Democrats worry that Super Tuesday won't leave them with a candidate

Historically, after Super Tuesday in early March, a leader emerges from the primaries, allowing party money and machinery to consolidate around one person.  This year, Democrat party insiders worry that Super Tuesday will end without any candidate holding a clear lead, leaving room for Mike Bloomberg to buy his way into the election:

Democrats are now beginning to confront a very real scenario where the nomination — and the winnowing — will not be decided in states where campaigns have been plowing ground for more than a year, but in places and calendar dates so deep into primary season that until recently they've received almost no attention at all.

The Iowa field is bunched together with little daylight between a handful of well-funded candidates. Each of the four early voting states continues to present the prospect of a different winner. And, at the end of that gauntlet on Super Tuesday, a free-spending billionaire — Michael Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor — is waiting to challenge whichever candidate or candidates emerge.

[snip]

Looking at the possibility of a still-contested nomination even after Super Tuesday's massive delegate allocation on March 3, Washington state Democratic Party chair Tina Podlodowski said mid-March will "probably matter more than ever before."

One strategist working with a presidential candidate said, "We've never had a situation where we get past Super Tuesday and there's still five people in the field," predicting that possibility this year.

"We're in bizarro world here," the strategist said.

Currently, each of the remaining candidates who has a chance appeals to and offends different core Democrat demographics:

The elderly, white Bernie Sanders, an open socialist, has the greatest appeal to young voters marinated in leftism throughout their school years.  To them, Bernie's authentic.  The vestiges of centrist Democrat voters remaining in the party find his socialism unappealing.

The elderly, white Elizabeth Warren, an anti-capitalist populist who is socialist but won't admit it, appeals to feminists and wonks.  Her endless self-serving lies; scolding tone; and complicated, unworkable policies offend a lot of the base.

The elderly, white Joe Biden, who's desperately trying to hang onto Obama's coattails, even as Obama keeps tugging them out of his gasp, holds a nostalgic Obama-era appeal to black voters.  Nevertheless, he's showing his flop sweat when he tries to get to the left of Bernie, his corruption is catching up with him, and he's getting (there are no other words for it) weird and confused.

The young white Pete Buttigieg is appealing because...  Well, we don't know why.  Aside from positioning himself as the gay Obama, he's inexperienced and has a mediocre track record as mayor.  He's the equivalent of a class valedictorian announcing he's running for president.  While his military service may appeal to the Heartland, most party faithful, especially the young, are not impressed.

The middle-aged white Amy Klobuchar has tried to position herself as a sensible mother figure, which mostly means she tries to broker other people's opinions at debates, which looks weak.  It doesn't help that behind that motherly persona, she has a reputation for being an unpleasant diva.

And finally, the young, Asian Andrew Yang hangs in there by virtue of looking sane and cracking sometimes amusing race-based jokes about Asians.  His sudden fundraising surge in December took him from has-been back to maybe.  Like Buttigieg, he's another high school valedictorian aiming high.

Despite their flaws, each of the above candidates is bringing in enough money to stay in the race.  That's a problem because, when a Democrat presidential candidate finally emerges, lots of voters will already have dug deep during the primaries and be unable, or unwilling, to cough up more money.

Meanwhile, hardcore Progressives find dismaying the leading candidates' whiteness.  Cory Booker is still out there campaigning for an offer to be vice president, but one can't ignore that candidates of color have not fared well with likely or registered Democrat voters.  Party faithful castigate Americans generally and Donald Trump specifically for this offense to identity politics, conveniently overlooking the fact that it's their own base giving the cold shoulder to minority candidates.

And all the while, per Politico, Bloomberg is waiting in the wings:

In addition to flooding the airwaves with television ads, Bloomberg has already put more than 200 staffers on the ground in states that vote in March and April. He traveled recently to Ohio and Michigan, where he has hired senior state-level staff and plans to open 9 offices and 12 offices, respectively.

His campaign told POLITICO he plans to open five offices in Missouri, 17 in Florida and 12 in Illinois.

"Before Bloomberg got in, I said whoever wins South Carolina on February 29 will be the nominee because of the momentum factor" coming out of the first four primary states, said Bob Mulholland, a Democratic National Committee member from California. "Bloomberg kind of puts a pause on that."

Even if Bloomberg manages to buy himself a candidacy, it's hard to imagine Americans being enthusiastic. It's noteworthy that Donald Trump, a billionaire (although not nearly as rich as Bloomberg), ran one of the most cost-efficient campaigns in recent American history, barely digging into his own pocket. Trump won because he spoke to the American people, not because he bought the American people.

Our prediction is that the Democrats will end up with a brokered convention — and no good options. They'll be stuck with an old socialist, a shrill socialist, a senile socialist wannabe, a socialist child, and a free-spending socialist/capitalist fusion with a tin ear. Buy popcorn, because this should be fun.

Historically, after Super Tuesday in early March, a leader emerges from the primaries, allowing party money and machinery to consolidate around one person.  This year, Democrat party insiders worry that Super Tuesday will end without any candidate holding a clear lead, leaving room for Mike Bloomberg to buy his way into the election:

Democrats are now beginning to confront a very real scenario where the nomination — and the winnowing — will not be decided in states where campaigns have been plowing ground for more than a year, but in places and calendar dates so deep into primary season that until recently they've received almost no attention at all.

The Iowa field is bunched together with little daylight between a handful of well-funded candidates. Each of the four early voting states continues to present the prospect of a different winner. And, at the end of that gauntlet on Super Tuesday, a free-spending billionaire — Michael Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor — is waiting to challenge whichever candidate or candidates emerge.

[snip]

Looking at the possibility of a still-contested nomination even after Super Tuesday's massive delegate allocation on March 3, Washington state Democratic Party chair Tina Podlodowski said mid-March will "probably matter more than ever before."

One strategist working with a presidential candidate said, "We've never had a situation where we get past Super Tuesday and there's still five people in the field," predicting that possibility this year.

"We're in bizarro world here," the strategist said.

Currently, each of the remaining candidates who has a chance appeals to and offends different core Democrat demographics:

The elderly, white Bernie Sanders, an open socialist, has the greatest appeal to young voters marinated in leftism throughout their school years.  To them, Bernie's authentic.  The vestiges of centrist Democrat voters remaining in the party find his socialism unappealing.

The elderly, white Elizabeth Warren, an anti-capitalist populist who is socialist but won't admit it, appeals to feminists and wonks.  Her endless self-serving lies; scolding tone; and complicated, unworkable policies offend a lot of the base.

The elderly, white Joe Biden, who's desperately trying to hang onto Obama's coattails, even as Obama keeps tugging them out of his gasp, holds a nostalgic Obama-era appeal to black voters.  Nevertheless, he's showing his flop sweat when he tries to get to the left of Bernie, his corruption is catching up with him, and he's getting (there are no other words for it) weird and confused.

The young white Pete Buttigieg is appealing because...  Well, we don't know why.  Aside from positioning himself as the gay Obama, he's inexperienced and has a mediocre track record as mayor.  He's the equivalent of a class valedictorian announcing he's running for president.  While his military service may appeal to the Heartland, most party faithful, especially the young, are not impressed.

The middle-aged white Amy Klobuchar has tried to position herself as a sensible mother figure, which mostly means she tries to broker other people's opinions at debates, which looks weak.  It doesn't help that behind that motherly persona, she has a reputation for being an unpleasant diva.

And finally, the young, Asian Andrew Yang hangs in there by virtue of looking sane and cracking sometimes amusing race-based jokes about Asians.  His sudden fundraising surge in December took him from has-been back to maybe.  Like Buttigieg, he's another high school valedictorian aiming high.

Despite their flaws, each of the above candidates is bringing in enough money to stay in the race.  That's a problem because, when a Democrat presidential candidate finally emerges, lots of voters will already have dug deep during the primaries and be unable, or unwilling, to cough up more money.

Meanwhile, hardcore Progressives find dismaying the leading candidates' whiteness.  Cory Booker is still out there campaigning for an offer to be vice president, but one can't ignore that candidates of color have not fared well with likely or registered Democrat voters.  Party faithful castigate Americans generally and Donald Trump specifically for this offense to identity politics, conveniently overlooking the fact that it's their own base giving the cold shoulder to minority candidates.

And all the while, per Politico, Bloomberg is waiting in the wings:

In addition to flooding the airwaves with television ads, Bloomberg has already put more than 200 staffers on the ground in states that vote in March and April. He traveled recently to Ohio and Michigan, where he has hired senior state-level staff and plans to open 9 offices and 12 offices, respectively.

His campaign told POLITICO he plans to open five offices in Missouri, 17 in Florida and 12 in Illinois.

"Before Bloomberg got in, I said whoever wins South Carolina on February 29 will be the nominee because of the momentum factor" coming out of the first four primary states, said Bob Mulholland, a Democratic National Committee member from California. "Bloomberg kind of puts a pause on that."

Even if Bloomberg manages to buy himself a candidacy, it's hard to imagine Americans being enthusiastic. It's noteworthy that Donald Trump, a billionaire (although not nearly as rich as Bloomberg), ran one of the most cost-efficient campaigns in recent American history, barely digging into his own pocket. Trump won because he spoke to the American people, not because he bought the American people.

Our prediction is that the Democrats will end up with a brokered convention — and no good options. They'll be stuck with an old socialist, a shrill socialist, a senile socialist wannabe, a socialist child, and a free-spending socialist/capitalist fusion with a tin ear. Buy popcorn, because this should be fun.