With Biden the likely Democrat candidate, what does that mean for the election?

It's beginning to look as if numerous Democrat voters, having realized that Bernie wasn't kidding when he spent decades lavishing praise on totalitarian dictatorships, have decided that Joe Biden is the safer course.  It helped that the entire Democrat establishment threw its weight behind Biden once it became obvious that his relationship to Barack Obama still cast a sort of glow upon him.

The big question is whether that glow will last through to November.  It certainly helps Biden that the Democrat establishment, worried by how objectively successful Trump's presidency has been, is willing to destroy the American economy to defeat Donald Trump in November.

That is what the ginned up coronavirus panic is all about: not protecting people's health, but finding another "Hurricane Katrina" by which to bring down an increasingly popular president.  Just as the media were willing to lie about Katrina (remember the claimed cannibalism?), they're willing to exaggerate the risks of coronavirus, which is, when all is said and done, a slightly more dangerous flu than the last flu was.

Putting aside the whole coronavirus panic, it's questionable whether Biden can defeat Trump.  Here are some considerations:

Joe's confusion has gone far beyond his reputation for being a gaffe machine.  Those who have worked with elderly people who suffer from serious cognitive decline may recognize the mistakes and the increasingly ineffective attempts at recovery.  Here's yet another compilation of Biden's problems:

There are rumors circulating that Biden's speeches and public appearances are getting shorter on the theory that the less he says, the less likely he is to say something that exposes his diminished mental stature.  Thus, while Biden was speaking for as long as an hour at a time in 2019, when he began his campaign, his speeches are now clocking in at 15 minutes or less.

The problem for Trump is how to expose Biden's issues during debates without looking as if he's picking on a senile old man.  Trump will be handicapped by the fact that the media will cover for Biden to the bitter end.  This means that no matter how confused Biden his or how delicately Trump handles him, the media will present Trump as a monstrous bully.  The best thing Trump can do is to respond substantively to Biden, without any derogatory or comical editorials about his saying nonsensical things.  This will highlight the chasm between Trump's sharpness and Biden's decline.

A significant problem Biden will have is the fact that voters aren't wildly enthused about him.  He's the guy you vote for when the other guy is even worse.  Overall, though, Biden's supporters aren't as enthusiastic as Bernie's:

Going into the presidential election, Biden is going to have the same problem as he did in the primary: In addition to getting votes from those who affirmatively like him, he's going to have to get out the votes of those who dislike and fear Trump.

Whether not liking Trump is going to rouse people to leave their homes and vote is questionable.  This is especially true considering that a lot of people who hate Trump — and are very loud about that hatred — still secretly appreciate what he's done, especially with regard to the economy.  They're the people who will rant (i.e., virtue-signal) against him on Facebook and then, on November 3, "forget" to go to the polls to vote for Biden.

A lot also depends on the person whom Biden chooses for his vice president.  Even Biden's supporters have their doubts about his ability, physically or mentally, to last in the office if elected.  That means that his vice president may be the real power behind the throne or may ascend to the throne.

Mike Huckabee worries that Michelle Obama is the designated person to take office in Biden's place:

Plan A: Biden gets nomination, names Michelle as running mate; he crashes and burns before election; Michelle becomes the candidate. If she wins, Obama machine gets back in.

Plan B: Biden gets nomination, names Michelle as running mate; if they win, he is "retired" and Michelle assumes power. Obama machine gets back in.

Plan C: Biden gets nomination, names Michelle as running mate; if they win, Biden remains as figurehead for a time and Obama machine gets back in.

Plan D: No one has enough delegates; it's a brokered convention; Michelle ends up on ticket in either the #1 or #2 spot; if they win, Obama machine gets back in.

Plan E: Biden crashes and burns BEFORE convention; Michelle is drafted at convention; if she wins, Obama machine gets back in.

Many others believe that Hillary envisions herself in the role Huckabee has outlined for Michelle Obama.

Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar are also being bandied about as possible running mates.  Their poor showing in the primaries, though, makes it questionable whether they'll contribute anything to the ticket other than placating a few feminists and standing in as the 21st century's Geraldine Ferraro.

One certainty: Buy popcorn.  The election season promises to be entertaining. 

It's beginning to look as if numerous Democrat voters, having realized that Bernie wasn't kidding when he spent decades lavishing praise on totalitarian dictatorships, have decided that Joe Biden is the safer course.  It helped that the entire Democrat establishment threw its weight behind Biden once it became obvious that his relationship to Barack Obama still cast a sort of glow upon him.

The big question is whether that glow will last through to November.  It certainly helps Biden that the Democrat establishment, worried by how objectively successful Trump's presidency has been, is willing to destroy the American economy to defeat Donald Trump in November.

That is what the ginned up coronavirus panic is all about: not protecting people's health, but finding another "Hurricane Katrina" by which to bring down an increasingly popular president.  Just as the media were willing to lie about Katrina (remember the claimed cannibalism?), they're willing to exaggerate the risks of coronavirus, which is, when all is said and done, a slightly more dangerous flu than the last flu was.

Putting aside the whole coronavirus panic, it's questionable whether Biden can defeat Trump.  Here are some considerations:

Joe's confusion has gone far beyond his reputation for being a gaffe machine.  Those who have worked with elderly people who suffer from serious cognitive decline may recognize the mistakes and the increasingly ineffective attempts at recovery.  Here's yet another compilation of Biden's problems:

There are rumors circulating that Biden's speeches and public appearances are getting shorter on the theory that the less he says, the less likely he is to say something that exposes his diminished mental stature.  Thus, while Biden was speaking for as long as an hour at a time in 2019, when he began his campaign, his speeches are now clocking in at 15 minutes or less.

The problem for Trump is how to expose Biden's issues during debates without looking as if he's picking on a senile old man.  Trump will be handicapped by the fact that the media will cover for Biden to the bitter end.  This means that no matter how confused Biden his or how delicately Trump handles him, the media will present Trump as a monstrous bully.  The best thing Trump can do is to respond substantively to Biden, without any derogatory or comical editorials about his saying nonsensical things.  This will highlight the chasm between Trump's sharpness and Biden's decline.

A significant problem Biden will have is the fact that voters aren't wildly enthused about him.  He's the guy you vote for when the other guy is even worse.  Overall, though, Biden's supporters aren't as enthusiastic as Bernie's:

Going into the presidential election, Biden is going to have the same problem as he did in the primary: In addition to getting votes from those who affirmatively like him, he's going to have to get out the votes of those who dislike and fear Trump.

Whether not liking Trump is going to rouse people to leave their homes and vote is questionable.  This is especially true considering that a lot of people who hate Trump — and are very loud about that hatred — still secretly appreciate what he's done, especially with regard to the economy.  They're the people who will rant (i.e., virtue-signal) against him on Facebook and then, on November 3, "forget" to go to the polls to vote for Biden.

A lot also depends on the person whom Biden chooses for his vice president.  Even Biden's supporters have their doubts about his ability, physically or mentally, to last in the office if elected.  That means that his vice president may be the real power behind the throne or may ascend to the throne.

Mike Huckabee worries that Michelle Obama is the designated person to take office in Biden's place:

Plan A: Biden gets nomination, names Michelle as running mate; he crashes and burns before election; Michelle becomes the candidate. If she wins, Obama machine gets back in.

Plan B: Biden gets nomination, names Michelle as running mate; if they win, he is "retired" and Michelle assumes power. Obama machine gets back in.

Plan C: Biden gets nomination, names Michelle as running mate; if they win, Biden remains as figurehead for a time and Obama machine gets back in.

Plan D: No one has enough delegates; it's a brokered convention; Michelle ends up on ticket in either the #1 or #2 spot; if they win, Obama machine gets back in.

Plan E: Biden crashes and burns BEFORE convention; Michelle is drafted at convention; if she wins, Obama machine gets back in.

Many others believe that Hillary envisions herself in the role Huckabee has outlined for Michelle Obama.

Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar are also being bandied about as possible running mates.  Their poor showing in the primaries, though, makes it questionable whether they'll contribute anything to the ticket other than placating a few feminists and standing in as the 21st century's Geraldine Ferraro.

One certainty: Buy popcorn.  The election season promises to be entertaining.