Smelling blood in the water, Bernie and his supporters attack Warren

In 2016, Bernie Sanders, who exemplifies the spit-flecked angry old man yelling at the sky, nevertheless thought it would be a good tactic not to attack Hillary.  Perhaps he feared that it would make him look too much like Trump or maybe he was truly was worried about party unity.

To Bernie's cost, though, Hillary and the Democrat establishment had no such scruples and worked the system to ensure that Bernie could not be the Democrat nominee.  It was, after all, "Hillary's turn."

Bernie's not making the same mistake twice.  With the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary just around the corner and with Bernie unexpectedly soaring in the polls, reports are that Bernie is in take-no-prisoners mode when it comes to Elizabeth Warren, the candidate closest to him ideologically:

Since the start of this campaign, Sanders and Warren have played nice with one another.

Political reality always dictated that kumbaya view wouldn't last — since both candidates are trying to consolidate liberals behind their candidacy.

Sanders appears to have broken that pact, with Politico reporting that the Vermont senator's campaign is circulating talking points to supporters and surrogates that claim that Warren is the candidate of "highly-educated, more affluent people" — aka the elites.

The Sanders camp is also making the case that Warren voters will be with the party no matter who the nominee is while his voters — younger, more working class — might not show up if the Vermont senator isn't the nominee.

It's funny to see one millionaire socialist attack another millionaire socialist for being a limousine liberal, but that's the state of the Democrat party today.

Elizabeth Warren, by the way, isn't taking the attacks lying down.  In true Democrat fashion, she's complaining that she's a victim:

Speaking on Sunday in Iowa, Warren, D-Mass., said she was disappointed in the talking points from Sanders' campaign and said it ultimately will divide voters at the Democrats' peril.

"I was disappointed to hear that Bernie is sending his volunteers out to trash me," Warren told reporters. "Bernie knows me and has known me for a long time. He knows who I am, where I come from, what I have worked on and fought for."

She added: "Democrats want to win in 2020. We all saw the impact of the factionalism in 2016, and we can't have a repeat of that. Democrats need to unite our party, and that means pulling in all parts of the Democratic coalition."

Trump, wisely, is keeping his mouth shut about his Democrat opponents.  As he said during his recent rally in Toledo, Ohio, there's no benefit to him in giving his opponents a chance to hone their arguments and there's a lot of benefit in giving them free rein now, as they make impossible promises and paint America as an evil country.

In 2016, Bernie Sanders, who exemplifies the spit-flecked angry old man yelling at the sky, nevertheless thought it would be a good tactic not to attack Hillary.  Perhaps he feared that it would make him look too much like Trump or maybe he was truly was worried about party unity.

To Bernie's cost, though, Hillary and the Democrat establishment had no such scruples and worked the system to ensure that Bernie could not be the Democrat nominee.  It was, after all, "Hillary's turn."

Bernie's not making the same mistake twice.  With the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary just around the corner and with Bernie unexpectedly soaring in the polls, reports are that Bernie is in take-no-prisoners mode when it comes to Elizabeth Warren, the candidate closest to him ideologically:

Since the start of this campaign, Sanders and Warren have played nice with one another.

Political reality always dictated that kumbaya view wouldn't last — since both candidates are trying to consolidate liberals behind their candidacy.

Sanders appears to have broken that pact, with Politico reporting that the Vermont senator's campaign is circulating talking points to supporters and surrogates that claim that Warren is the candidate of "highly-educated, more affluent people" — aka the elites.

The Sanders camp is also making the case that Warren voters will be with the party no matter who the nominee is while his voters — younger, more working class — might not show up if the Vermont senator isn't the nominee.

It's funny to see one millionaire socialist attack another millionaire socialist for being a limousine liberal, but that's the state of the Democrat party today.

Elizabeth Warren, by the way, isn't taking the attacks lying down.  In true Democrat fashion, she's complaining that she's a victim:

Speaking on Sunday in Iowa, Warren, D-Mass., said she was disappointed in the talking points from Sanders' campaign and said it ultimately will divide voters at the Democrats' peril.

"I was disappointed to hear that Bernie is sending his volunteers out to trash me," Warren told reporters. "Bernie knows me and has known me for a long time. He knows who I am, where I come from, what I have worked on and fought for."

She added: "Democrats want to win in 2020. We all saw the impact of the factionalism in 2016, and we can't have a repeat of that. Democrats need to unite our party, and that means pulling in all parts of the Democratic coalition."

Trump, wisely, is keeping his mouth shut about his Democrat opponents.  As he said during his recent rally in Toledo, Ohio, there's no benefit to him in giving his opponents a chance to hone their arguments and there's a lot of benefit in giving them free rein now, as they make impossible promises and paint America as an evil country.