Michael Moore stumbles upon the truth about so-called 'green' energy

Michael Moore is worried about Earth, although he's not focused on fossil fuel and cow farts.  Instead, he's worried because he just discovered that green energy is a scam.  That's the point in his new documentary, Planet of the Humans, which was released Tuesday for free on YouTube.  In a long and poorly written introduction on the YouTube page, the people who made the video explain that the green revolution could have worked out if only the whole movement hadn't sold itself out to the rich and powerful, resulting in a sham and a scam.

Michael Moore presents Planet of the Humans, a documentary that dares to say what no one else will this Earth Day — that we are losing the battle to stop climate change on planet earth because we are following leaders who have taken us down the wrong road — selling out the green movement to wealthy interests and corporate America. This film is the wake-up call to the reality we are afraid to face: that in the midst of a human-caused extinction event, the environmental movement's answer is to push for techno-fixes and band-aids. It's too little, too late.

Removed from the debate is the only thing that MIGHT save us: getting a grip on our out-of-control human presence and consumption. Why is this not THE issue? Because that would be bad for profits, bad for business. Have we environmentalists fallen for illusions, "green" illusions, that are anything but green, because we're scared that this is the end — and we've pinned all our hopes on biomass, wind turbines, and electric cars?

No amount of batteries are going to save us, warns director Jeff Gibbs (lifelong environmentalist and co-producer of "Fahrenheit 9/11" and "Bowling for Columbine"). This urgent, must-see movie, a full-frontal assault on our sacred cows, is guaranteed to generate anger, debate, and, hopefully, a willingness to see our survival in a new way — before it's too late.

It turns out that Moore, despite hectoring Americans to get with the green program, had managed to be completely unaware of the practical problems with green energy:

Moore said that he, like many people, thought electric cars were a good idea, "but I didn't really think about where is the electricity coming from?"

"I assumed solar panels would last for ever. I didn't know what went into the making of them," Moore added, referring to raw materials, including quartz, and the fossil fuels needed to manufacture the panels.

Moore illustrates the bubble in which greenies float.  If he'd had intellectual curiosity, he would have known that electric cars get power from natural gas, oil, or coal (some of which is clean burning and some not), which means they merely displace vehicle emissions from the tailpipe to the power plant.  Electric car batteries, most of which come from China, are also big polluters, as are the Chinese-made solar panels that worry Moore.  Solar panels also shift the pollution, in their case from the power plant to China's manufacturers.

Moore also discovered that alternative energy sources cannot fill the gap if fossil fuels are banned:

Gibbs interviews a scientist who researched corporate renewables programs who said, "I haven't found a single entity anywhere in the world running on 100% solar and wind alone." The film shows a forest being cut down to build an Apple solar farm.

The documentary does a good job at proving that conservatives were right to say that green energy is a scam:

But the apocalyptic rhetoric detracts little from the heart of the documentary, which exposes the complicity of climate activists including Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Sierra Club's Executive Director, in promoting pollution-intensive biomass energies, as well as natural gas.

[snip]

After Earth Day Founder Denis Hayes claims at a 2015 Earth Day concert that the event was being powered by solar, Gibbs goes behind the stage to find out the truth. "The concert is run by a diesel generation system," the solar vendor said. "That right there could run a toaster," said another vendor.

The film also debunks the claim made by Elon Musk that his "Gigafactory" to make batteries is powered by renewables. In fact, it is hooked up to the electric grid. 

Conservatives have made this point forever, but Michael Moore, the "intellectual" progressive documentary filmmaker, just figured it out.  The man is a moron, not because he's stupid, but because he wears ideologically tinted intellectual blinders.

If you think Moore's ignorance is the worst thing about him, think again.  Moore still buys into the whole apocalyptic anthropogenic climate change shtick.  Even the dangerously wrong Wuhan virus models haven't taught him that climate change models might be wrong, too.  Climate change is a faith, and one doesn't question the dogma.

Rather than becoming a climate change apostate, Moore has come up with a new solution.  If we can't cut down on pollution, we just have to cut down on humans:

A better approach, Gibbs suggests, would be people having fewer children. "Infinite growth on a finite planet is suicide," he says.

Forced abortions, mandatory euthanasia, and Earth-friendly genocide (once called "human sacrifice to propitiate the gods") won't be far behind.  Someone should sit Moore and Gibbs down with books explaining that capitalism is the best way to clean the planet, that fossil fuel is not running out, and that Generation IV nuclear energy will be a clean, safe, infinite energy source.

Michael Moore is worried about Earth, although he's not focused on fossil fuel and cow farts.  Instead, he's worried because he just discovered that green energy is a scam.  That's the point in his new documentary, Planet of the Humans, which was released Tuesday for free on YouTube.  In a long and poorly written introduction on the YouTube page, the people who made the video explain that the green revolution could have worked out if only the whole movement hadn't sold itself out to the rich and powerful, resulting in a sham and a scam.

Michael Moore presents Planet of the Humans, a documentary that dares to say what no one else will this Earth Day — that we are losing the battle to stop climate change on planet earth because we are following leaders who have taken us down the wrong road — selling out the green movement to wealthy interests and corporate America. This film is the wake-up call to the reality we are afraid to face: that in the midst of a human-caused extinction event, the environmental movement's answer is to push for techno-fixes and band-aids. It's too little, too late.

Removed from the debate is the only thing that MIGHT save us: getting a grip on our out-of-control human presence and consumption. Why is this not THE issue? Because that would be bad for profits, bad for business. Have we environmentalists fallen for illusions, "green" illusions, that are anything but green, because we're scared that this is the end — and we've pinned all our hopes on biomass, wind turbines, and electric cars?

No amount of batteries are going to save us, warns director Jeff Gibbs (lifelong environmentalist and co-producer of "Fahrenheit 9/11" and "Bowling for Columbine"). This urgent, must-see movie, a full-frontal assault on our sacred cows, is guaranteed to generate anger, debate, and, hopefully, a willingness to see our survival in a new way — before it's too late.

It turns out that Moore, despite hectoring Americans to get with the green program, had managed to be completely unaware of the practical problems with green energy:

Moore said that he, like many people, thought electric cars were a good idea, "but I didn't really think about where is the electricity coming from?"

"I assumed solar panels would last for ever. I didn't know what went into the making of them," Moore added, referring to raw materials, including quartz, and the fossil fuels needed to manufacture the panels.

Moore illustrates the bubble in which greenies float.  If he'd had intellectual curiosity, he would have known that electric cars get power from natural gas, oil, or coal (some of which is clean burning and some not), which means they merely displace vehicle emissions from the tailpipe to the power plant.  Electric car batteries, most of which come from China, are also big polluters, as are the Chinese-made solar panels that worry Moore.  Solar panels also shift the pollution, in their case from the power plant to China's manufacturers.

Moore also discovered that alternative energy sources cannot fill the gap if fossil fuels are banned:

Gibbs interviews a scientist who researched corporate renewables programs who said, "I haven't found a single entity anywhere in the world running on 100% solar and wind alone." The film shows a forest being cut down to build an Apple solar farm.

The documentary does a good job at proving that conservatives were right to say that green energy is a scam:

But the apocalyptic rhetoric detracts little from the heart of the documentary, which exposes the complicity of climate activists including Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Sierra Club's Executive Director, in promoting pollution-intensive biomass energies, as well as natural gas.

[snip]

After Earth Day Founder Denis Hayes claims at a 2015 Earth Day concert that the event was being powered by solar, Gibbs goes behind the stage to find out the truth. "The concert is run by a diesel generation system," the solar vendor said. "That right there could run a toaster," said another vendor.

The film also debunks the claim made by Elon Musk that his "Gigafactory" to make batteries is powered by renewables. In fact, it is hooked up to the electric grid. 

Conservatives have made this point forever, but Michael Moore, the "intellectual" progressive documentary filmmaker, just figured it out.  The man is a moron, not because he's stupid, but because he wears ideologically tinted intellectual blinders.

If you think Moore's ignorance is the worst thing about him, think again.  Moore still buys into the whole apocalyptic anthropogenic climate change shtick.  Even the dangerously wrong Wuhan virus models haven't taught him that climate change models might be wrong, too.  Climate change is a faith, and one doesn't question the dogma.

Rather than becoming a climate change apostate, Moore has come up with a new solution.  If we can't cut down on pollution, we just have to cut down on humans:

A better approach, Gibbs suggests, would be people having fewer children. "Infinite growth on a finite planet is suicide," he says.

Forced abortions, mandatory euthanasia, and Earth-friendly genocide (once called "human sacrifice to propitiate the gods") won't be far behind.  Someone should sit Moore and Gibbs down with books explaining that capitalism is the best way to clean the planet, that fossil fuel is not running out, and that Generation IV nuclear energy will be a clean, safe, infinite energy source.