The Department of Justice has announced that it will not prosecute Andrew McCabe

Andrew McCabe was once the deputy director of the FBI.  Former U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions fired him, however, when Inspector General Michael Horowitz concluded that McCabe had not only improperly leaked intel to the Wall Street Journal about the Hillary email probe, but had also lied to the FBI about his decision.  McCabe, who was smart enough to be second in command at one of the U.S.'s most powerful government agencies, later explained that he was confused.

Despite Horowitz's findings and McCabe's weak excuse, the Department of Justice opted to drop all charges against McCabe.  Coincidentally or not, one of the prosecutors who signed off on that decision is the same prosecutor who cut a deal with Imran Awan, a former I.T. aide to Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who may well have been spying on Congress.

The statement that J.P. Cooney and Molly Gaston, both of the DOJ, wrote to McCabe's attorneys was brief:

We write to inform you that, after careful consideration, the Government has decided not to pursue criminal charges against your client, Andrew G. McCabe, arising from the referral by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) to our Office of conduct described in OIG's April 13, 2018, report entitled, "A Report of Investigation of Certain Allegations Relating to Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe." Based on the totality of the circumstances, and all of the information known to the Government at this time, we consider the matter closed.

Democrats were predictably delighted by the decision.  McCabe, copying Comey, was appropriately sanctimonious.  Lisa Page, who, with Peter Strzok, ranted about Trump and Trump-supporters, and dreamed of ways to end Trump's presidency, toasted McCabe's victory:

Conservatives, contrasting the DOJ’s treatment of McCabe, Comey, and Hillary with its treatment of Flynn, Stone, Papadopoulos, etc., were deeply upset:

Aside from the sense, expressed above, that the Deep State will always protect Democrats, other theories floated up to explain what happened.  George Papadopoulos, himself a target of the Mueller gang, suspects that deeper doings are afoot and urges patience:

Some think the fault lies with Donald Trump and his tweets because they supposedly made it impossible for prosecutors to try the case.  Speaking as a lawyer, that's bollocks.  If a case exists, the tweets are irrelevant.

However, what gives that idea credence is the revelation that federal judge Reggie Walton stated some months ago that he was troubled by the White House:

I understand there are political implications and other implications involved in reference to whether you go forward. And I fully appreciate the complexity of the assessment, especially — unfortunately, to be candid — in light of the way by the White House, which I don't think top executive officers should be doing. Because it does, I think, really complicate your ability to get a fair adjudication from the government's prospective.

Because the public is listening to what's going on, and I don't think people like the fact that you got somebody at the top basically trying to dictate whether somebody should be prosecuted," Walton said. "I just think it's a banana republic when we go down that road, and we have those type of statements being made that are conceivably, even if not, influencing the ultimate decision. I think there are a lot of people on the outside who perceive that there is undue inappropriate pressure being brought to bear.

NeverTrumpers are excited by the fact that Walton is not an Obama appointee.  They shouldn't be.  First, he's a George W. Bush appointee, and the Bush coterie hates Trump so much that its members will support Democrats.  Second, Walton was head of the FISA court from 2013 to 2014, a court that has distinguished itself by being either corrupt, stupid, careless, or credulous (or maybe all of the above).  He's defending his turf.

Another theory is that McCabe entered into a deal with the DOJ to name names and give facts and that this refusal to prosecute is his reward.  John Cardillo, however, thinks this is unlikely:

Finally, there's the practical reality that McCabe's case would have been tried in Washington, D.C. While President Trump, with Mitch McConnell's support, is finally clamping down on rogue, activist judges, the reality is that D.C. is an almost impossible venue for Democrats. Hillary won that district in 2016 with 90.9% of all votes. The DOJ may simply have made a pragmatic decision not to engage in a pointless exercise.

And then there are those of us hoping that letting McCabe go is the predicate for the DOJ asking that all charges against Flynn and others caught in Mueller's truly evil procedural traps be expunged...

Andrew McCabe was once the deputy director of the FBI.  Former U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions fired him, however, when Inspector General Michael Horowitz concluded that McCabe had not only improperly leaked intel to the Wall Street Journal about the Hillary email probe, but had also lied to the FBI about his decision.  McCabe, who was smart enough to be second in command at one of the U.S.'s most powerful government agencies, later explained that he was confused.

Despite Horowitz's findings and McCabe's weak excuse, the Department of Justice opted to drop all charges against McCabe.  Coincidentally or not, one of the prosecutors who signed off on that decision is the same prosecutor who cut a deal with Imran Awan, a former I.T. aide to Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who may well have been spying on Congress.

The statement that J.P. Cooney and Molly Gaston, both of the DOJ, wrote to McCabe's attorneys was brief:

We write to inform you that, after careful consideration, the Government has decided not to pursue criminal charges against your client, Andrew G. McCabe, arising from the referral by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) to our Office of conduct described in OIG's April 13, 2018, report entitled, "A Report of Investigation of Certain Allegations Relating to Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe." Based on the totality of the circumstances, and all of the information known to the Government at this time, we consider the matter closed.

Democrats were predictably delighted by the decision.  McCabe, copying Comey, was appropriately sanctimonious.  Lisa Page, who, with Peter Strzok, ranted about Trump and Trump-supporters, and dreamed of ways to end Trump's presidency, toasted McCabe's victory:

Conservatives, contrasting the DOJ’s treatment of McCabe, Comey, and Hillary with its treatment of Flynn, Stone, Papadopoulos, etc., were deeply upset:

Aside from the sense, expressed above, that the Deep State will always protect Democrats, other theories floated up to explain what happened.  George Papadopoulos, himself a target of the Mueller gang, suspects that deeper doings are afoot and urges patience:

Some think the fault lies with Donald Trump and his tweets because they supposedly made it impossible for prosecutors to try the case.  Speaking as a lawyer, that's bollocks.  If a case exists, the tweets are irrelevant.

However, what gives that idea credence is the revelation that federal judge Reggie Walton stated some months ago that he was troubled by the White House:

I understand there are political implications and other implications involved in reference to whether you go forward. And I fully appreciate the complexity of the assessment, especially — unfortunately, to be candid — in light of the way by the White House, which I don't think top executive officers should be doing. Because it does, I think, really complicate your ability to get a fair adjudication from the government's prospective.

Because the public is listening to what's going on, and I don't think people like the fact that you got somebody at the top basically trying to dictate whether somebody should be prosecuted," Walton said. "I just think it's a banana republic when we go down that road, and we have those type of statements being made that are conceivably, even if not, influencing the ultimate decision. I think there are a lot of people on the outside who perceive that there is undue inappropriate pressure being brought to bear.

NeverTrumpers are excited by the fact that Walton is not an Obama appointee.  They shouldn't be.  First, he's a George W. Bush appointee, and the Bush coterie hates Trump so much that its members will support Democrats.  Second, Walton was head of the FISA court from 2013 to 2014, a court that has distinguished itself by being either corrupt, stupid, careless, or credulous (or maybe all of the above).  He's defending his turf.

Another theory is that McCabe entered into a deal with the DOJ to name names and give facts and that this refusal to prosecute is his reward.  John Cardillo, however, thinks this is unlikely:

Finally, there's the practical reality that McCabe's case would have been tried in Washington, D.C. While President Trump, with Mitch McConnell's support, is finally clamping down on rogue, activist judges, the reality is that D.C. is an almost impossible venue for Democrats. Hillary won that district in 2016 with 90.9% of all votes. The DOJ may simply have made a pragmatic decision not to engage in a pointless exercise.

And then there are those of us hoping that letting McCabe go is the predicate for the DOJ asking that all charges against Flynn and others caught in Mueller's truly evil procedural traps be expunged...