Breakey's best yet: Fearless Men, but Few

Breakey does it again!

In another fine work of reality-based fiction, K.M. Breakey offers a modern-day tale of Ireland.  The story is absent the usual Irish suspects — the fairies, banshees, and leprechauns — but it does not lack in scary realism.  Throughout Ireland's history, it has always been realism that seems to be that nation's most frequent visitor.

As Ireland goes, so does Western civilization.  If this is true, then the events and attitudes portrayed in Breakey's novel, and those presently existing in the Home of Saints and Scholars today, tell us that society as we know it may be circling the drain.

Most have not paid attention.  While Europe is asleep at the wheel, the globalists are putting the full court press on Ireland.  They are moving in the Africans and Arabs, with the goal of replacing white Christians, Catholic and Protestant, with Muslims.  The idea is so preposterous, so bizarre in its audacity, that the reader's astonishment is understandable.  And the question, ripped from Breakey's pages: "Would enough Irish wake to the nonsense while there is still time?"

The sides shape up like this: sleazy politicians, greedy landlords, human-traffickers, NGOs, E.U. bureaucrats, and the liberal media pandering to liberal snowflakes and academics.

On the other side are patriots, nationalists, and common Irish folk who believe that Ireland belongs to the Irish.  These are the descendants of ancestors who have been expelling foreign invaders for at least six hundred years.  Stubborn tenacity may be their most useful and common weapon.

The story builds toward the predictable confrontation between the patriot-protagonist, an Irish footballer turned Alt-Right broadcaster and politician, and a Somali immigrant imported into Ireland for the purpose of weakening resolve and eliminating any nativist resistance.  A donnybrook ensues.  (No spoiler — we're talking Ireland.)

The shocking backdrop to this story is that present-day Ireland is actually under this immigration assault.  The Irish are having their homeland taken from them, and they are being forced to pay for it.  It's as if the Irish are backward, lowbrow racists for wanting a country of their own.  If this were true, the Japanese are just as guilty for living in a place that is virtually 100% Japanese.

After all, what is a nation, really?  James Joyce defined it thus: "A nation is the same people living in the same place."  With that in mind, the globalists' goals come into view clearly: a new world order, where there is no such entity as a nation.  One world, one flag, one anthem, one currency, one religion, one school of thought.

Breakey fights the fight the way his protagonist, Eamon Clarke, does — using his God-given talent.  In Clarke's case, it is his athleticism, his courage, and his public speaking skills.  With K.M. Breakey, it's his command of the English language and his wordsmithing skills, honed over the years while producing many novels, four of which I have enjoyed.

Fearless Men, but Few is K.M. Breakey's  best yet.

Willie Shields is a radio host, a paralegal, and author of Exit 13A – A Control Tower Diary.  A "once and always" U.S. Marine and a former air traffic controller, Mr. Shields resides in Wilmington, Delaware.  He responds to email: WSHIELDS1775@VERIZON.NET, Twitter @WILLIEONRADIO.

Breakey does it again!

In another fine work of reality-based fiction, K.M. Breakey offers a modern-day tale of Ireland.  The story is absent the usual Irish suspects — the fairies, banshees, and leprechauns — but it does not lack in scary realism.  Throughout Ireland's history, it has always been realism that seems to be that nation's most frequent visitor.

As Ireland goes, so does Western civilization.  If this is true, then the events and attitudes portrayed in Breakey's novel, and those presently existing in the Home of Saints and Scholars today, tell us that society as we know it may be circling the drain.

Most have not paid attention.  While Europe is asleep at the wheel, the globalists are putting the full court press on Ireland.  They are moving in the Africans and Arabs, with the goal of replacing white Christians, Catholic and Protestant, with Muslims.  The idea is so preposterous, so bizarre in its audacity, that the reader's astonishment is understandable.  And the question, ripped from Breakey's pages: "Would enough Irish wake to the nonsense while there is still time?"

The sides shape up like this: sleazy politicians, greedy landlords, human-traffickers, NGOs, E.U. bureaucrats, and the liberal media pandering to liberal snowflakes and academics.

On the other side are patriots, nationalists, and common Irish folk who believe that Ireland belongs to the Irish.  These are the descendants of ancestors who have been expelling foreign invaders for at least six hundred years.  Stubborn tenacity may be their most useful and common weapon.

The story builds toward the predictable confrontation between the patriot-protagonist, an Irish footballer turned Alt-Right broadcaster and politician, and a Somali immigrant imported into Ireland for the purpose of weakening resolve and eliminating any nativist resistance.  A donnybrook ensues.  (No spoiler — we're talking Ireland.)

The shocking backdrop to this story is that present-day Ireland is actually under this immigration assault.  The Irish are having their homeland taken from them, and they are being forced to pay for it.  It's as if the Irish are backward, lowbrow racists for wanting a country of their own.  If this were true, the Japanese are just as guilty for living in a place that is virtually 100% Japanese.

After all, what is a nation, really?  James Joyce defined it thus: "A nation is the same people living in the same place."  With that in mind, the globalists' goals come into view clearly: a new world order, where there is no such entity as a nation.  One world, one flag, one anthem, one currency, one religion, one school of thought.

Breakey fights the fight the way his protagonist, Eamon Clarke, does — using his God-given talent.  In Clarke's case, it is his athleticism, his courage, and his public speaking skills.  With K.M. Breakey, it's his command of the English language and his wordsmithing skills, honed over the years while producing many novels, four of which I have enjoyed.

Fearless Men, but Few is K.M. Breakey's  best yet.

Willie Shields is a radio host, a paralegal, and author of Exit 13A – A Control Tower Diary.  A "once and always" U.S. Marine and a former air traffic controller, Mr. Shields resides in Wilmington, Delaware.  He responds to email: WSHIELDS1775@VERIZON.NET, Twitter @WILLIEONRADIO.