Comrade de Blasio starts blaming Jews for New York's huge coronavirus death toll

For Comrade Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, blaming Jews for plagues, same as Medieval Europe in the past, is back.

According to the New York Post:

"Something absolutely unacceptable happened in Williamsburg tonite: a large funeral gathering in the middle of this pandemic," de Blasio wrote on Twitter.

"When I heard, I went there myself to ensure the crowd was dispersed. And what I saw WILL NOT be tolerated so long as we are fighting the Coronavirus," he said.

He then threatened to arrest them all:

"My message to the Jewish community, and all communities, is this simple: the time for warnings has passed," the mayor wrote.

"This is about stopping this disease and saving lives. Period."

This, given the size of New York's Jewish population, has the odor of Jew-hatred.

De Blasio was referring to a onetime funeral event in New York's Williamsburg neighborhood where grieving members of a tight-knit Jewish congregation came out on the streets to mourn the death of their rabbi, and yes, they stood too close together in numbers too great, even as they were all wearing masks.  We've seen similar with some Christian congregations, and as with this Jewish congregation, there were social distancing efforts that weren't entirely successful.

But de Blasio decided that Jews were to be singled out for New York's huge coronavirus problem. 

Part of the problem was that de Blasio was lumping all Jewish people all into a monolithic, undifferentiated group.  What happened in Williamsburg hardly reflected what is going on at all Jewish congregations.  Three days ago in Poway, Calif., for instance, at a memorial for a victim of a murderous mass shooting at the synagogue a year ago, the event was held entirely online

But instead of complaining about street gatherings in general, as if that's a big ongoing problem, he complained about the Jewish community in particular, painting it as a monolith, singling them out as problematic.  There are a lot of Jewish people in New York, and they come in every size, shape, style, level of observance, and ideological tinge.  As with Christians (think of how many varieties there are there), Jews span the spectrum.  And yes, there was one community that didn't seem to sufficiently socially distance at a onetime outdoor event for a funeral, same as we have seen with some Christian congregations elsewhere, as if that were the real problem. 

All it is is a smokescreen for some far bigger issues.

We didn't hear anything from de Blasio about the huge crowds that gathered in Central Park when the sun came out in recent days — no threats of arrests — nor did we hear anything from him regarding the city's packed subway cars, which spread COVID-19 pretty significantly without anyone doing anything about it.  It may even be something de Blasio can't do anything about, even if he were a creative man instead of a comrade.  Worse still, he didn't say anything as the mayor of a city when his state was forcing New York's nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients in the name of "fairness."  That's the biggest reason for New York's high coronavirus death toll: the man-made government-caused disaster at the nursing homes.

Much easier just to blame Jews and that one odd congregation that effectively held a temporary masked gathering on the streets in New York?  Much easier than confronting government failures. 

It comes against a bad background of anti-Semitic attack surging in the city based on Democrat policies.

And what the hell was he doing traveling there himself, spreading his own germs into the area, just to see something for himself?  As he points the finger at Jews, he then goes and does his part to violate social distancing himself.

That's because the name of his game is not safety; it's blaming Jews. 

Image credit: Gage Skidmore via FlickrCC BY-SA 2.0.

UPDATE FROM ANDREA WIDBURG: John Cardillo reminds everyone that de Blasio has a very different approach for Islam:

For Comrade Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, blaming Jews for plagues, same as Medieval Europe in the past, is back.

According to the New York Post:

"Something absolutely unacceptable happened in Williamsburg tonite: a large funeral gathering in the middle of this pandemic," de Blasio wrote on Twitter.

"When I heard, I went there myself to ensure the crowd was dispersed. And what I saw WILL NOT be tolerated so long as we are fighting the Coronavirus," he said.

He then threatened to arrest them all:

"My message to the Jewish community, and all communities, is this simple: the time for warnings has passed," the mayor wrote.

"This is about stopping this disease and saving lives. Period."

This, given the size of New York's Jewish population, has the odor of Jew-hatred.

De Blasio was referring to a onetime funeral event in New York's Williamsburg neighborhood where grieving members of a tight-knit Jewish congregation came out on the streets to mourn the death of their rabbi, and yes, they stood too close together in numbers too great, even as they were all wearing masks.  We've seen similar with some Christian congregations, and as with this Jewish congregation, there were social distancing efforts that weren't entirely successful.

But de Blasio decided that Jews were to be singled out for New York's huge coronavirus problem. 

Part of the problem was that de Blasio was lumping all Jewish people all into a monolithic, undifferentiated group.  What happened in Williamsburg hardly reflected what is going on at all Jewish congregations.  Three days ago in Poway, Calif., for instance, at a memorial for a victim of a murderous mass shooting at the synagogue a year ago, the event was held entirely online

But instead of complaining about street gatherings in general, as if that's a big ongoing problem, he complained about the Jewish community in particular, painting it as a monolith, singling them out as problematic.  There are a lot of Jewish people in New York, and they come in every size, shape, style, level of observance, and ideological tinge.  As with Christians (think of how many varieties there are there), Jews span the spectrum.  And yes, there was one community that didn't seem to sufficiently socially distance at a onetime outdoor event for a funeral, same as we have seen with some Christian congregations elsewhere, as if that were the real problem. 

All it is is a smokescreen for some far bigger issues.

We didn't hear anything from de Blasio about the huge crowds that gathered in Central Park when the sun came out in recent days — no threats of arrests — nor did we hear anything from him regarding the city's packed subway cars, which spread COVID-19 pretty significantly without anyone doing anything about it.  It may even be something de Blasio can't do anything about, even if he were a creative man instead of a comrade.  Worse still, he didn't say anything as the mayor of a city when his state was forcing New York's nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients in the name of "fairness."  That's the biggest reason for New York's high coronavirus death toll: the man-made government-caused disaster at the nursing homes.

Much easier just to blame Jews and that one odd congregation that effectively held a temporary masked gathering on the streets in New York?  Much easier than confronting government failures. 

It comes against a bad background of anti-Semitic attack surging in the city based on Democrat policies.

And what the hell was he doing traveling there himself, spreading his own germs into the area, just to see something for himself?  As he points the finger at Jews, he then goes and does his part to violate social distancing himself.

That's because the name of his game is not safety; it's blaming Jews. 

Image credit: Gage Skidmore via FlickrCC BY-SA 2.0.

UPDATE FROM ANDREA WIDBURG: John Cardillo reminds everyone that de Blasio has a very different approach for Islam: