Michelle Williams proudly says Golden Globe meant her abortion was worth it

Showing how important Hollywood still is to America's political and social discourse, Ricky Gervais's opening monologue at Sunday night's Golden Globes dominated Monday's news and social media — and deservedly so, for he told the truth directly to Hollywood's morally bankrupt, hypocritical "royalty."  There was another speech at the Golden Globes, though, that truly revealed how bereft of moral decency Hollywood has become.

Michelle Williams took home a best actress award for her role as Gwen Verdon in an FX miniseries, Fosse/Verdon.  As is the case with so many actors receiving awards, the visibly pregnant Williams used the opportunity to give thanks.  Most actors thank their directors, writers, and cast members.  Many thank their family.  A few thank God.  And then there's Williams, who thanked her abortion (or, as she called it, her "employing a woman's right to choose"):

I'm grateful for the acknowledgment of the choices I've made, and I'm also grateful to have lived at a moment in our society where choice exists because as women and as girls, things can happen to our bodies that are not our choice. I've tried my very best to live a life of my own making and not just a series of events that happened to me, but one that I can stand back and look at and recognize my handwriting all over — sometimes messy and scrawling, sometimes careful and precise, but one that I carved with my own hand. I wouldn't have been able to do this without employing a woman's right to choose. To choose when to have my children and with whom. When I felt supported and able to balance our lives knowing as all mothers know that the scales must and will tip towards our children, now[.]

I know my choices might look different than yours. But thank God, or whomever you pray to, that we live in a country founded on the principle that I am free to live by my faith and you are free to live by yours. Women, 18 to 118, when it is time to vote, please do so in your own self-interest. It's what men have been doing for years. It's what men have been doing for years, which is why the world looks so much like them. Don't forget: We are the largest voting body in this country. Let's make it look more like us. Tommy and Matilda, I can't wait to come home to you.

Think for a moment about what Williams said. Even while shouting her abortion, she shied away from the word "pregnancy," a concept inextricably associated with a baby.  Instead, she went for a euphemism: "things can happen to our bodies that are not our choice."

That statement is true...but only if a woman, God forbid, is raped.  Otherwise, when women voluntarily have sex, unless they are beyond ignorant, they're making a choice that they know can result in pregnancy.

Having identified pregnancy as something over which she had no control, Williams went on to say that the all-important Golden Globe clutched in her hand came about because she chose to terminate a life.  Progressives, naturally, were rapturous.  Here are just a few examples:

Glamour Magazine, which is aimed at the 20-something crowd and for many decades after its founding was considered the fashion magazine for wholesome young women, was also thrilled:

Michelle Williams may just be the best speech giver in all of Hollywood. Truly, it seems that every time she wins an award, she creates a cultural moment with her powerful words—and she did it again Sunday at the Golden Globes while accepting her prize for best performance by an actress in a limited series or motion picture made for television for her role as Broadway icon Gwen Verdon in FX's Fosse/Verdon.

[snip]

Read her entire speech below — it's worth it.

[snip]

Let's just give Michelle Williams all the awards, all the time.

Once upon a time, the Clintons and their crowd advanced the mantra that abortion should be "safe, legal, and rare."  The premise was that only women in dire need would have abortions.

The imagery used was of the pregnant, naïve young woman, abandoned by a rakish and rape-ish young man, cast out into a snowstorm by her stern, loveless father.  Or maybe we were made to think of the 30-year-old woman who looks 100, standing in a shabby kitchen, pregnant, with a baby in her arms, and surrounded by a dozen dirty children.  These were women who had pregnancy thrust upon them and needed succor in the form of an abortion.

Nowadays, it's different.  We have sex ed.  We have birth control, including for 12-year-old girls, even without parental permission.  We have complete social acceptance of single motherhood.  And of course, we have abortion on demand, with legal abortion in some places stretching right up until moments before natural birth.

Once the hard-luck stories stopped resonating, the pro-abortion crowd switched tactics: don't be embarrassed about aborting a child.  Do what Williams did, and "shout your abortion."  Get an abortion so you won't have to buy bulk mayonnaise at Costco.  End a pregnancy so you won't be "punished with a baby."  And most importantly, remember that it's a wise choice to abort your child so you can win that Golden Globe.  Do it because your life matters...and no one else's does.

It's not entirely clear that this appeal to ego, rather than pathos, will work.  While Progressive women may love the idea of putting themselves first, Progressive men may love consequence-free sex, and pedophiles may love disposing of DNA evidence of a crime, it's possible that normal people will find this campaign off-putting.

After all, it's one thing to believe you're supporting a policy that relieves women from undeserved misery; it's another thing to celebrate the death of a living being so an actress can win an award.

Showing how important Hollywood still is to America's political and social discourse, Ricky Gervais's opening monologue at Sunday night's Golden Globes dominated Monday's news and social media — and deservedly so, for he told the truth directly to Hollywood's morally bankrupt, hypocritical "royalty."  There was another speech at the Golden Globes, though, that truly revealed how bereft of moral decency Hollywood has become.

Michelle Williams took home a best actress award for her role as Gwen Verdon in an FX miniseries, Fosse/Verdon.  As is the case with so many actors receiving awards, the visibly pregnant Williams used the opportunity to give thanks.  Most actors thank their directors, writers, and cast members.  Many thank their family.  A few thank God.  And then there's Williams, who thanked her abortion (or, as she called it, her "employing a woman's right to choose"):

I'm grateful for the acknowledgment of the choices I've made, and I'm also grateful to have lived at a moment in our society where choice exists because as women and as girls, things can happen to our bodies that are not our choice. I've tried my very best to live a life of my own making and not just a series of events that happened to me, but one that I can stand back and look at and recognize my handwriting all over — sometimes messy and scrawling, sometimes careful and precise, but one that I carved with my own hand. I wouldn't have been able to do this without employing a woman's right to choose. To choose when to have my children and with whom. When I felt supported and able to balance our lives knowing as all mothers know that the scales must and will tip towards our children, now[.]

I know my choices might look different than yours. But thank God, or whomever you pray to, that we live in a country founded on the principle that I am free to live by my faith and you are free to live by yours. Women, 18 to 118, when it is time to vote, please do so in your own self-interest. It's what men have been doing for years. It's what men have been doing for years, which is why the world looks so much like them. Don't forget: We are the largest voting body in this country. Let's make it look more like us. Tommy and Matilda, I can't wait to come home to you.

Think for a moment about what Williams said. Even while shouting her abortion, she shied away from the word "pregnancy," a concept inextricably associated with a baby.  Instead, she went for a euphemism: "things can happen to our bodies that are not our choice."

That statement is true...but only if a woman, God forbid, is raped.  Otherwise, when women voluntarily have sex, unless they are beyond ignorant, they're making a choice that they know can result in pregnancy.

Having identified pregnancy as something over which she had no control, Williams went on to say that the all-important Golden Globe clutched in her hand came about because she chose to terminate a life.  Progressives, naturally, were rapturous.  Here are just a few examples:

Glamour Magazine, which is aimed at the 20-something crowd and for many decades after its founding was considered the fashion magazine for wholesome young women, was also thrilled:

Michelle Williams may just be the best speech giver in all of Hollywood. Truly, it seems that every time she wins an award, she creates a cultural moment with her powerful words—and she did it again Sunday at the Golden Globes while accepting her prize for best performance by an actress in a limited series or motion picture made for television for her role as Broadway icon Gwen Verdon in FX's Fosse/Verdon.

[snip]

Read her entire speech below — it's worth it.

[snip]

Let's just give Michelle Williams all the awards, all the time.

Once upon a time, the Clintons and their crowd advanced the mantra that abortion should be "safe, legal, and rare."  The premise was that only women in dire need would have abortions.

The imagery used was of the pregnant, naïve young woman, abandoned by a rakish and rape-ish young man, cast out into a snowstorm by her stern, loveless father.  Or maybe we were made to think of the 30-year-old woman who looks 100, standing in a shabby kitchen, pregnant, with a baby in her arms, and surrounded by a dozen dirty children.  These were women who had pregnancy thrust upon them and needed succor in the form of an abortion.

Nowadays, it's different.  We have sex ed.  We have birth control, including for 12-year-old girls, even without parental permission.  We have complete social acceptance of single motherhood.  And of course, we have abortion on demand, with legal abortion in some places stretching right up until moments before natural birth.

Once the hard-luck stories stopped resonating, the pro-abortion crowd switched tactics: don't be embarrassed about aborting a child.  Do what Williams did, and "shout your abortion."  Get an abortion so you won't have to buy bulk mayonnaise at Costco.  End a pregnancy so you won't be "punished with a baby."  And most importantly, remember that it's a wise choice to abort your child so you can win that Golden Globe.  Do it because your life matters...and no one else's does.

It's not entirely clear that this appeal to ego, rather than pathos, will work.  While Progressive women may love the idea of putting themselves first, Progressive men may love consequence-free sex, and pedophiles may love disposing of DNA evidence of a crime, it's possible that normal people will find this campaign off-putting.

After all, it's one thing to believe you're supporting a policy that relieves women from undeserved misery; it's another thing to celebrate the death of a living being so an actress can win an award.