The Super Bowl LIV Halftime show was polished, highly produced — and vulgar

This year, Super Bowl LIV took place in Miami.  It was, therefore, appropriate for the halftime show to have a Latin beat, with Shakira and J-Lo as the headliners.  Still, some people asked, "Did the show have to be so vulgar?"

On the pro side, Shakira and J-Lo are both superb entertainers, the songs they used were fun and energetic, the Latin beat rocked, and the backup performers were excellent.  All in all, the show was a polished 14 minutes of top-flight Latin-infused pop music and dancing.

Any people who attended a stadium show just to see these two performers, both of whom sing and dance extremely well, would have felt they got their money's worth.  Bravo!

But on the con side, the show was vulgar, and that's not just because, in keeping with all Latin dancing going back to the early 20th century, there was a lot of hip-shaking.  Few people are going to get bent out of shape by that traditional Latin American dance dynamic.

While shaking hips are now old hat, there were still a lot of vulgar moves and costumes in the halftime show:

  • Shakira implied bondage by wrapping a rope around herself.
  • Bevies of athletic young women thrusting their pelvises at the TV cameras.
  • Shakira writhed on the floor as a rapper bent over her body.
  • Shakira ululated while flicking her tongue at the camera.
  • J-Lo and her back-up dancers wore leather bondage outfits reminiscent of the leather gear fetish gay men wore in San Francisco's Folsom District in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • J-Lo wagging her half-naked butt at the camera.
  • J-Lo and her male backup dancers kept grabbing their own crotches.
  • J-Lo did some pole-dancing in a minimalist costume that barely covered her lady parts, while presiding over what is meant to look like an orgy, with people in white bondage wear writhing below her (plus more crotch-grabbing).
  • J-Lo freak-dancing, which happens when a woman backs her butt up to a man's crotch and they rub against each other as they dance.

With all of this sexually explicit dancing, it was bizarre to have the show end with a chorus of sweet-faced girls (including J-Lo's own daughter) doing the usual women's empowerment shtick.  For old-fashioned feminists, sexually objectifying oneself has little to do with empowerment.

At show's end, conservative viewers were not impressed.  Matt Walsh voiced his objection to the show's vulgarity, and a lot of people agreed:

 

 

 

 

Some, of course, had to make it all about raaaacism:

Here's the video — so if you have kids nearby, you've been warned:

And if you're yearning for more proof that the halftime shows are no longer family-friendly, contrast what you just saw with these shows from 1985 and 2000:

This year, Super Bowl LIV took place in Miami.  It was, therefore, appropriate for the halftime show to have a Latin beat, with Shakira and J-Lo as the headliners.  Still, some people asked, "Did the show have to be so vulgar?"

On the pro side, Shakira and J-Lo are both superb entertainers, the songs they used were fun and energetic, the Latin beat rocked, and the backup performers were excellent.  All in all, the show was a polished 14 minutes of top-flight Latin-infused pop music and dancing.

Any people who attended a stadium show just to see these two performers, both of whom sing and dance extremely well, would have felt they got their money's worth.  Bravo!

But on the con side, the show was vulgar, and that's not just because, in keeping with all Latin dancing going back to the early 20th century, there was a lot of hip-shaking.  Few people are going to get bent out of shape by that traditional Latin American dance dynamic.

While shaking hips are now old hat, there were still a lot of vulgar moves and costumes in the halftime show:

  • Shakira implied bondage by wrapping a rope around herself.
  • Bevies of athletic young women thrusting their pelvises at the TV cameras.
  • Shakira writhed on the floor as a rapper bent over her body.
  • Shakira ululated while flicking her tongue at the camera.
  • J-Lo and her back-up dancers wore leather bondage outfits reminiscent of the leather gear fetish gay men wore in San Francisco's Folsom District in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • J-Lo wagging her half-naked butt at the camera.
  • J-Lo and her male backup dancers kept grabbing their own crotches.
  • J-Lo did some pole-dancing in a minimalist costume that barely covered her lady parts, while presiding over what is meant to look like an orgy, with people in white bondage wear writhing below her (plus more crotch-grabbing).
  • J-Lo freak-dancing, which happens when a woman backs her butt up to a man's crotch and they rub against each other as they dance.

With all of this sexually explicit dancing, it was bizarre to have the show end with a chorus of sweet-faced girls (including J-Lo's own daughter) doing the usual women's empowerment shtick.  For old-fashioned feminists, sexually objectifying oneself has little to do with empowerment.

At show's end, conservative viewers were not impressed.  Matt Walsh voiced his objection to the show's vulgarity, and a lot of people agreed:

 

 

 

 

Some, of course, had to make it all about raaaacism:

Here's the video — so if you have kids nearby, you've been warned:

And if you're yearning for more proof that the halftime shows are no longer family-friendly, contrast what you just saw with these shows from 1985 and 2000: