice because she was a fanatic Trump hater. I theorized that the story sounded like the plot for an Agatha Christie or Dorothy Sayers murder mystery. Both authors wrote stories in which the murderer ingested a small amount of the poison to avoid suspicion.

Consistent with a murder mystery theme, “Techno Fog” did some sleuthing and discovered that Wanda had a very checkered emotional history. Court records revealed she had a history of paranoia, depression, alcohol abuse, mental breakdowns, and anger, and that she was unhappy in her marriage.

More information has now emerged that makes it even less likely that Wanda and her departed husband, Gary, just happened to drink chloroquine phosphate on Trump’s recommendation because they were scared about the Wuhan virus. Doing the legwork that the mainstream media refuses to do, The Washington Free Beacon’s Alana Goodman tracked down people who knew Gary Lenius. They paint a picture of a calm, rational engineer who would have understood the difference between medicinal chloroquine and fish tank cleaner, and who never would have acted as impulsively as Wanda described:

[F]riends of 68-year-old Gary Lenius, the Arizona man who passed away last month from drinking a fish tank cleaner that contained an ingredient, chloroquine phosphate, that Trump had touted as a potential coronavirus cure, say they are still struggling to understand what drove an engineer with an extensive science background to do something so wildly out of character.

These people describe Lenius as intelligent and levelheaded, not prone to the sort of reckless and impulsive behavior he reportedly engaged in on the day he died. This account is based on interviews with three people who knew Lenius well and paints a picture of a troubled marriage characterized by Wanda Lenius’s explosive anger.

“What bothers me about this is that Gary was a very intelligent man, a retired [mechanical] engineer who designed systems for John Deere in Waterloo, Iowa, and I really can’t see the scenario where Gary would say, ‘Yes, please, I would love to drink some of that Koi fish tank cleaner,’” one of his close friends told the Washington Free Beacon. “It just doesn’t make any sense.”

Gary’s friends describe an interesting man whom people liked. They were less enthusiastic about Wanda, a woman who verbally abused Gary, routinely humiliating him in public:

“Wanda would constantly berate Gary in public,” said a source who asked that all identifying information be withheld. “Everyone was embarrassed for him, but he outwardly did not seem to care much.”

“In our opinion, their marriage was seen outwardly to be as one-sided as a marriage possibly could be: Gary worshiped Wanda,” this person said, adding that his wife “would routinely call him a ‘doofus’” and humiliate him in public.

Lenius’s friend recalled Wanda Lenius destroying her husband’s aircraft model collection after he returned home late for a meal.

Shortly after their marriage, Wanda ended up charged with domestic abuse for hitting Gary and trying to bean him with a birdhouse. Wanda was also litigious, for she sued two former employees for various combinations of sexual harassment, age discrimination, and gender discrimination. She claimed to have been traumatized by both experiences.

Presumably, the police are investigating what really happened on the fateful night Gary died. The only thing I’m still trying to figure out is how I could have missed the fact that this is the case of “A fish-tank-cleaner-eater called Wanda.” (You may all groan now.)