If you think Trump gave a great speech, you are correct

Wednesday morning, President Donald Trump stepped up to the podium and, backed by his advisers and the Joint Chiefs, spoke directly to the American people for the first time since he ordered the targeted strike on Iraqi soil against Qassem Soleimani, Iran's terrorism mastermind.  During the speech, which took less than ten minutes, Trump spoke in slow, measured terms that demonstrated both leadership and fatigue.

Shortly after Trump concluded his speech, Scott Adams, whose specialty, aside from writing one of the world's most popular cartoon strips, is persuasion, put out a tweet stating that Trump's speech was one of the best presidential speeches ever:

 

 

Adams is correct about the power behind Trump's statement to the American people, to Iran, and to the world.  In straightforward, lucid terms, Trump hit all the appropriate notes.  His very first sentence was one of incredible power:

As long as I am President of the United States, Iran will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon.

From that opening, Trump set out several important facts and principles:

First, the Iranian ballistic missile strike did not kill or injure any Americans.

Second, Iran has been a destabilizing force in the world since 1979.

Third, Soleimani was directly responsible for terrorist attacks against civilians and American troops inside and out of the Middle East, as well as being responsible for the deaths of his own countrymen.

Fourth, ever since 2013, when President Obama foolishly freed up $150 billion in assets and $1.8 billion in cash, Iran has been on a terror spree in Yemen, Syria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, and Iraq.  American taxpayers funded this terrorism, including Monday night's missile attacks.

Fifth, there can be no peace in the Middle East as long as Iran is not reined in.  NATO, Russia, and China need to join with America to make that happen.

Sixth, Iran can proceed as it has, or it can abandon its evil ways and become a thriving nation, one that partners with the West to everyone's benefit.

Trump closed the speech with a reminder that the American military is the most powerful and effective in the world.  Trump noted explicitly that the military can partner with Iran to continue to wipe out ISIS and implied obliquely that the military can also be used to destroy Iran.

In sum, Trump said to Iran, play nicely with us, and you will prosper in ways you never imagined; continue as you have been, and our powerful American military will destroy you.

Trump's mien, delivery, and words were those of a statesman.  This was not a madman with a military at his disposal.  Instead, Trump is a man who desires peace but will make war, if necessary, to defend his nation.  For those watching, he presented a strong contrast to Democrats who are so lost in Trump-hatred that they have accepted Iran's interests and narratives as their guiding principles.

You can find a full transcript of the speech here.

 

 

Wednesday morning, President Donald Trump stepped up to the podium and, backed by his advisers and the Joint Chiefs, spoke directly to the American people for the first time since he ordered the targeted strike on Iraqi soil against Qassem Soleimani, Iran's terrorism mastermind.  During the speech, which took less than ten minutes, Trump spoke in slow, measured terms that demonstrated both leadership and fatigue.

Shortly after Trump concluded his speech, Scott Adams, whose specialty, aside from writing one of the world's most popular cartoon strips, is persuasion, put out a tweet stating that Trump's speech was one of the best presidential speeches ever:

 

 

Adams is correct about the power behind Trump's statement to the American people, to Iran, and to the world.  In straightforward, lucid terms, Trump hit all the appropriate notes.  His very first sentence was one of incredible power:

As long as I am President of the United States, Iran will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon.

From that opening, Trump set out several important facts and principles:

First, the Iranian ballistic missile strike did not kill or injure any Americans.

Second, Iran has been a destabilizing force in the world since 1979.

Third, Soleimani was directly responsible for terrorist attacks against civilians and American troops inside and out of the Middle East, as well as being responsible for the deaths of his own countrymen.

Fourth, ever since 2013, when President Obama foolishly freed up $150 billion in assets and $1.8 billion in cash, Iran has been on a terror spree in Yemen, Syria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, and Iraq.  American taxpayers funded this terrorism, including Monday night's missile attacks.

Fifth, there can be no peace in the Middle East as long as Iran is not reined in.  NATO, Russia, and China need to join with America to make that happen.

Sixth, Iran can proceed as it has, or it can abandon its evil ways and become a thriving nation, one that partners with the West to everyone's benefit.

Trump closed the speech with a reminder that the American military is the most powerful and effective in the world.  Trump noted explicitly that the military can partner with Iran to continue to wipe out ISIS and implied obliquely that the military can also be used to destroy Iran.

In sum, Trump said to Iran, play nicely with us, and you will prosper in ways you never imagined; continue as you have been, and our powerful American military will destroy you.

Trump's mien, delivery, and words were those of a statesman.  This was not a madman with a military at his disposal.  Instead, Trump is a man who desires peace but will make war, if necessary, to defend his nation.  For those watching, he presented a strong contrast to Democrats who are so lost in Trump-hatred that they have accepted Iran's interests and narratives as their guiding principles.

You can find a full transcript of the speech here.