Nancy Pelosi's nightmare come true: Trump — and Republicans — soar in Gallup post-impeachment poll

Just in time for Joe Biden's Super Tuesday II victory dance, a new Gallup poll shows that both President Trump and congressional Republicans have sharply risen in voter estimation the wake of the Democrats' failed impeachment stunt.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — More Americans approve of the job congressional Republicans are doing than of congressional Democrats' performance — 40% vs. 35%. The rating for Republicans in Congress has risen six percentage points since late October, before the impeachment of President Donald Trump in the U.S. House of Representatives. Over the same period, congressional Democrats' approval rating has edged down three points and disapproval has climbed five points, from 57% to 62%.

In general, congressional Democrats have historically had slightly higher job approval ratings than congressional Republicans. The average approval rating since 1999, when Gallup began periodically tracking both, is 41% for the Democrats in Congress and 35% for the Republicans in Congress. Yet, Republicans have edged out Democrats a number of times over the 21-year trend.

The latest readings for these measures, from a Feb. 17-28 poll, are Gallup's first since the Dec. 18 impeachment of Trump in the U.S. House of Representatives and his subsequent acquittal in the U.S. Senate on Feb. 5. 

A look at Gallup's chart (click here) shows a sudden and sharp crisscrossing upward of approval for the Republicans over the Democrats, coming exactly when the impeachment act was in full swing.  As if to underscore the trend, note that Mitt Romney has taken a hit, too, falling in the situation of more Democrats than Republicans thinking well of him.  Mitch McConnell's favorables, in contrast, have gone up.

This signals that voters are noticing, many going right down to the legislative level to give opinions.

That's exactly what House majority leader Nancy Pelosi feared all along, as she attempted to ward off impeachment, trying to tell Democrats that impeaching Trump was "not worth it."  After that, she got knocked over by the "squad" faction of the Democrats and let Rep. Adam Schiff do his thing, and not only did the impeachment fail, but all they have to show for it now is falling poll numbers for themselves — and a likely booting from power.

Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of snakes.  Now as they seek to retake the White House, they're doing it with a side of crow pie.

Photo illustration by Monica Showalter with use of public domain sources.

Just in time for Joe Biden's Super Tuesday II victory dance, a new Gallup poll shows that both President Trump and congressional Republicans have sharply risen in voter estimation the wake of the Democrats' failed impeachment stunt.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — More Americans approve of the job congressional Republicans are doing than of congressional Democrats' performance — 40% vs. 35%. The rating for Republicans in Congress has risen six percentage points since late October, before the impeachment of President Donald Trump in the U.S. House of Representatives. Over the same period, congressional Democrats' approval rating has edged down three points and disapproval has climbed five points, from 57% to 62%.

In general, congressional Democrats have historically had slightly higher job approval ratings than congressional Republicans. The average approval rating since 1999, when Gallup began periodically tracking both, is 41% for the Democrats in Congress and 35% for the Republicans in Congress. Yet, Republicans have edged out Democrats a number of times over the 21-year trend.

The latest readings for these measures, from a Feb. 17-28 poll, are Gallup's first since the Dec. 18 impeachment of Trump in the U.S. House of Representatives and his subsequent acquittal in the U.S. Senate on Feb. 5. 

A look at Gallup's chart (click here) shows a sudden and sharp crisscrossing upward of approval for the Republicans over the Democrats, coming exactly when the impeachment act was in full swing.  As if to underscore the trend, note that Mitt Romney has taken a hit, too, falling in the situation of more Democrats than Republicans thinking well of him.  Mitch McConnell's favorables, in contrast, have gone up.

This signals that voters are noticing, many going right down to the legislative level to give opinions.

That's exactly what House majority leader Nancy Pelosi feared all along, as she attempted to ward off impeachment, trying to tell Democrats that impeaching Trump was "not worth it."  After that, she got knocked over by the "squad" faction of the Democrats and let Rep. Adam Schiff do his thing, and not only did the impeachment fail, but all they have to show for it now is falling poll numbers for themselves — and a likely booting from power.

Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of snakes.  Now as they seek to retake the White House, they're doing it with a side of crow pie.

Photo illustration by Monica Showalter with use of public domain sources.