Democrats are worried about black voters in November

On Saturday, the AP published an article describing Democrat worries about the Trump campaign team’s black outreach efforts. Democrats see that Trump is a Republican like no other, including his challenge to the Democrats’ decades’ long hold on black voters.

Democrats like to hide the fact that it was once Republican party that had the lock on black voters. The Republicans had earned that relationship. The Republican party was formed in 1854 as an abolitionist party, and it was the Republican party, under Abraham Lincoln’s leadership, that spearheaded a vast civil war to end that immoral practice.

What finally pried blacks away from the Republican party was government money. The first round of government checks came under Franklin Roosevelt. The second round came through Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society. That second round not only cemented blacks’ allegiance to the Democrat party, it also destroyed much of the black community.

Before the welfare state, blacks had made significant economic strides, with poverty dropping by almost half between 1940 and 1960 and income more than doubling between 1936 and 1959. In 1960, 78% of black children came from two-parent families. In the next sixty years, that number was turned on its head: Now, more than 70% of black children live in a single-parent home.

Children raised in those homes are more likely to be impoverished, the boys are more likely to end up in prison, and the girls are more likely to get pregnant as teenagers and repeat the single-parent cycle. Contrary to the third-wave feminist rap, men are important in a child’s life – and the Democrat-promoted welfare state made too many black men economically unnecessary.

With these facts, it ought to have been a no-brainer for Republican candidates to speak directly to the black community, but none did. Before Trump, both state and federal Republican candidates believed neither time nor money would change black ties to the Democrat party.

Trump doesn’t believe that, which gets us to the AP article. The article opens with Alice Marie Johnson, the black great-grandmother who, in 2018, had already spent 21 years in prison on a life sentence for a drug offense when Trump commuted her sentence. Her rapturous release from prison ended up in this Super Bowl 2020 ad from the Trump campaign:

The AP understands that this ad was only the beginning:

As the next phase of the 2020 presidential campaign begins, Trump’s team is betting that his actions, more than his words, on issues such as criminal justice, education and abortion will allow him to chip away at the Democrats’ overwhelming advantage with African Americans, Latinos and women.

The high-stakes effort is backed by tens of millions of dollars, an expansive field program and a sophisticated digital operation aimed at peeling away even a narrow slice of the voters who make up the backbone of the Democratic Party’s political base.

The article blames Trump for COVID-19’s toll on blacks, calls him a racist, and repeats the Charlottesville Hoax. Even with that defamatory material, though, the AP concedes that blacks and other minorities are paying attention to Trump’s criminal justice reform, money for historically black colleges, and funding in minority business communities:

The most powerful super PAC in Democratic politics, Priorities USA, and one of the party’s most powerful union allies, the Service Employees International Union, are pouring millions of dollars into separate campaigns to win over black voters. They quietly acknowledge that Trump opens the general election phase of the campaign with a significant organizational and digital advantage.

They also report anecdotal evidence and internal polling suggesting that Trump’s standing with younger black men, in particular, is rising.

Gallup found that Trump’s approval rating stood at just 15% with black voters and 24% with Latinos immediately after he took office in 2017. Last month, the polling organization reported his approval with the same groups at 17% and 33% respectively.

Even a tiny improvement for Trump with such groups could prove devastating in their fight to defeat him this fall.

The article doesn’t mention another advantage Trump has, and that’s prominent, outspoken blacks who support him. A Kanye West profile in GQ magazine quotes the superstar saying that his freedom-fighting parents “didn’t fight for me to be told by white people which white person I can vote on.” He also inveighs against the Hollywood celebrity culture that tries to silence him about Trump and MAGA.

Likewise, no other president before Trump had a #Blexit movement at his back. People such as Candace Owens, Brandon Tatum, and Terrence Williams are fighting the Democrat straight-jacket with humor, facts, and raw courage. Black communities ravaged by Democrats politics, and now seeing Democrats turn all their energy to illegal aliens, are paying attention – and the AP shows that the Democrats are getting nervous.

On Saturday, the AP published an article describing Democrat worries about the Trump campaign team’s black outreach efforts. Democrats see that Trump is a Republican like no other, including his challenge to the Democrats’ decades’ long hold on black voters.

Democrats like to hide the fact that it was once Republican party that had the lock on black voters. The Republicans had earned that relationship. The Republican party was formed in 1854 as an abolitionist party, and it was the Republican party, under Abraham Lincoln’s leadership, that spearheaded a vast civil war to end that immoral practice.

What finally pried blacks away from the Republican party was government money. The first round of government checks came under Franklin Roosevelt. The second round came through Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society. That second round not only cemented blacks’ allegiance to the Democrat party, it also destroyed much of the black community.

Before the welfare state, blacks had made significant economic strides, with poverty dropping by almost half between 1940 and 1960 and income more than doubling between 1936 and 1959. In 1960, 78% of black children came from two-parent families. In the next sixty years, that number was turned on its head: Now, more than 70% of black children live in a single-parent home.

Children raised in those homes are more likely to be impoverished, the boys are more likely to end up in prison, and the girls are more likely to get pregnant as teenagers and repeat the single-parent cycle. Contrary to the third-wave feminist rap, men are important in a child’s life – and the Democrat-promoted welfare state made too many black men economically unnecessary.

With these facts, it ought to have been a no-brainer for Republican candidates to speak directly to the black community, but none did. Before Trump, both state and federal Republican candidates believed neither time nor money would change black ties to the Democrat party.

Trump doesn’t believe that, which gets us to the AP article. The article opens with Alice Marie Johnson, the black great-grandmother who, in 2018, had already spent 21 years in prison on a life sentence for a drug offense when Trump commuted her sentence. Her rapturous release from prison ended up in this Super Bowl 2020 ad from the Trump campaign:

The AP understands that this ad was only the beginning:

As the next phase of the 2020 presidential campaign begins, Trump’s team is betting that his actions, more than his words, on issues such as criminal justice, education and abortion will allow him to chip away at the Democrats’ overwhelming advantage with African Americans, Latinos and women.

The high-stakes effort is backed by tens of millions of dollars, an expansive field program and a sophisticated digital operation aimed at peeling away even a narrow slice of the voters who make up the backbone of the Democratic Party’s political base.

The article blames Trump for COVID-19’s toll on blacks, calls him a racist, and repeats the Charlottesville Hoax. Even with that defamatory material, though, the AP concedes that blacks and other minorities are paying attention to Trump’s criminal justice reform, money for historically black colleges, and funding in minority business communities:

The most powerful super PAC in Democratic politics, Priorities USA, and one of the party’s most powerful union allies, the Service Employees International Union, are pouring millions of dollars into separate campaigns to win over black voters. They quietly acknowledge that Trump opens the general election phase of the campaign with a significant organizational and digital advantage.

They also report anecdotal evidence and internal polling suggesting that Trump’s standing with younger black men, in particular, is rising.

Gallup found that Trump’s approval rating stood at just 15% with black voters and 24% with Latinos immediately after he took office in 2017. Last month, the polling organization reported his approval with the same groups at 17% and 33% respectively.

Even a tiny improvement for Trump with such groups could prove devastating in their fight to defeat him this fall.

The article doesn’t mention another advantage Trump has, and that’s prominent, outspoken blacks who support him. A Kanye West profile in GQ magazine quotes the superstar saying that his freedom-fighting parents “didn’t fight for me to be told by white people which white person I can vote on.” He also inveighs against the Hollywood celebrity culture that tries to silence him about Trump and MAGA.

Likewise, no other president before Trump had a #Blexit movement at his back. People such as Candace Owens, Brandon Tatum, and Terrence Williams are fighting the Democrat straight-jacket with humor, facts, and raw courage. Black communities ravaged by Democrats politics, and now seeing Democrats turn all their energy to illegal aliens, are paying attention – and the AP shows that the Democrats are getting nervous.