In the Weinstein trial, a woman testifies that Weinstein raped her twice

Mimi Haley (née Haleyi), a former production assistant on Project Runway, testified on Monday at the criminal trial against Harvey Weinstein.  The rape charges against Weinstein are based upon Haley's allegations, as well as those of Jessica Mann.

What was strange about the testimony is Haley's admission that, despite Weinstein's having already raped her, she voluntarily spent time alone with him, only to have him rape her a second time:

A former production assistant for Project Runway testified in court Monday that she "felt like an idiot" for visiting Harvey Weinstein at his hotel after the first time the allegedly raped her.

[snip]

Haley, the second accuser to take the stand at the disgraced Hollywood producer's rape trial, said she did not initially consider the second attack to be a rape at the time that it happened, because she had voluntarily gone to meet with him, in an attempt to reclaim "some power" following the first assault.

[snip]

Haley, 42, testified that she met Weinstein in 2004 when they were introduced by a mutual friend.

She ran into Weinstein again about two years later at the Cannes Film Festival. At the time, she was out of work and in need of money, so she asked Weinstein if he had any projects in New York that she could work on.

He invited her to the Weinstein Company's office at the Majestic Hotel in Cannes, Haley said.

"The conversation began normally. He was friendly. But soon he began to comment on my appearance. I remember he said something about my legs, which I thought was odd," she said.

Eventually, Weinstein requested mutual massages, at which time Haley left, "feeling completely humiliated." Still, he offered her a job, and she accepted.

When Haley ran into Weinstein again, she shared a ride with him, at which time he invited her to Paris for a fashion show.  Eventually, he stood outside her apartment and phoned her repeatedly.  Later, she went at his request to his SoHo apartment, where he raped her for the first time.  Haley didn't tell the police because she was working illegally in the United States.  One of the pitfalls of behaving illegally is that you deprive yourself of the benefits of law enforcement.

One would think all of these nasty, obsessive, criminal interactions would have put Haley off spending time close to Weinstein.  That's not what happened, though.  Instead, Haley went right back to him:

When Weinstein called her about three weeks later, asking her to meet him at his hotel in Tribeca, Haley said she went.

"To my mind, I thought I was reclaiming some of my power," she testified. "He was very persistent in his way. Almost instantly he pulled me by my hand toward the bed. At that point...I just went numb and thought...here we go again. I just thought...I'm an idiot." Haley said, pausing her testimony as she wept.

That "reclaiming some of my power" language shows just how much women's lib has to answer for.  You are not reclaiming anything when you're working in the country illegally, without recourse to the law, and then voluntarily place yourself again in the hands of a dangerous rapist.

The fact that Haley was with Weinstein voluntarily the second time and, from her testimony, was passive as he led her to the bed, means that, from Weinstein's perspective — and this is true no matter how vile and disgusting he is, as well as being true if his first interaction with her was rape — the sex was consensual.  He pulled her to bed and she went.  Even Haley conceded that, at the time it happened, she couldn't call it rape.  "'The second time, I had gone there myself, and I blame myself,' she said."  Well...yes.

Dr. Barbara Ziv, an expert on sexual assault who testified last week, said rape victims often return to the person who raped them.  Her explanation, as reported in the BuzzFeed article quoted from above, is muddled:

"Often what happens, honestly, is if women go back to have contact with the perpetrator — which they almost always do — believing, OK, we can go back to square one, and a second sexual assault occurs, it is more devastating for that person," Ziv said last week. "The first response that women who are sexually assaulted have is to blame themselves, it is another part of the rape myth, that you have done something to bring this on you. That is not true. But women think, Oh my god, I was an idiot. What was I thinking? — without knowing their behavior is actually entirely expected."

There is no question that Weinstein is a brute: a sociopathic, manipulative man who bullied women desperate for work to have sex with him, and it seems clear that he also engaged in forcible rape against several women.  However — and this is a terribly un-feminist, un-#MeToo thing to say — what becomes clear over and over again as one reads about the women who ended up experiencing revolting sex with him is that these women made choices that their mothers would have warned them not to make: don't be alone in a hotel room or apartment with a man who has a reputation for rape.  If he rapes you once, don't go back.  And you really need to ask yourself if a job in Hollywood is so important that you're willing to give up your self-respect to get it.

Taking the long view of Weinstein's depredations, it's tremendously sad that the lure of Hollywood has led so many vulnerable women to make terrible decisions that put them at the mercy of a sociopath.

Mimi Haley (née Haleyi), a former production assistant on Project Runway, testified on Monday at the criminal trial against Harvey Weinstein.  The rape charges against Weinstein are based upon Haley's allegations, as well as those of Jessica Mann.

What was strange about the testimony is Haley's admission that, despite Weinstein's having already raped her, she voluntarily spent time alone with him, only to have him rape her a second time:

A former production assistant for Project Runway testified in court Monday that she "felt like an idiot" for visiting Harvey Weinstein at his hotel after the first time the allegedly raped her.

[snip]

Haley, the second accuser to take the stand at the disgraced Hollywood producer's rape trial, said she did not initially consider the second attack to be a rape at the time that it happened, because she had voluntarily gone to meet with him, in an attempt to reclaim "some power" following the first assault.

[snip]

Haley, 42, testified that she met Weinstein in 2004 when they were introduced by a mutual friend.

She ran into Weinstein again about two years later at the Cannes Film Festival. At the time, she was out of work and in need of money, so she asked Weinstein if he had any projects in New York that she could work on.

He invited her to the Weinstein Company's office at the Majestic Hotel in Cannes, Haley said.

"The conversation began normally. He was friendly. But soon he began to comment on my appearance. I remember he said something about my legs, which I thought was odd," she said.

Eventually, Weinstein requested mutual massages, at which time Haley left, "feeling completely humiliated." Still, he offered her a job, and she accepted.

When Haley ran into Weinstein again, she shared a ride with him, at which time he invited her to Paris for a fashion show.  Eventually, he stood outside her apartment and phoned her repeatedly.  Later, she went at his request to his SoHo apartment, where he raped her for the first time.  Haley didn't tell the police because she was working illegally in the United States.  One of the pitfalls of behaving illegally is that you deprive yourself of the benefits of law enforcement.

One would think all of these nasty, obsessive, criminal interactions would have put Haley off spending time close to Weinstein.  That's not what happened, though.  Instead, Haley went right back to him:

When Weinstein called her about three weeks later, asking her to meet him at his hotel in Tribeca, Haley said she went.

"To my mind, I thought I was reclaiming some of my power," she testified. "He was very persistent in his way. Almost instantly he pulled me by my hand toward the bed. At that point...I just went numb and thought...here we go again. I just thought...I'm an idiot." Haley said, pausing her testimony as she wept.

That "reclaiming some of my power" language shows just how much women's lib has to answer for.  You are not reclaiming anything when you're working in the country illegally, without recourse to the law, and then voluntarily place yourself again in the hands of a dangerous rapist.

The fact that Haley was with Weinstein voluntarily the second time and, from her testimony, was passive as he led her to the bed, means that, from Weinstein's perspective — and this is true no matter how vile and disgusting he is, as well as being true if his first interaction with her was rape — the sex was consensual.  He pulled her to bed and she went.  Even Haley conceded that, at the time it happened, she couldn't call it rape.  "'The second time, I had gone there myself, and I blame myself,' she said."  Well...yes.

Dr. Barbara Ziv, an expert on sexual assault who testified last week, said rape victims often return to the person who raped them.  Her explanation, as reported in the BuzzFeed article quoted from above, is muddled:

"Often what happens, honestly, is if women go back to have contact with the perpetrator — which they almost always do — believing, OK, we can go back to square one, and a second sexual assault occurs, it is more devastating for that person," Ziv said last week. "The first response that women who are sexually assaulted have is to blame themselves, it is another part of the rape myth, that you have done something to bring this on you. That is not true. But women think, Oh my god, I was an idiot. What was I thinking? — without knowing their behavior is actually entirely expected."

There is no question that Weinstein is a brute: a sociopathic, manipulative man who bullied women desperate for work to have sex with him, and it seems clear that he also engaged in forcible rape against several women.  However — and this is a terribly un-feminist, un-#MeToo thing to say — what becomes clear over and over again as one reads about the women who ended up experiencing revolting sex with him is that these women made choices that their mothers would have warned them not to make: don't be alone in a hotel room or apartment with a man who has a reputation for rape.  If he rapes you once, don't go back.  And you really need to ask yourself if a job in Hollywood is so important that you're willing to give up your self-respect to get it.

Taking the long view of Weinstein's depredations, it's tremendously sad that the lure of Hollywood has led so many vulnerable women to make terrible decisions that put them at the mercy of a sociopath.