Tuesday: Trump wins New Hampshire. Wednesday: Stocks soar

Yeah, yeah, I know, I know — Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) barely emerged first in a plurality of multiple Democrat candidates, although he received the same number of convention delegates as the second-place winner, South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg.  But Sanders isn't even a Democrat — he runs as an independent while identifying as (to use a contemporary phrase) a Democratic Socialist.  And the Democrats, desperate for every vote, allow him into their so big, no-sided, too-inclusive tent.  That's Democrats.

As Kenneth Rapoza of Forbes pointed out:

This isn't your 2016 Bernie Sanders. (snip)

But the biggest takeaway from last night as far as the Bernie Sanders campaign goes is that he lost half his voter base from the last election.

This raises the question: will some of this lost Democrat voter base be found pulling the lever for Trump in November?  It is a possibility. 

Meanwhile, despite token Republican opposition guaranteeing a Trump primary victory, which could have reduced an incentive to vote, Republican voters faithfully appeared at the voting booth, and "[t]his year, Trump got 24% more votes than he did in 2016."  Furthermore, "Trump got nearly 50,000 more votes in New Hampshire than Sanders.  That differential alone clobbers the total of votes former frontrunners Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden got last night in their totally embarrassing showings."

Oh.

And so, on Wednesday, once again

Stocks rose to all-time highs on Wednesday as investors shook off concerns over how the coronavirus would impact corporate profits and the global economy. (Click here to get the latest news on the market).

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 275.08 points higher, or 09%, at 29,551.42. The S&P 500 advanced 0.6% to 3,379.45 while the Nasdaq Composite gained 0.8% to end the day at 9,725.96.

Yeah, yeah, I know, I know again: correlation is not causation; Tuesday's voting results did not necessarily cause Wednesday's closing record markets.  After all, record closes have been occurring regularly since Trump's election.  But lefty radical Sanders's relatively weak New Hampshire returns plus lying radical Elizabeth Warren's wipeout in a friendly neighboring state for her, along with a solid Trump victory, does lead to the hope that in the November presidential elections, something similar will occur: that voters will not "feel the Bern," but will want four more years of low unemployment, low inflation, and high contentment for even more MAGA!

Image credit: PXHere, public domain.

Yeah, yeah, I know, I know — Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) barely emerged first in a plurality of multiple Democrat candidates, although he received the same number of convention delegates as the second-place winner, South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg.  But Sanders isn't even a Democrat — he runs as an independent while identifying as (to use a contemporary phrase) a Democratic Socialist.  And the Democrats, desperate for every vote, allow him into their so big, no-sided, too-inclusive tent.  That's Democrats.

As Kenneth Rapoza of Forbes pointed out:

This isn't your 2016 Bernie Sanders. (snip)

But the biggest takeaway from last night as far as the Bernie Sanders campaign goes is that he lost half his voter base from the last election.

This raises the question: will some of this lost Democrat voter base be found pulling the lever for Trump in November?  It is a possibility. 

Meanwhile, despite token Republican opposition guaranteeing a Trump primary victory, which could have reduced an incentive to vote, Republican voters faithfully appeared at the voting booth, and "[t]his year, Trump got 24% more votes than he did in 2016."  Furthermore, "Trump got nearly 50,000 more votes in New Hampshire than Sanders.  That differential alone clobbers the total of votes former frontrunners Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden got last night in their totally embarrassing showings."

Oh.

And so, on Wednesday, once again

Stocks rose to all-time highs on Wednesday as investors shook off concerns over how the coronavirus would impact corporate profits and the global economy. (Click here to get the latest news on the market).

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 275.08 points higher, or 09%, at 29,551.42. The S&P 500 advanced 0.6% to 3,379.45 while the Nasdaq Composite gained 0.8% to end the day at 9,725.96.

Yeah, yeah, I know, I know again: correlation is not causation; Tuesday's voting results did not necessarily cause Wednesday's closing record markets.  After all, record closes have been occurring regularly since Trump's election.  But lefty radical Sanders's relatively weak New Hampshire returns plus lying radical Elizabeth Warren's wipeout in a friendly neighboring state for her, along with a solid Trump victory, does lead to the hope that in the November presidential elections, something similar will occur: that voters will not "feel the Bern," but will want four more years of low unemployment, low inflation, and high contentment for even more MAGA!

Image credit: PXHere, public domain.