Bloomberg gives death panels a try

Mike Bloomberg says health care will bankrupt us unless we deny it to the elderly.  He means the elderly who aren't rich.

He's talking about a National Health Service.  That's been tried — is still being tried — in Canada and England and Australia.  All are notorious for patients dying from neglect, or while waiting to use life-saving treatment readily available in America without waiting, such as dialysis.  It's well known that Canadians near the border often come down to America for such treatment.  They would die waiting in line at home.

That's what nationalized health care does, and it's what Mike has in mind for us.

Twelve years ago, Sarah Palin warned us about death panels deciding who got to live or die while waiting for treatment.  Liberals raised a hue and cry about her terminology, but that's what Mike Bloomberg's talking about — only Mike would make the decision ahead of time by drawing a line under all those 95 and older.  Until it became necessary to draw it under those 85 and older.  Then 75.  There would be no lower limit, so this could go on until — what age?

But it really wouldn't be about age.  It would be about who can bribe his way to the front of the line, or who is related to whom.  We already know that's where the scam ends up once begun.

We were better off before Hillary Clinton began yammering about a "health care crisis" nearly 30 years ago.  There was no such crisis then, and there is none now, but there certainly will be if we go where Mike Bloomberg wants to take us.

If Mike seriously wants to help, he could donate some of his billions toward the purchase and maintenance of the expensive machines that help save lives — X-ray, CAT scans, dialysis, etc. — for hospitals and health clinics and consortia that can't afford them.  He could help new doctors coming into the marketplace set up practices with low-interest loans and low-rate malpractice insurance.  These would make a direct difference in medical costs and save lives without some bureaucrat picking and choosing who lives and who dies.

Get busy, Mike.  Ideas like these would actually help people.  What you're thinking right now would not.

Mike Bloomberg says health care will bankrupt us unless we deny it to the elderly.  He means the elderly who aren't rich.

He's talking about a National Health Service.  That's been tried — is still being tried — in Canada and England and Australia.  All are notorious for patients dying from neglect, or while waiting to use life-saving treatment readily available in America without waiting, such as dialysis.  It's well known that Canadians near the border often come down to America for such treatment.  They would die waiting in line at home.

That's what nationalized health care does, and it's what Mike has in mind for us.

Twelve years ago, Sarah Palin warned us about death panels deciding who got to live or die while waiting for treatment.  Liberals raised a hue and cry about her terminology, but that's what Mike Bloomberg's talking about — only Mike would make the decision ahead of time by drawing a line under all those 95 and older.  Until it became necessary to draw it under those 85 and older.  Then 75.  There would be no lower limit, so this could go on until — what age?

But it really wouldn't be about age.  It would be about who can bribe his way to the front of the line, or who is related to whom.  We already know that's where the scam ends up once begun.

We were better off before Hillary Clinton began yammering about a "health care crisis" nearly 30 years ago.  There was no such crisis then, and there is none now, but there certainly will be if we go where Mike Bloomberg wants to take us.

If Mike seriously wants to help, he could donate some of his billions toward the purchase and maintenance of the expensive machines that help save lives — X-ray, CAT scans, dialysis, etc. — for hospitals and health clinics and consortia that can't afford them.  He could help new doctors coming into the marketplace set up practices with low-interest loans and low-rate malpractice insurance.  These would make a direct difference in medical costs and save lives without some bureaucrat picking and choosing who lives and who dies.

Get busy, Mike.  Ideas like these would actually help people.  What you're thinking right now would not.