The case for Sanders

Watching Joe Biden pander to "Blacks and Browns" in South Carolina while refusing to stick around to thank his supporters in New Hampshire suggests one descriptor: cringe-worthy.

Like wrecks at NASCAR events causing spectators to put their collective hands to their mouths in dismay, such is the case when such a high-profile person crashes.  Yet, even in his smoldering wreckage, Biden sinks to lower levels of importance as America's gaze returns to the leaders in this race to the White House.

Most watching would agree that the DNC is currently struggling with party identity.  Exhibit A is the fact that two of the biggest names in the race are not Democrats.  Bernie Sanders refuses to bear the party name as a senator but seeks it as a president.  Mayor Bloomberg switched to Republican to run for mayor of New York and then switched back to Democrat.  One of the identities Elizabeth Warren used was "Republican."  Those facts can't be helpful to the party finding its collective voice, and the debate in Nevada did little to dispel the "Carvillian" dismay over a party in shambles.

Yet one issue could prove different: authenticity.

While Amy Klobuchar and Tulsi Gabbard bring a measure of authenticity to their respective messages, none can match Sanders.  Unlike most politicians (including President Trump), Bernie's message remains surprisingly consistent for his lengthy years in the public eye.  Yet Bernie brings more than just consistency.

While others like Joe Biden pander, Bernie proselytizes.  As his competition uses rehearsed talking points, Bernie speaks out of conviction.  It would be fascinating to compare the "debate prep" time among the candidates.  Bernie doesn't seem to be the type to cram before a test.  Rather, he seems to always be on message.

One doesn't have to agree with Bernie Sanders to admire what he's accomplished.  He hasn't built constituencies; he's launched a movement.

Had he stood up to Hillary Clinton with as much passion as he does to Donald Trump, our history books may be different now.  If he can effectively convince Americans that he will fight harder for them than he did for his own campaign in 2016, history may indeed change.

It remains to be seen whether the DNC accepts someone who rejected its label as a senator, or if Bernie chooses to hyphenate his party affiliation.  One thing stands clear: Sanders is authentic — and no one can argue about what he believes.

If the ticket for November is a capitalist versus a socialist, America will benefit from such a match-up.  It's past time for our country to decide our collective direction.  Some may argue that incrementalism has a place, but Americans are weary of the struggle and seem eager to pick a direction and start moving, one way or the other.

There's a strong case for Bernie Sanders to be the nominee.  Bernie doesn't mince words.  While that frightens some, one knows where he stands. 

Of all the candidates vying for the nomination, he presents the most articulate and passionate message of the left's goals.  Put his ideas on the table, and let people vote.  If his ideas are as great as he and his passionate followers state, why phase them in lukewarmly?

As the DNC struggles with appearing to put its thumb on the scale as it did in 2016, one hopes it will let Bernie be Bernie — and let the chips fall where they may.

Americans deserves authenticity, and few (if any) are more real than Bernie Sanders.

Peter Rosenberger is a 30-plus-year caregiver for his wife (Gracie), who lives with severe disabilities. He is the host of Hope for the Caregiver, heard weekly on Sirius XM (131) and 180 additional stations.

Watching Joe Biden pander to "Blacks and Browns" in South Carolina while refusing to stick around to thank his supporters in New Hampshire suggests one descriptor: cringe-worthy.

Like wrecks at NASCAR events causing spectators to put their collective hands to their mouths in dismay, such is the case when such a high-profile person crashes.  Yet, even in his smoldering wreckage, Biden sinks to lower levels of importance as America's gaze returns to the leaders in this race to the White House.

Most watching would agree that the DNC is currently struggling with party identity.  Exhibit A is the fact that two of the biggest names in the race are not Democrats.  Bernie Sanders refuses to bear the party name as a senator but seeks it as a president.  Mayor Bloomberg switched to Republican to run for mayor of New York and then switched back to Democrat.  One of the identities Elizabeth Warren used was "Republican."  Those facts can't be helpful to the party finding its collective voice, and the debate in Nevada did little to dispel the "Carvillian" dismay over a party in shambles.

Yet one issue could prove different: authenticity.

While Amy Klobuchar and Tulsi Gabbard bring a measure of authenticity to their respective messages, none can match Sanders.  Unlike most politicians (including President Trump), Bernie's message remains surprisingly consistent for his lengthy years in the public eye.  Yet Bernie brings more than just consistency.

While others like Joe Biden pander, Bernie proselytizes.  As his competition uses rehearsed talking points, Bernie speaks out of conviction.  It would be fascinating to compare the "debate prep" time among the candidates.  Bernie doesn't seem to be the type to cram before a test.  Rather, he seems to always be on message.

One doesn't have to agree with Bernie Sanders to admire what he's accomplished.  He hasn't built constituencies; he's launched a movement.

Had he stood up to Hillary Clinton with as much passion as he does to Donald Trump, our history books may be different now.  If he can effectively convince Americans that he will fight harder for them than he did for his own campaign in 2016, history may indeed change.

It remains to be seen whether the DNC accepts someone who rejected its label as a senator, or if Bernie chooses to hyphenate his party affiliation.  One thing stands clear: Sanders is authentic — and no one can argue about what he believes.

If the ticket for November is a capitalist versus a socialist, America will benefit from such a match-up.  It's past time for our country to decide our collective direction.  Some may argue that incrementalism has a place, but Americans are weary of the struggle and seem eager to pick a direction and start moving, one way or the other.

There's a strong case for Bernie Sanders to be the nominee.  Bernie doesn't mince words.  While that frightens some, one knows where he stands. 

Of all the candidates vying for the nomination, he presents the most articulate and passionate message of the left's goals.  Put his ideas on the table, and let people vote.  If his ideas are as great as he and his passionate followers state, why phase them in lukewarmly?

As the DNC struggles with appearing to put its thumb on the scale as it did in 2016, one hopes it will let Bernie be Bernie — and let the chips fall where they may.

Americans deserves authenticity, and few (if any) are more real than Bernie Sanders.

Peter Rosenberger is a 30-plus-year caregiver for his wife (Gracie), who lives with severe disabilities. He is the host of Hope for the Caregiver, heard weekly on Sirius XM (131) and 180 additional stations.