With rising anti-Semitism, New Yorkers rally to hate Trump while hating 'hate'

Thanks to conservative Jewish friends in New York, I knew that there was going to be a rally on Sunday to speak out against the rising number of anti-Semitic attacks in the New York City region, both in New York State and in New Jersey.  I also knew they were concerned that the rally, rather than bringing black and Jewish communities together, would end up as a leftist fest.  They were correct.

We've already written here about a malignant mindset affecting a small but growing subset of urban blacks, which manifests itself in violent, or demeaning, anti-Semitic attacks.  The problem, happily, is not black culture at large.  It's limited to the effect that (a) Islam and (b) Progressivism are having on New York–area urban black culture.

Progressives, from Mayor de Blasio on down, ignore the evidence about the perpetrators of these anti-Semitic attacks and instead choose (1) to blame Trump, although none of the perpetrators in the New York region have appeared to be Trump-supporters, and (2) to blame Jews, just for being, which is apparently more than enough to cause offense.

So it was that, according to non-progressive Jewish attendees, the rally against anti-Semitism quickly became an intersectionality gathering, complete with Trump Derangement Syndrome and Israel-bashing, along with promises to fight some sort of generic "hate."  It was, in its way, reminiscent of when the House was going to censure Ilhan Omar's open anti-Semitism but eventually resolved that House members were against all types of -isms, including but not limited to anti-Semitism.

I don't have to take my friends' words for it.  Many attendees posted pictures on Twitter.  One gal, Simone Zimmerman, was good enough to take a lot of photos.  Because she's a leftist herself, she was completely on board with the "blame it on Trump" attitude — never mind that there has never been an American president with warmer feelings toward Jews (including his beloved daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren) or toward Israel:

Even Zimmerman, however, figured out that anti-Zionism is inconsistent with taking a strong stand against active anti-Semitism.  David Bernstein's comment when he saw Zimmerman's photo pretty much sums it up:

A Bernie Sanders worker was proudly there, too.  This would be the same Bernie Sanders who travels with Linda Sarsour, an open anti-Semite who has cleverly disguised this fact, at least as far as leftists are concerned, simply by denying the obvious:

There had to be a little bit of love for the illegal alien crowd thrown in:

Ultimately, the note sounded was generic.  Everybody was against "hate":

The New York Times was pleased with the rally.  The one thing it never mentioned was the peculiarly consistent political and religious ideology tying the perpetrators together.  Instead, it just noted that politicians promised more money to combat "hate":

Speaking to the crowd on Sunday, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said that New York will increase funding for security at religious institutions and will also increase the presence of the state police force and hate crimes task force in vulnerable communities. Mr. Cuomo said he also plans to propose a new state law labeling hate crimes as domestic terrorism.

"While we're here today in the spirit of solidarity and love, government must do more than just offer thoughts and prayers. Government must act," Mr. Cuomo said.

At the rally, Senator Chuck Schumer of New York announced a proposal to increase federal funding to protect houses of worship and increase the capacity for local police groups to fight hate crimes.

And meanwhile, on (or under) the streets of New York, hate lives on:

Thanks to conservative Jewish friends in New York, I knew that there was going to be a rally on Sunday to speak out against the rising number of anti-Semitic attacks in the New York City region, both in New York State and in New Jersey.  I also knew they were concerned that the rally, rather than bringing black and Jewish communities together, would end up as a leftist fest.  They were correct.

We've already written here about a malignant mindset affecting a small but growing subset of urban blacks, which manifests itself in violent, or demeaning, anti-Semitic attacks.  The problem, happily, is not black culture at large.  It's limited to the effect that (a) Islam and (b) Progressivism are having on New York–area urban black culture.

Progressives, from Mayor de Blasio on down, ignore the evidence about the perpetrators of these anti-Semitic attacks and instead choose (1) to blame Trump, although none of the perpetrators in the New York region have appeared to be Trump-supporters, and (2) to blame Jews, just for being, which is apparently more than enough to cause offense.

So it was that, according to non-progressive Jewish attendees, the rally against anti-Semitism quickly became an intersectionality gathering, complete with Trump Derangement Syndrome and Israel-bashing, along with promises to fight some sort of generic "hate."  It was, in its way, reminiscent of when the House was going to censure Ilhan Omar's open anti-Semitism but eventually resolved that House members were against all types of -isms, including but not limited to anti-Semitism.

I don't have to take my friends' words for it.  Many attendees posted pictures on Twitter.  One gal, Simone Zimmerman, was good enough to take a lot of photos.  Because she's a leftist herself, she was completely on board with the "blame it on Trump" attitude — never mind that there has never been an American president with warmer feelings toward Jews (including his beloved daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren) or toward Israel:

Even Zimmerman, however, figured out that anti-Zionism is inconsistent with taking a strong stand against active anti-Semitism.  David Bernstein's comment when he saw Zimmerman's photo pretty much sums it up:

A Bernie Sanders worker was proudly there, too.  This would be the same Bernie Sanders who travels with Linda Sarsour, an open anti-Semite who has cleverly disguised this fact, at least as far as leftists are concerned, simply by denying the obvious:

There had to be a little bit of love for the illegal alien crowd thrown in:

Ultimately, the note sounded was generic.  Everybody was against "hate":

The New York Times was pleased with the rally.  The one thing it never mentioned was the peculiarly consistent political and religious ideology tying the perpetrators together.  Instead, it just noted that politicians promised more money to combat "hate":

Speaking to the crowd on Sunday, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said that New York will increase funding for security at religious institutions and will also increase the presence of the state police force and hate crimes task force in vulnerable communities. Mr. Cuomo said he also plans to propose a new state law labeling hate crimes as domestic terrorism.

"While we're here today in the spirit of solidarity and love, government must do more than just offer thoughts and prayers. Government must act," Mr. Cuomo said.

At the rally, Senator Chuck Schumer of New York announced a proposal to increase federal funding to protect houses of worship and increase the capacity for local police groups to fight hate crimes.

And meanwhile, on (or under) the streets of New York, hate lives on: