Hot pursuit: Trump tells Iran's mullahs to get their dirty mitts off the protestors

President Trump is not letting Iran's mullahs off easy.

Following the spectacular rubout of Iranian terrorist chieftain Qassem Soleimani and the blunderous events in Iran that followed, Trump is now cheering, hard, for Iran's student protestors.

 

 

The demise of the terrorist mastermind, and then the series of wretched events -- funeral stampede, passenger jet full of Iranians and Iranian exiles shot down, pretty well sent out one message: That the mullahs are losing their grip. Sure, they can probably find some terrorist to replace Soleimani, but they picked an old guy, not a vicious young fanatic out to prove himself, and they're paranoid as heck among themselves, given that someone on the inside ratted out Soleimani's positions so the U.S hellfires could get a bead on him. Bottom line, the mullahs are out their evil genius. They're also exposed as losing control, what with the funeral mess and the airline shootdown.

In that scenario, people inside Iran know they can probably get away with stuff. Hence the protests. I took a trip to my old friend and classmate Borzou Daragahi's Twitter feed for a glimpse of how strongly the winds are blowing and he had a huge array of videos - a sampling:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His own point of view is on the left, so I can't agree with his anti-Trump take on things, but he's on target at noticing what's important in the Iranian protests - women, sizes, unusual cities etc.

The real game changer, though, is in this tweet.

 

 

The mullah minions tried to entice the students to stomp on the U.S. and Israeli flags, scribbled out on the asphalt and they wouldn't bite.

It sounds like they're pretty darn happy with Trump standing up for them, in stark contrast with President Obama, who, in 2009, resolutely refused to do what Trump did. This is no Eurotrash hate-America crowd. When your back's to the wall, you embrace those who stand up for you. In this regard, Obama failed to understand the times he was living in. He just wanted his treaty and the claps and praise from Europe as a result.

Trump is different. He may or may not have an effect on the mullah behavior, as the mullahs know full well what a threat to their grip on power these protests are, but the students are going to notice and they're going to feel courage. As for the mullahs, Soleimani's killing was a game changer for them. They're now on notice that the usual rules don't apply. That leaves them sailing a narrow passage betweet the Scylla of student protests that threaten their regime, and displeasing Trump, who has a funny way of raining some devastating death on them when they least expect it. He's not bothered by the fetters of the left wherever it may be. 

Hot pursuit, they call it. All good generals do it. Right now, Trump's trapped the mullahs into a weak spot and instead of pull back, he's pushing down even harder. And he may just get results. Leadership, they call it.

Image credit: Twitter screen shot

 

President Trump is not letting Iran's mullahs off easy.

Following the spectacular rubout of Iranian terrorist chieftain Qassem Soleimani and the blunderous events in Iran that followed, Trump is now cheering, hard, for Iran's student protestors.

 

 

The demise of the terrorist mastermind, and then the series of wretched events -- funeral stampede, passenger jet full of Iranians and Iranian exiles shot down, pretty well sent out one message: That the mullahs are losing their grip. Sure, they can probably find some terrorist to replace Soleimani, but they picked an old guy, not a vicious young fanatic out to prove himself, and they're paranoid as heck among themselves, given that someone on the inside ratted out Soleimani's positions so the U.S hellfires could get a bead on him. Bottom line, the mullahs are out their evil genius. They're also exposed as losing control, what with the funeral mess and the airline shootdown.

In that scenario, people inside Iran know they can probably get away with stuff. Hence the protests. I took a trip to my old friend and classmate Borzou Daragahi's Twitter feed for a glimpse of how strongly the winds are blowing and he had a huge array of videos - a sampling:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His own point of view is on the left, so I can't agree with his anti-Trump take on things, but he's on target at noticing what's important in the Iranian protests - women, sizes, unusual cities etc.

The real game changer, though, is in this tweet.

 

 

The mullah minions tried to entice the students to stomp on the U.S. and Israeli flags, scribbled out on the asphalt and they wouldn't bite.

It sounds like they're pretty darn happy with Trump standing up for them, in stark contrast with President Obama, who, in 2009, resolutely refused to do what Trump did. This is no Eurotrash hate-America crowd. When your back's to the wall, you embrace those who stand up for you. In this regard, Obama failed to understand the times he was living in. He just wanted his treaty and the claps and praise from Europe as a result.

Trump is different. He may or may not have an effect on the mullah behavior, as the mullahs know full well what a threat to their grip on power these protests are, but the students are going to notice and they're going to feel courage. As for the mullahs, Soleimani's killing was a game changer for them. They're now on notice that the usual rules don't apply. That leaves them sailing a narrow passage betweet the Scylla of student protests that threaten their regime, and displeasing Trump, who has a funny way of raining some devastating death on them when they least expect it. He's not bothered by the fetters of the left wherever it may be. 

Hot pursuit, they call it. All good generals do it. Right now, Trump's trapped the mullahs into a weak spot and instead of pull back, he's pushing down even harder. And he may just get results. Leadership, they call it.

Image credit: Twitter screen shot