While St. Greta harangues the world, back home in Sweden poll of taxpayers identifies climate spending as the biggest government waste

Greta Thunberg, the visibly disturbed child who is being exploited by climate fraudsters, may be able to draw a crowd abroad, but back home in Sweden, taxpayers have grown weary of throwing money at "climate policy" to no effect.  The Swedish Taxpayers Association conducted a poll that received 18,000 replies, and found that spending on climate is regarded as the worst waste of tax money in 2019.  Via Google Translate, the newspaper Skattebetalarna reports:

Swedish climate policy is the worst waste of the year 2019. At least when the Swedish people are allowed to decide. Climate policy is therefore awarded the award by the Taxpayers' Waste Ombudsman.

- The government has more than doubled the appropriations for climate policy, but despite this, emissions no longer decrease. In 2018, emissions even increased. That is why climate policy has been voted the worst waste of the year, says Johan Gustafsson, Waste Ombudsman at the Taxpayers' Association.

With over 18,000 votes, it was a new record in the number of votes for the competition's worst waste of the year and 30 percent of the votes landed on climate policy. (snip)

Allocations to climate policy have more than doubled in recent years, while emissions have basically ceased to decrease. In the government's budget for 2020, 12.6 billion [krona, equivalent to $1.3 billion] is allocated for climate policy, compared with 5.2 billion in 2014. But despite this, emissions no longer decrease. Last year, emissions increased even marginally.

Sweden's per capita spending on climate would amount to $33.8 billion if the United States spent at the same rate.  Incidentally, thanks to the natural gas produced by fracking replacing coal for electrical generation, U.S. CO2 emissions are declining, unlike Sweden's.


Greta Thunberg addresses the EU Parliament for some reason in 2019.
Photo credit: David Levy (cropped).

Don't expect St. Greta to go to North Dakota or Texas to thank frackers for doing the most to reduce CO2 emissions.

Hat tip: Tim Blair, Daily Telegraph of Australia, and John McMahon.

Greta Thunberg, the visibly disturbed child who is being exploited by climate fraudsters, may be able to draw a crowd abroad, but back home in Sweden, taxpayers have grown weary of throwing money at "climate policy" to no effect.  The Swedish Taxpayers Association conducted a poll that received 18,000 replies, and found that spending on climate is regarded as the worst waste of tax money in 2019.  Via Google Translate, the newspaper Skattebetalarna reports:

Swedish climate policy is the worst waste of the year 2019. At least when the Swedish people are allowed to decide. Climate policy is therefore awarded the award by the Taxpayers' Waste Ombudsman.

- The government has more than doubled the appropriations for climate policy, but despite this, emissions no longer decrease. In 2018, emissions even increased. That is why climate policy has been voted the worst waste of the year, says Johan Gustafsson, Waste Ombudsman at the Taxpayers' Association.

With over 18,000 votes, it was a new record in the number of votes for the competition's worst waste of the year and 30 percent of the votes landed on climate policy. (snip)

Allocations to climate policy have more than doubled in recent years, while emissions have basically ceased to decrease. In the government's budget for 2020, 12.6 billion [krona, equivalent to $1.3 billion] is allocated for climate policy, compared with 5.2 billion in 2014. But despite this, emissions no longer decrease. Last year, emissions increased even marginally.

Sweden's per capita spending on climate would amount to $33.8 billion if the United States spent at the same rate.  Incidentally, thanks to the natural gas produced by fracking replacing coal for electrical generation, U.S. CO2 emissions are declining, unlike Sweden's.


Greta Thunberg addresses the EU Parliament for some reason in 2019.
Photo credit: David Levy (cropped).

Don't expect St. Greta to go to North Dakota or Texas to thank frackers for doing the most to reduce CO2 emissions.

Hat tip: Tim Blair, Daily Telegraph of Australia, and John McMahon.