Win the House, investigate and expunge the impeachment

The presidential race will take center stage in the coming months, but House elections are of critical importance, too.  Looking at the numbers, the GOP needs to flip only 18 seats to regain control of the lower body.  Of the many issues Republican House candidates can successfully campaign on, the impeachment farce is one of them.

There are three ways to use impeachment against the Democrats.  The first and most obvious is the actual vote by incumbent Democrats to impeach President Trump.  This is election gold in swing districts and the ones the president carried in 2016.  But there are also two ways to add oomph to this.  


YouTube screen grab (cropped).

If elected, Republicans can promise to investigate the entire impeachment process and those involved in it for any signs of misconduct.  Documents that have been heretofore kept from the public's view can then be released.  And perhaps in that pile will be evidence that contradicts Adam Schiff's pronouncements that he didn't know the identity of the "whistleblower"( Eric Ciaramella) and that neither he nor his staff ever met with him.  In some congressional districts, campaign promises can additionally be made to investigate Ciaramella himself to determine if 1) he is a legitimate whistleblower and 2) he had a hidden agenda.

The beauty of such investigations is that they would be headed up by congressional committees and not the Department of Justice, which seems, shall we say, painfully sluggish in its effort to expose the wrongdoing of Democrat operatives within government.

If such a post-impeachment investigation proved fruitful — and how could it not? — it would then segue into the next point, and it's a juicy one.  The Republican-controlled House could vote to expunge Trump's impeachment.  Current minority leader Kevin McCarthy is in line to be speaker if Republicans regain the majority in the November election, and he has said this is a definite option.  Hopefully, he means this, and it's not just hot political air.

The Democrats and their media lapdogs would scream that expunging the impeachment would be a highly partisan affair.  Yes, but so was the entire Pelosi-Schiff-Nadler impeachment process itself.  Tit for tat, Nancy.  Democrats would also say expunging the impeachment would be merely symbolic and not legal.  Maybe so, but symbolism itself is important.  It would counter the boast by Pelosi and others on the left that "impeachment is forever."

To follow the above strategy would require playing in-your-face political hardball.  It will be interesting to see if Republicans have learned from Donald J. Trump how to play that way.  Here's hope they did.

The presidential race will take center stage in the coming months, but House elections are of critical importance, too.  Looking at the numbers, the GOP needs to flip only 18 seats to regain control of the lower body.  Of the many issues Republican House candidates can successfully campaign on, the impeachment farce is one of them.

There are three ways to use impeachment against the Democrats.  The first and most obvious is the actual vote by incumbent Democrats to impeach President Trump.  This is election gold in swing districts and the ones the president carried in 2016.  But there are also two ways to add oomph to this.  


YouTube screen grab (cropped).

If elected, Republicans can promise to investigate the entire impeachment process and those involved in it for any signs of misconduct.  Documents that have been heretofore kept from the public's view can then be released.  And perhaps in that pile will be evidence that contradicts Adam Schiff's pronouncements that he didn't know the identity of the "whistleblower"( Eric Ciaramella) and that neither he nor his staff ever met with him.  In some congressional districts, campaign promises can additionally be made to investigate Ciaramella himself to determine if 1) he is a legitimate whistleblower and 2) he had a hidden agenda.

The beauty of such investigations is that they would be headed up by congressional committees and not the Department of Justice, which seems, shall we say, painfully sluggish in its effort to expose the wrongdoing of Democrat operatives within government.

If such a post-impeachment investigation proved fruitful — and how could it not? — it would then segue into the next point, and it's a juicy one.  The Republican-controlled House could vote to expunge Trump's impeachment.  Current minority leader Kevin McCarthy is in line to be speaker if Republicans regain the majority in the November election, and he has said this is a definite option.  Hopefully, he means this, and it's not just hot political air.

The Democrats and their media lapdogs would scream that expunging the impeachment would be a highly partisan affair.  Yes, but so was the entire Pelosi-Schiff-Nadler impeachment process itself.  Tit for tat, Nancy.  Democrats would also say expunging the impeachment would be merely symbolic and not legal.  Maybe so, but symbolism itself is important.  It would counter the boast by Pelosi and others on the left that "impeachment is forever."

To follow the above strategy would require playing in-your-face political hardball.  It will be interesting to see if Republicans have learned from Donald J. Trump how to play that way.  Here's hope they did.