When it comes to coronavirus, were Democrats fiddling while the virus burned?

After first claiming that Donald Trump was overreacting to the coronavirus by banning flights from China, the Democrat establishment settled on its preferred narrative: Trump was both useless and incompetent.  The media have peddled this narrative relentlessly for over a month, gleefully trying to destroy Trump's reputation without any regard for the costs of scaring Americans and possibly wiping out the economy.  It turns out, though, that the Democrats may have been the problem all along.

On March 8, Dan Scavino, an assistant to the president and director of social media at the White House, tweeted out a poster showing Trump playing the violin.  The caption stated "My next piece is called . . . nothing can stop what's coming."  Trump retweeted it, adding in his tweet, "Who knows what this means, but it sounds good to me!"

Democrats were sure what it meant: Trump was Nero, fiddling while the American Rome burned around him, with the smoke from the coronavirus rising to the skies.

Joel Pollak, though, offers compelling evidence that it was the Democrats who played Nero in this drama.  The calendar shows that, as coronavirus deaths soared in China, and Chinese people from the Wuhan region started traveling to America, the Democrats forced the nation's attention onto the spurious impeachment trial:

The timeline of the two developments — impeachment and coronavirus — is shocking, and reveals the true cost of hyper-partisanship.

  • January 11: Chinese state media report the first known death from an illness originating in the Wuhan market.
  • January 15: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds a vote to send articles of impeachment to the Senate. Pelosi and House Democrats celebrate the "solemn" occasion with a signing ceremony, using commemorative pens.
  • January 21: The first person with coronavirus arrives in the United States from China, where he had been in Wuhan.
  • January 23: The House impeachment managers make their opening arguments for removing President Trump.
  • January 23: China closes off the city of Wuhan completely to slow the spread of coronavirus to the rest of China.
  • January 30: Senators begin asking two days of questions of both sides in the president's impeachment trial.
  • January 30: The World Health Organization declares a global health emergency as coronavirus continues to spread.
  • January 31: The Senate holds a vote on whether to allow further witnesses and documents in the impeachment trial.
  • January 31: President Trump declares a national health emergency and imposes a ban on travel to and from China. Former Vice President Joe Biden calls Trump's decision "hysterical xenophobia … and fear-mongering."
  • February 2: The first death from coronavirus outside China is reported in the Philippines.
  • February 3: House impeachment managers begin closing arguments, calling Trump a threat to national security.
  • February 4: President Trump talks about coronavirus in his State of the Union address; Pelosi rips up every page.
  • February 5: The Senate votes to acquit President Trump on both articles of impeachment, 52-48 and 53-47.
  • February 5: House Democrats finally take up coronavirus in the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia.

While Trump should have been able to focus tightly on the risks the coronavirus presented to America, he was forced to direct his attention to a show trial.  Despite that, he did manage to close the border, which proves to have been a brilliant decision.  Dr. Anthony Fauci, while on Joe Scarborough's show, explained how vital Trump's action was:

Dr. Anthony Fauci: Clearly, early on, we made a travel ban with regard to China. That was a very smart move right there because what that did was prevent a major influx from China. Today, the new China is Europe. Because Europe now is the major element, the major geographic component that is now seeding other countries throughout the world. And that's the reason why we made the very difficult, but appropriate decision, to have a travel ban on the European countries, so we are definitely ahead of the curve on that.

Trump understood that the more he could slow the virus's spread, the more time there was to change social behaviors, develop treatments, and create vaccines.

It was the Democrats, who ignored the problem and impeded Trump's ability to act, who put Americans at risk.  God forbid the virus's spread results in a high body count, but if that happens, it was the Democrats who did the deadly fiddling.

After first claiming that Donald Trump was overreacting to the coronavirus by banning flights from China, the Democrat establishment settled on its preferred narrative: Trump was both useless and incompetent.  The media have peddled this narrative relentlessly for over a month, gleefully trying to destroy Trump's reputation without any regard for the costs of scaring Americans and possibly wiping out the economy.  It turns out, though, that the Democrats may have been the problem all along.

On March 8, Dan Scavino, an assistant to the president and director of social media at the White House, tweeted out a poster showing Trump playing the violin.  The caption stated "My next piece is called . . . nothing can stop what's coming."  Trump retweeted it, adding in his tweet, "Who knows what this means, but it sounds good to me!"

Democrats were sure what it meant: Trump was Nero, fiddling while the American Rome burned around him, with the smoke from the coronavirus rising to the skies.

Joel Pollak, though, offers compelling evidence that it was the Democrats who played Nero in this drama.  The calendar shows that, as coronavirus deaths soared in China, and Chinese people from the Wuhan region started traveling to America, the Democrats forced the nation's attention onto the spurious impeachment trial:

The timeline of the two developments — impeachment and coronavirus — is shocking, and reveals the true cost of hyper-partisanship.

  • January 11: Chinese state media report the first known death from an illness originating in the Wuhan market.
  • January 15: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds a vote to send articles of impeachment to the Senate. Pelosi and House Democrats celebrate the "solemn" occasion with a signing ceremony, using commemorative pens.
  • January 21: The first person with coronavirus arrives in the United States from China, where he had been in Wuhan.
  • January 23: The House impeachment managers make their opening arguments for removing President Trump.
  • January 23: China closes off the city of Wuhan completely to slow the spread of coronavirus to the rest of China.
  • January 30: Senators begin asking two days of questions of both sides in the president's impeachment trial.
  • January 30: The World Health Organization declares a global health emergency as coronavirus continues to spread.
  • January 31: The Senate holds a vote on whether to allow further witnesses and documents in the impeachment trial.
  • January 31: President Trump declares a national health emergency and imposes a ban on travel to and from China. Former Vice President Joe Biden calls Trump's decision "hysterical xenophobia … and fear-mongering."
  • February 2: The first death from coronavirus outside China is reported in the Philippines.
  • February 3: House impeachment managers begin closing arguments, calling Trump a threat to national security.
  • February 4: President Trump talks about coronavirus in his State of the Union address; Pelosi rips up every page.
  • February 5: The Senate votes to acquit President Trump on both articles of impeachment, 52-48 and 53-47.
  • February 5: House Democrats finally take up coronavirus in the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia.

While Trump should have been able to focus tightly on the risks the coronavirus presented to America, he was forced to direct his attention to a show trial.  Despite that, he did manage to close the border, which proves to have been a brilliant decision.  Dr. Anthony Fauci, while on Joe Scarborough's show, explained how vital Trump's action was:

Dr. Anthony Fauci: Clearly, early on, we made a travel ban with regard to China. That was a very smart move right there because what that did was prevent a major influx from China. Today, the new China is Europe. Because Europe now is the major element, the major geographic component that is now seeding other countries throughout the world. And that's the reason why we made the very difficult, but appropriate decision, to have a travel ban on the European countries, so we are definitely ahead of the curve on that.

Trump understood that the more he could slow the virus's spread, the more time there was to change social behaviors, develop treatments, and create vaccines.

It was the Democrats, who ignored the problem and impeded Trump's ability to act, who put Americans at risk.  God forbid the virus's spread results in a high body count, but if that happens, it was the Democrats who did the deadly fiddling.