The latest viral videos of Mike Bloomberg highlight his disconnect from humanity

Three videos emerged of Mike Bloomberg this week, the first showing him explaining why he needs armed guards while ordinary people should be disarmed; the second showing him grabbing food in a public place, licking his fingers, and then touching other food; and the third seeing him explain to a reporter (incorrectly) that "Tejas" is the Spanish word for Texas.  In each case, his sense of himself as someone separate from the little people oozes out of him.

Before viewing the videos, it's worth remembering how Bloomberg made his money: an extremely bright man who started as an investment banker, in the early 1980s, he designed a computer system that would consolidate real-time market data.  He then spent the next three decades making money hand over fist selling this real-time market data.  Bloomberg sat at the top of this vast information empire, issuing diktats to people downriver from him.

One suspects that Bloomberg was seldom challenged.  Even when he was mayor, despite his "bullpen" floor plan in the mayor's office, he seems to have been a top-down manager.  He told people what to do, and they did it.  His was an autocratic style.

Donald Trump made his money differently.  He was a scrapper in the world of high-revenue real estate development.  Trump was on the ground, constantly dealing with contractors, engineers, developers, and politicians, some of whom were friends, some foes, and some taking both roles on different days.  Trump's wealth was never disconnected from people.  He had to go out every day and charm, fight, finagle, negotiate, and in general figure out the best strategy for achieving his objectives.

With that in mind, you can appreciate the first video, which shows Bloomberg essentially telling voters he (Bloomberg) is entitled to a gun because he's more important and richer than the ordinary citizen:

 

 

In the second video, despite living in a time of virus paranoia, Bloomberg treats food and food containers as if he's the only person in the room:

Trump, who is a germophobe, chimed in on this one:

In the third video, a condescending Bloomberg, who is New York through and through, tells a reporter that Tejas is the Spanish word for Texas.  (He's wrong.)  Perhaps he means to be charming, but he’s so condescending and inappropriate it makes your teeth hurt watching it:

Why does Bloomberg's distance from ordinary human beings matter?  Because, thanks to Biden's surge, Bernie's surge, and Bloomberg's little American Samoa surge, Bloomberg is still lurking in the wings as the billionaire who can buy the Democrat party at a brokered convention.  He may be weird, but it would be a mistake to underestimate him.

 

 

Three videos emerged of Mike Bloomberg this week, the first showing him explaining why he needs armed guards while ordinary people should be disarmed; the second showing him grabbing food in a public place, licking his fingers, and then touching other food; and the third seeing him explain to a reporter (incorrectly) that "Tejas" is the Spanish word for Texas.  In each case, his sense of himself as someone separate from the little people oozes out of him.

Before viewing the videos, it's worth remembering how Bloomberg made his money: an extremely bright man who started as an investment banker, in the early 1980s, he designed a computer system that would consolidate real-time market data.  He then spent the next three decades making money hand over fist selling this real-time market data.  Bloomberg sat at the top of this vast information empire, issuing diktats to people downriver from him.

One suspects that Bloomberg was seldom challenged.  Even when he was mayor, despite his "bullpen" floor plan in the mayor's office, he seems to have been a top-down manager.  He told people what to do, and they did it.  His was an autocratic style.

Donald Trump made his money differently.  He was a scrapper in the world of high-revenue real estate development.  Trump was on the ground, constantly dealing with contractors, engineers, developers, and politicians, some of whom were friends, some foes, and some taking both roles on different days.  Trump's wealth was never disconnected from people.  He had to go out every day and charm, fight, finagle, negotiate, and in general figure out the best strategy for achieving his objectives.

With that in mind, you can appreciate the first video, which shows Bloomberg essentially telling voters he (Bloomberg) is entitled to a gun because he's more important and richer than the ordinary citizen:

 

 

In the second video, despite living in a time of virus paranoia, Bloomberg treats food and food containers as if he's the only person in the room:

Trump, who is a germophobe, chimed in on this one:

In the third video, a condescending Bloomberg, who is New York through and through, tells a reporter that Tejas is the Spanish word for Texas.  (He's wrong.)  Perhaps he means to be charming, but he’s so condescending and inappropriate it makes your teeth hurt watching it:

Why does Bloomberg's distance from ordinary human beings matter?  Because, thanks to Biden's surge, Bernie's surge, and Bloomberg's little American Samoa surge, Bloomberg is still lurking in the wings as the billionaire who can buy the Democrat party at a brokered convention.  He may be weird, but it would be a mistake to underestimate him.