Trump unloads on an NBC reporter who attacks, interrupts, and fights with him

Having failed with the Russia hoax and the Ukraine hoax, the Democrat establishment slipped seamlessly into blaming President Trump for the coronavirus's entry into and affect on America.  During his now daily press briefings, Trump is fighting back against the reporters and shining a light on their efforts to frighten, not inform Americans.

On Friday, NBC's Peter Alexander decided to pick a fight with President Trump regarding repurposing existing drugs to see if they can speedily be put into place to fight the coronavirus.  It began when the president said he was very pleased with the way in which Chloroquine was getting fast-tracked through the FDA to be used for a reason other than its approved usage as a malaria treatment.

Trump pointed out the advantage of knowing all about the drug and its safety record.  He did not say the drug is a magic pill.  Instead, he said it should certainly be tried and that he feels optimistic that something good will come of the trial.

Alexander was having none of that.  Rather, he accused Trump of being too positive, an attribute that, in Alexander's twisted media mind, is frightening.  After repeatedly interrupting and talking over the president, Alexander finally said people are sick, dying, and afraid and asked Trump what he was actually doing about it.

Think about that: in Alexander's mind, all the things that President Trump has done — fast-tracking possible medicines, working with America's governors, speedily closing the borders to new infections, educating and assuring the people, and myriad other steps since China finally admitted it had a problem — isn't doing anything.  How can a person like this be taken seriously?

Fortunately, Trump does not take these stuffed suits seriously.  He did not take Alexander's question at face value, which would have given it a legitimacy it didn't deserve.  Instead, Trump lit into Alexander, calling him a "terrible reporter" and accusing him of failing to report the facts and, instead, just relying on sensationalism.  "The American people are looking for answers," he said, "and they're looking for hope, and you're doing sensationalism."

Listening to the debate between the two and seeing Alexander's rank disrespect for the American president, especially when contrasted with Trump's honest information and his willingness to be flexible that he showed about new treatments, should be a mind-opening experience.  The drive-by media will show the footage to shame Trump, but they might discover that Americans, rather than disagreeing with Trump, think he's correct.

By the way, be sure to watch the little pantomime in which Alexander engages when the president goes after him.  "Who me?" he pantomimes.  It's patently false outrage, which fits comfortably with everything else fake about this NBC "reporter."

ALEXANDER: About the possible therapies yesterday, Mr. President you said that they were for quote immediate delivery, immediate, we heard —

TRUMP: Yes, we're ordering. Yes, we have millions of units ordered. Bayer is one of the companies, as you know. A big company, very big, very great company. Millions of units are ordered and we're going to see what happens. We're going to be talking to the governors about it and the FDA is working on it right now.

The advantage is that it has been prescribed for a totally different problem, but it has been prescribed for many years and everybody knows the levels of the negatives and the positives.

But I will say that I am a man that comes from a very positive school when it comes to, in particular, one of these drugs. And we'll see how it works out, Peter. I'm not saying it will, but I think that people may be surprised.

By the way, that would be a game-changer. But we're going to know very soon. But we have ordered millions of units. It's being ordered from Bayer and there is another a couple of companies also that do it.

ALEXANDER: But Dr. Fauci said there is no magic drug for coronavirus right now, which you would agree. I guess on this issue. . . .

[Crosstalk]

TRUMP. I disagree. Maybe and maybe not. Maybe there is, maybe there isn't. We have to see. We're gonna know.

ALEXANDER (interrupting the President): Is it possible that your impulse to put a positive spin on things may be giving Americans a false sense of preparedness right now.

TRUMP: No, I don't think so. I don't think so. I think it's got. . . .

[ALEXANDER again interrupts the president causing unintelligible cross talk.]

TRUMP: Such a lovely question. Look, it may work and it may not work, and I agree with the doctor, what he said. May work, may not work.

I feel good about it. It's all it is. It's just a feeling, you know, I'm a smart guy. I feel good about it. And we're gonna see, we're gonna see soon enough.

And we have certainly some very big samples of people. Have you looked at the people? You have a lot of people that are in big trouble and this is not a drug that. . . ."

Obviously, I think I can speak for a lot of, from a lot of experience because it's been out there for over 20 years, so it's not a drug that you have a huge amount of danger with. It's not like a brand new drug that's been just created that may have an unbelievable monumental effect, like kill you.

We're gonna know very soon and I can tell you the FDA is working very hard to get it out. Right now, in terms of malaria, if you want it, you can have a prescription. You get a prescription and, by the way, it's been very effective. It works.

I have a feeling you may . . . And I'm not being overly optimistic or pessimistic. I sure as hell think we ought to give it a try. I mean there's been some interesting things happened, and some good, very good things. Let's see what happens. We have nothing to lose. You know the expression "what the hell do you have to lose?"

ALEXANDER (interrupting the President again): What do you say to the Americans who are scared, though, I guess. Nearly 200 dead, 14,000 who are sick, millions, as you witnessed, who are scared right now. What do you say to Americans who are watching right now who are scared?

TRUMP: I say that you're a terrible reporter, that's what I say. I think that's a very nasty question, and I think it's a very bad signal that you're putting out to the American people. The American people are looking for answers and they're looking for hope, and you're doing sensationalism. 

And the same with NBC and Comcast. I don't call it Comcast. I call it "Con-cast." Let me just tell you something: That's really bad reporting and you ought to get back to reporting, instead of sensationalism.

Let's see if it works. It might, and it might not. I happen to feel good about it, but who knows. I've been right — a lot. Let's see what happens.

Having failed with the Russia hoax and the Ukraine hoax, the Democrat establishment slipped seamlessly into blaming President Trump for the coronavirus's entry into and affect on America.  During his now daily press briefings, Trump is fighting back against the reporters and shining a light on their efforts to frighten, not inform Americans.

On Friday, NBC's Peter Alexander decided to pick a fight with President Trump regarding repurposing existing drugs to see if they can speedily be put into place to fight the coronavirus.  It began when the president said he was very pleased with the way in which Chloroquine was getting fast-tracked through the FDA to be used for a reason other than its approved usage as a malaria treatment.

Trump pointed out the advantage of knowing all about the drug and its safety record.  He did not say the drug is a magic pill.  Instead, he said it should certainly be tried and that he feels optimistic that something good will come of the trial.

Alexander was having none of that.  Rather, he accused Trump of being too positive, an attribute that, in Alexander's twisted media mind, is frightening.  After repeatedly interrupting and talking over the president, Alexander finally said people are sick, dying, and afraid and asked Trump what he was actually doing about it.

Think about that: in Alexander's mind, all the things that President Trump has done — fast-tracking possible medicines, working with America's governors, speedily closing the borders to new infections, educating and assuring the people, and myriad other steps since China finally admitted it had a problem — isn't doing anything.  How can a person like this be taken seriously?

Fortunately, Trump does not take these stuffed suits seriously.  He did not take Alexander's question at face value, which would have given it a legitimacy it didn't deserve.  Instead, Trump lit into Alexander, calling him a "terrible reporter" and accusing him of failing to report the facts and, instead, just relying on sensationalism.  "The American people are looking for answers," he said, "and they're looking for hope, and you're doing sensationalism."

Listening to the debate between the two and seeing Alexander's rank disrespect for the American president, especially when contrasted with Trump's honest information and his willingness to be flexible that he showed about new treatments, should be a mind-opening experience.  The drive-by media will show the footage to shame Trump, but they might discover that Americans, rather than disagreeing with Trump, think he's correct.

By the way, be sure to watch the little pantomime in which Alexander engages when the president goes after him.  "Who me?" he pantomimes.  It's patently false outrage, which fits comfortably with everything else fake about this NBC "reporter."

ALEXANDER: About the possible therapies yesterday, Mr. President you said that they were for quote immediate delivery, immediate, we heard —

TRUMP: Yes, we're ordering. Yes, we have millions of units ordered. Bayer is one of the companies, as you know. A big company, very big, very great company. Millions of units are ordered and we're going to see what happens. We're going to be talking to the governors about it and the FDA is working on it right now.

The advantage is that it has been prescribed for a totally different problem, but it has been prescribed for many years and everybody knows the levels of the negatives and the positives.

But I will say that I am a man that comes from a very positive school when it comes to, in particular, one of these drugs. And we'll see how it works out, Peter. I'm not saying it will, but I think that people may be surprised.

By the way, that would be a game-changer. But we're going to know very soon. But we have ordered millions of units. It's being ordered from Bayer and there is another a couple of companies also that do it.

ALEXANDER: But Dr. Fauci said there is no magic drug for coronavirus right now, which you would agree. I guess on this issue. . . .

[Crosstalk]

TRUMP. I disagree. Maybe and maybe not. Maybe there is, maybe there isn't. We have to see. We're gonna know.

ALEXANDER (interrupting the President): Is it possible that your impulse to put a positive spin on things may be giving Americans a false sense of preparedness right now.

TRUMP: No, I don't think so. I don't think so. I think it's got. . . .

[ALEXANDER again interrupts the president causing unintelligible cross talk.]

TRUMP: Such a lovely question. Look, it may work and it may not work, and I agree with the doctor, what he said. May work, may not work.

I feel good about it. It's all it is. It's just a feeling, you know, I'm a smart guy. I feel good about it. And we're gonna see, we're gonna see soon enough.

And we have certainly some very big samples of people. Have you looked at the people? You have a lot of people that are in big trouble and this is not a drug that. . . ."

Obviously, I think I can speak for a lot of, from a lot of experience because it's been out there for over 20 years, so it's not a drug that you have a huge amount of danger with. It's not like a brand new drug that's been just created that may have an unbelievable monumental effect, like kill you.

We're gonna know very soon and I can tell you the FDA is working very hard to get it out. Right now, in terms of malaria, if you want it, you can have a prescription. You get a prescription and, by the way, it's been very effective. It works.

I have a feeling you may . . . And I'm not being overly optimistic or pessimistic. I sure as hell think we ought to give it a try. I mean there's been some interesting things happened, and some good, very good things. Let's see what happens. We have nothing to lose. You know the expression "what the hell do you have to lose?"

ALEXANDER (interrupting the President again): What do you say to the Americans who are scared, though, I guess. Nearly 200 dead, 14,000 who are sick, millions, as you witnessed, who are scared right now. What do you say to Americans who are watching right now who are scared?

TRUMP: I say that you're a terrible reporter, that's what I say. I think that's a very nasty question, and I think it's a very bad signal that you're putting out to the American people. The American people are looking for answers and they're looking for hope, and you're doing sensationalism. 

And the same with NBC and Comcast. I don't call it Comcast. I call it "Con-cast." Let me just tell you something: That's really bad reporting and you ought to get back to reporting, instead of sensationalism.

Let's see if it works. It might, and it might not. I happen to feel good about it, but who knows. I've been right — a lot. Let's see what happens.