Biden's Super Tuesday performance...no big deal

It is basic.  Primary elections are different from general elections in terms of the quantity and quality of the turnout.  Quantity is straightforward.  It's the number of people bothering to vote.  Even in highly contested primaries, the turnout is significantly lower than the pending general election.  This brings us to quality.  Those participating in a primary are in general far more politically engaged than the ordinary person.  As such, they tend to be affiliated and identify with their party.  Yes, there are crossover voters in some states, but this doesn't negate what has just been said.

As to the Democrat primaries on Super Tuesday, Joe Biden did surprisingly well.  He even won states and delegates where he didn't campaign or spend much money.  Why?  A big part of the reason is that the various Democrat party state establishments cranked up their machines to get party faithful to go out and vote for Joe.  This is done through the party's network and by mailings and phone messages, which especially targets those party members likely the vote.  That such an effort wasn't in the news doesn't mean that it didn't  happen or that it wasn't effective.

An example of this from the Republican side was the Ohio primary in 2016.  Then, John Kasich, governor of Ohio, won 47 percent of the vote and  66 delegates to Donald Trump's 36 percent and zero delegates.  This was the only primary Kasich won.  Everywhere else around the country, Kasich was an embarrassing flop.  What accounted for Kasich's anomalous win in the Buckeye state?  True, he was a "favorite son" in Ohio, but far more significant is that the Son of the Postman had the entire GOP organization pushing for him in every county of the state.  This is mentioned to illustrate the power parties can have in primaries when they get behind a certain candidate.  And by the way, Trump went on to defeat Hillary Clinton by over 8 percent in Ohio that November despite Kasich's ankle-biting all the way.  Such is a difference between a primary and a general election. 

Something like this is what happened with Lazy Joe.  That Biden did much better than expected on Super Tuesday by no means translates into voting strength in November.  All it attests to is the power of the Democrat machines in certain primary states.  And even at that, Bernie Sanders was still far from being KOed.  The Democrat primary fight goes on. 

The question can be asked: how, then, did Trump prevail over the Republican establishment in 2016?  The answer in a nutshell is that Trump is unique.  He is charismatic.  In 2016, he communicated directly to the people and over the heads of both the media and the GOP party establishment.  This might look simple, but precious few could pull it off.  Bernie Sanders is a bit like this with his followers, which is why the Democrat primary is still a horse race.

Despite the spin of the liberal media, Super Tuesday did not change much.  Biden is still a highly flawed candidate.  He's the same shallow individual he always was.  Should Biden be the Democrat nominee, his appeal will be limited to mostly die-hard Democrats and Trump-haters of various stripes.  This will not be enough to unseat the president.  And given Biden's impaired mental state and the stench of corruption associated with him, the man could be turned into a blubbering mess long before Election Day.

Image: Marc Nozell via Flickr.

It is basic.  Primary elections are different from general elections in terms of the quantity and quality of the turnout.  Quantity is straightforward.  It's the number of people bothering to vote.  Even in highly contested primaries, the turnout is significantly lower than the pending general election.  This brings us to quality.  Those participating in a primary are in general far more politically engaged than the ordinary person.  As such, they tend to be affiliated and identify with their party.  Yes, there are crossover voters in some states, but this doesn't negate what has just been said.

As to the Democrat primaries on Super Tuesday, Joe Biden did surprisingly well.  He even won states and delegates where he didn't campaign or spend much money.  Why?  A big part of the reason is that the various Democrat party state establishments cranked up their machines to get party faithful to go out and vote for Joe.  This is done through the party's network and by mailings and phone messages, which especially targets those party members likely the vote.  That such an effort wasn't in the news doesn't mean that it didn't  happen or that it wasn't effective.

An example of this from the Republican side was the Ohio primary in 2016.  Then, John Kasich, governor of Ohio, won 47 percent of the vote and  66 delegates to Donald Trump's 36 percent and zero delegates.  This was the only primary Kasich won.  Everywhere else around the country, Kasich was an embarrassing flop.  What accounted for Kasich's anomalous win in the Buckeye state?  True, he was a "favorite son" in Ohio, but far more significant is that the Son of the Postman had the entire GOP organization pushing for him in every county of the state.  This is mentioned to illustrate the power parties can have in primaries when they get behind a certain candidate.  And by the way, Trump went on to defeat Hillary Clinton by over 8 percent in Ohio that November despite Kasich's ankle-biting all the way.  Such is a difference between a primary and a general election. 

Something like this is what happened with Lazy Joe.  That Biden did much better than expected on Super Tuesday by no means translates into voting strength in November.  All it attests to is the power of the Democrat machines in certain primary states.  And even at that, Bernie Sanders was still far from being KOed.  The Democrat primary fight goes on. 

The question can be asked: how, then, did Trump prevail over the Republican establishment in 2016?  The answer in a nutshell is that Trump is unique.  He is charismatic.  In 2016, he communicated directly to the people and over the heads of both the media and the GOP party establishment.  This might look simple, but precious few could pull it off.  Bernie Sanders is a bit like this with his followers, which is why the Democrat primary is still a horse race.

Despite the spin of the liberal media, Super Tuesday did not change much.  Biden is still a highly flawed candidate.  He's the same shallow individual he always was.  Should Biden be the Democrat nominee, his appeal will be limited to mostly die-hard Democrats and Trump-haters of various stripes.  This will not be enough to unseat the president.  And given Biden's impaired mental state and the stench of corruption associated with him, the man could be turned into a blubbering mess long before Election Day.

Image: Marc Nozell via Flickr.