Trump to meet with Netanyahu and Gantz about his proposed peace plan

Reading about President Trump's announcement that he will be unveiling his Peace Plan to both Netanyahu and Gantz and about the Palestinian response, which is to riot at the mere thought of a plan, one cannot help but think of Abba Eban's famous 1973 statement: "The Arabs never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity."

Here's what we know as of now: on Monday, Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu will meet with President Trump at the White House to discuss the grand resolution President Trump (with help from Jared Kushner) has envisioned for the Israel/Palestinian conflict.  Netanyahu is optimistic about the meeting because he trusts Trump:

"I am going to Washington to face an American president that is bringing forward a plan that I believe will advance our most vital interests," Netanyahu said.

"During the last three years I spoke countless times with Trump — who is a great friend of Israel — and his team," Netanyahu said.

President Trump also plans to meet later with Netanyahu's chief political rival, Benny Gantz of the Blue and White Party.  This is smart politics because a real plan can work only if the major political players in Israel are on board.  This is just one more sign that, unlike with past presidents who learned how to negotiate deals once they were in the White House, negotiating deals has been Trump's lifeblood for his entire career.

And here's what we don't know: the contents of the proposed peace plan.

We know that it won't concern Jerusalem's status as Israel's capital, because President Trump already confirmed that when he moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, sparking other countries to do the same.  And it won't be about the Golan Heights, because President Trump has already recognized Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights.  And it won't be about Israel settlements in the historically Jewish West Bank, because Trump has already held that the settlements are not illegal.

Nevertheless, despite a complete absence of substantive information, leftist media outlets such as Reuters are declaring the plan a bad idea:

As U.S. President Donald Trump prepares to host Israeli leaders in Washington to reveal details of his long-delayed Middle East peace plan, Palestinians warned on Friday that no deal could work without them on board.

The Palestinians, of course, have already decided they don't need no stinkin' plan:

Palestinian factions on Sunday called for a "day of rage" for the day US President Donald Trump releases his long-awaited plan for Mideast peace.

Parts of the plan are expected to be publicized during separate meetings in Washington this week between Trump, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Blue and White chairman Benny Gantz.

Palestinians often mark "days of rage" by initiating clashes with IDF soldiers in the West Bank and Israeli policemen in east Jerusalem.

As the Hamas charter reveals, it's never been about peace.  It's always been about expelling Jews from the region, by blood, brute force, or international politics.

What the Palestinians fail to realize is that they are already on board with the peace plan, whether they like it or not.  First, Israeli has been forging peace plans all over the region with other Arab nations worried about Iran.  On Sunday, Israel announced for the first time that Israeli citizens may visit Saudi Arabia for business or, if they're Muslim citizens, for religious reasons.  It's long had decent relations with Egypt and is now selling Egypt its bounty of natural gas.  And in 2018, Netanyahu made a historic visit to Oman.

Second, Trump's decisions about the U.S. embassy, the Golan Heights, and the settlements have taken those issues off the table.  Under Trump's aegis, the trend for the Palestinians over the last three years is to have fewer and fewer cards to play.  This indicates that one of Trump's chief negotiating tools will be to say to the Palestinians, "Play nicely or we'll take even more of your toys away."  That's the stick.  The carrot is something Kushner hinted at in Bahrain last year when he spoke about plans to turn Gaza and the West Bank into sparkling diamonds of commerce, luxury, and sight-seeing on the beautiful Mediterranean coast.

Just as Afghanistan proved to be the graveyard of empires, the intractable problem of Palestinian hatred toward Israel has been the graveyard of peace plans.  However, Trump's out-of-the-box thinking, his clamping down on past Palestinian demands, and his skills as a negotiator, combined with Israel repositioning itself as a major natural gas exporter and a partner with a variety of Arab countries worried about Iran, may finally shut that graveyard down and bring about a workable peace plan.

Correction made substituting Trump for Obama

Reading about President Trump's announcement that he will be unveiling his Peace Plan to both Netanyahu and Gantz and about the Palestinian response, which is to riot at the mere thought of a plan, one cannot help but think of Abba Eban's famous 1973 statement: "The Arabs never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity."

Here's what we know as of now: on Monday, Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu will meet with President Trump at the White House to discuss the grand resolution President Trump (with help from Jared Kushner) has envisioned for the Israel/Palestinian conflict.  Netanyahu is optimistic about the meeting because he trusts Trump:

"I am going to Washington to face an American president that is bringing forward a plan that I believe will advance our most vital interests," Netanyahu said.

"During the last three years I spoke countless times with Trump — who is a great friend of Israel — and his team," Netanyahu said.

President Trump also plans to meet later with Netanyahu's chief political rival, Benny Gantz of the Blue and White Party.  This is smart politics because a real plan can work only if the major political players in Israel are on board.  This is just one more sign that, unlike with past presidents who learned how to negotiate deals once they were in the White House, negotiating deals has been Trump's lifeblood for his entire career.

And here's what we don't know: the contents of the proposed peace plan.

We know that it won't concern Jerusalem's status as Israel's capital, because President Trump already confirmed that when he moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, sparking other countries to do the same.  And it won't be about the Golan Heights, because President Trump has already recognized Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights.  And it won't be about Israel settlements in the historically Jewish West Bank, because Trump has already held that the settlements are not illegal.

Nevertheless, despite a complete absence of substantive information, leftist media outlets such as Reuters are declaring the plan a bad idea:

As U.S. President Donald Trump prepares to host Israeli leaders in Washington to reveal details of his long-delayed Middle East peace plan, Palestinians warned on Friday that no deal could work without them on board.

The Palestinians, of course, have already decided they don't need no stinkin' plan:

Palestinian factions on Sunday called for a "day of rage" for the day US President Donald Trump releases his long-awaited plan for Mideast peace.

Parts of the plan are expected to be publicized during separate meetings in Washington this week between Trump, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Blue and White chairman Benny Gantz.

Palestinians often mark "days of rage" by initiating clashes with IDF soldiers in the West Bank and Israeli policemen in east Jerusalem.

As the Hamas charter reveals, it's never been about peace.  It's always been about expelling Jews from the region, by blood, brute force, or international politics.

What the Palestinians fail to realize is that they are already on board with the peace plan, whether they like it or not.  First, Israeli has been forging peace plans all over the region with other Arab nations worried about Iran.  On Sunday, Israel announced for the first time that Israeli citizens may visit Saudi Arabia for business or, if they're Muslim citizens, for religious reasons.  It's long had decent relations with Egypt and is now selling Egypt its bounty of natural gas.  And in 2018, Netanyahu made a historic visit to Oman.

Second, Trump's decisions about the U.S. embassy, the Golan Heights, and the settlements have taken those issues off the table.  Under Trump's aegis, the trend for the Palestinians over the last three years is to have fewer and fewer cards to play.  This indicates that one of Trump's chief negotiating tools will be to say to the Palestinians, "Play nicely or we'll take even more of your toys away."  That's the stick.  The carrot is something Kushner hinted at in Bahrain last year when he spoke about plans to turn Gaza and the West Bank into sparkling diamonds of commerce, luxury, and sight-seeing on the beautiful Mediterranean coast.

Just as Afghanistan proved to be the graveyard of empires, the intractable problem of Palestinian hatred toward Israel has been the graveyard of peace plans.  However, Trump's out-of-the-box thinking, his clamping down on past Palestinian demands, and his skills as a negotiator, combined with Israel repositioning itself as a major natural gas exporter and a partner with a variety of Arab countries worried about Iran, may finally shut that graveyard down and bring about a workable peace plan.

Correction made substituting Trump for Obama