Buttigieg and other Democrats blame the US for the downed Ukrainian plane

Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old nonentity who dreams of taking the White House, announced that Trump and, by extension, the United States of America are responsible for the 176 souls killed in Iran when the Iranians shot down a Ukrainian jet.

Buttigieg, being a follower, not a leader, was late to the game.  Twitter-watchers had already noted that, within minutes of the Pentagon confirming that the Iranians had killed 176 people by shooting a passenger plane out of the sky, "crossfire" had become the word of the day:

This is yet another example of Leftists savaging the English language in an effort to control political discourse and gain power.  The word "crossfire," as any dictionary will say, means a situation in which two opposing sides are simultaneously firing at each other: "lines of gunfire from two or more positions or combatants crossing one another, or a single one of such lines."

In the case of the Ukrainian plane, there was no U.S. fire involved at all.  It was a case of Iran acting all by its lonesome, out of paranoia, because it had — without U.S. participation — fired 15 ballistic missiles at American troop locations.

There was no crossfire.  There was just fire.

Just to add a little more context, here's a quick overview showing how the firing has almost entirely been in one direction when it comes to Iran and America over the decades:

1979: Iranian radical Islamists attacked the U.S. embassy and held embassy workers hostage for 444 days.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

1983: The Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps ("IRGC") was behind the attack on the Marine barracks in Beirut, which killed 241 Americans, 58 Frenchmen, and 6 civilians.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

1988: An Iranian in the Persian Gulf struck the Samuel B. Roberts, almost sinking it.  Under President Reagan, the United States responded in meaningful fashion.  The U.S. Navy, in a single day, destroyed half of Iran's operational fleet.

1996: Qassem Soleimani and his IRGC were behind the Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 U.S. Air Force personnel.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2000: The IRGC was behind the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole, which killed 17 Americans.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2001: Iran worked with Osama bin Laden to facilitate the attack on September 11, 2001, which killed 2,996 people.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2003–the present: Soleimani's terrorist network and local proxies have been responsible for killing over 600 American troops, many with especially brutal roadside IEDs.  While the U.S. waged war against the proxies, it never took the war to Iran.

2011: Iran is behind an alleged plot to assassinate the Saudi ambassador to American by blowing up a restaurant in Washington, D.C.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2012: Soleimani helped plan the raid on Benghazi that killed an American ambassador and three other Americans.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2019: Iran shot down two U.S. drones.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2019: Kataeb Hezb'allah, an Iranian proxy under Soleimani's control, attacked an Iraqi military fort, killing one American contractor and wounding several troops.  For the first time in thirty years, American responded.  The Americans attacked a Kataeb Hezb'allah outpost, killing 25.  Kataeb Hezb'allah then attempted a repeat of 1979 by attacking the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.  Under President Trump, the military repelled the attack.

2020: President Trump ordered the death of Soleimani, a long identified terrorist, while he was illegally on Iraqi soil.  Also killed was Abu Mahdi al Muhandis, Kataeb Hezb'allah's commander.  Iran answered by firing 15 cruise missiles at Iraqi bases housing American and coalition troops.  The U.S. did not respond.  However, Iran followed its own ballistic missile strike by shooting down a Ukrainian passenger plane.  The Ukrainian plane's downing was not a "crossfire" incident.  Iran committed that act entirely by itself. 

When it comes to the Left's perversion of the word "crossfire," it's useful to go back to Orwell:

The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible. … Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the possibility of arriving at them by indirect methods. This was done partly by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and so far as possible of all secondary meanings whatever. —George Orwell, 1984.

Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old nonentity who dreams of taking the White House, announced that Trump and, by extension, the United States of America are responsible for the 176 souls killed in Iran when the Iranians shot down a Ukrainian jet.

Buttigieg, being a follower, not a leader, was late to the game.  Twitter-watchers had already noted that, within minutes of the Pentagon confirming that the Iranians had killed 176 people by shooting a passenger plane out of the sky, "crossfire" had become the word of the day:

This is yet another example of Leftists savaging the English language in an effort to control political discourse and gain power.  The word "crossfire," as any dictionary will say, means a situation in which two opposing sides are simultaneously firing at each other: "lines of gunfire from two or more positions or combatants crossing one another, or a single one of such lines."

In the case of the Ukrainian plane, there was no U.S. fire involved at all.  It was a case of Iran acting all by its lonesome, out of paranoia, because it had — without U.S. participation — fired 15 ballistic missiles at American troop locations.

There was no crossfire.  There was just fire.

Just to add a little more context, here's a quick overview showing how the firing has almost entirely been in one direction when it comes to Iran and America over the decades:

1979: Iranian radical Islamists attacked the U.S. embassy and held embassy workers hostage for 444 days.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

1983: The Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps ("IRGC") was behind the attack on the Marine barracks in Beirut, which killed 241 Americans, 58 Frenchmen, and 6 civilians.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

1988: An Iranian in the Persian Gulf struck the Samuel B. Roberts, almost sinking it.  Under President Reagan, the United States responded in meaningful fashion.  The U.S. Navy, in a single day, destroyed half of Iran's operational fleet.

1996: Qassem Soleimani and his IRGC were behind the Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 U.S. Air Force personnel.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2000: The IRGC was behind the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole, which killed 17 Americans.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2001: Iran worked with Osama bin Laden to facilitate the attack on September 11, 2001, which killed 2,996 people.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2003–the present: Soleimani's terrorist network and local proxies have been responsible for killing over 600 American troops, many with especially brutal roadside IEDs.  While the U.S. waged war against the proxies, it never took the war to Iran.

2011: Iran is behind an alleged plot to assassinate the Saudi ambassador to American by blowing up a restaurant in Washington, D.C.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2012: Soleimani helped plan the raid on Benghazi that killed an American ambassador and three other Americans.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2019: Iran shot down two U.S. drones.  The U.S. did not make a military response to Iran's participation.

2019: Kataeb Hezb'allah, an Iranian proxy under Soleimani's control, attacked an Iraqi military fort, killing one American contractor and wounding several troops.  For the first time in thirty years, American responded.  The Americans attacked a Kataeb Hezb'allah outpost, killing 25.  Kataeb Hezb'allah then attempted a repeat of 1979 by attacking the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.  Under President Trump, the military repelled the attack.

2020: President Trump ordered the death of Soleimani, a long identified terrorist, while he was illegally on Iraqi soil.  Also killed was Abu Mahdi al Muhandis, Kataeb Hezb'allah's commander.  Iran answered by firing 15 cruise missiles at Iraqi bases housing American and coalition troops.  The U.S. did not respond.  However, Iran followed its own ballistic missile strike by shooting down a Ukrainian passenger plane.  The Ukrainian plane's downing was not a "crossfire" incident.  Iran committed that act entirely by itself. 

When it comes to the Left's perversion of the word "crossfire," it's useful to go back to Orwell:

The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible. … Its vocabulary was so constructed as to give exact and often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could properly wish to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the possibility of arriving at them by indirect methods. This was done partly by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and so far as possible of all secondary meanings whatever. —George Orwell, 1984.