A new initiative is afoot to bring conservatives out of the closet

There's an old idiom, "the worm turns," that describes a situation in which a weak person suddenly shifts and becomes strong and powerful.  For a long time, Leftist aggression and stridency have turned conservatives into worms.  That may finally be about to change.

Democrats might say there's nothing weak or powerless about Trump-supporters.  After all, their candidate is in the White House, and tens of thousands of people (to Progressives' great frustration) turn out for his rallies.  But speaking as someone who only recently came out of the conservative closet, while people can support Trump in the secrecy of the polls and in the security of other Trump-supporters, at work, at school, at stores, and in the neighborhood, they are routinely insulted, marginalized, defamed, and even attacked for their beliefs.

The most recent example of this comes from Stuart Reges, a gay, non-tenured professor at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering.  In 2018, after James Damore was fired for suggesting, among other things, that sex differences might account for women's low representation in the tech field, Reges wrote an article in which he acknowledged that women are making different career choices and suggested that understanding these choices would allow the tech field to increase women's representation.

For politely and respectfully engaging in an intellectual analysis of a quantifiable truth, Reges lost the job he'd held for fifteen years.  In his most recent article, he describes how, despite being a popular teacher with a 15-year track record, his article triggered an official review of  his class (with one of the suggestions being that he needed to change his introductory computer science class with "The addition of an indigenous land acknowledgement to the syllabus") that was then followed by his being demoted and put on probation.

While Reges's personal travails at the hands of a taxpayer-supported institution are disturbing, what's especially sad is the way he describes the secret life conservatives lead on campus.  After describing his own heartbreaking experiences as a young, closeted gay man in the mid-1970s, he notes the parallels between that and what conservatives experience today:

Over the course of my life, it has been astonishing to watch anti-gay sentiment reverse. Today, the people on campus who need to worry about expressing their ideas are conservatives and religious people. Now it is gays doing the punishing of anyone who opposes gay marriage, gay adoption, hate speech codes, and civil rights protection for gays. Everything old is new again. I'm once again having private conversations behind closed doors in my office with closeted individuals, but this time they are students, faculty, staff, and alumni who oppose the equity agenda. They are deeply concerned about the university's direction, but they are also afraid of jeopardizing their current or future job prospects. They also worry about losing friendships and professional relationships. One faculty colleague described it as "mob rule."

That's depressing.

However, things are changing, and a gay man is leading the charge.  Brendon Straka, the gay New York hairdresser who started the #Walkaway movement, has initiated a new political movement.  This time, Straka is speaking to people who have been forced into the closet because of their political views, something frighteningly un-American.  He calls it UNSILENT:

 

 

As someone who recently came out of the conservative closet herself, I can attest to the fact that it is remarkably liberating not to hide who you are and what you believe.  UNSILENT is the way to go.

 

 

There's an old idiom, "the worm turns," that describes a situation in which a weak person suddenly shifts and becomes strong and powerful.  For a long time, Leftist aggression and stridency have turned conservatives into worms.  That may finally be about to change.

Democrats might say there's nothing weak or powerless about Trump-supporters.  After all, their candidate is in the White House, and tens of thousands of people (to Progressives' great frustration) turn out for his rallies.  But speaking as someone who only recently came out of the conservative closet, while people can support Trump in the secrecy of the polls and in the security of other Trump-supporters, at work, at school, at stores, and in the neighborhood, they are routinely insulted, marginalized, defamed, and even attacked for their beliefs.

The most recent example of this comes from Stuart Reges, a gay, non-tenured professor at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering.  In 2018, after James Damore was fired for suggesting, among other things, that sex differences might account for women's low representation in the tech field, Reges wrote an article in which he acknowledged that women are making different career choices and suggested that understanding these choices would allow the tech field to increase women's representation.

For politely and respectfully engaging in an intellectual analysis of a quantifiable truth, Reges lost the job he'd held for fifteen years.  In his most recent article, he describes how, despite being a popular teacher with a 15-year track record, his article triggered an official review of  his class (with one of the suggestions being that he needed to change his introductory computer science class with "The addition of an indigenous land acknowledgement to the syllabus") that was then followed by his being demoted and put on probation.

While Reges's personal travails at the hands of a taxpayer-supported institution are disturbing, what's especially sad is the way he describes the secret life conservatives lead on campus.  After describing his own heartbreaking experiences as a young, closeted gay man in the mid-1970s, he notes the parallels between that and what conservatives experience today:

Over the course of my life, it has been astonishing to watch anti-gay sentiment reverse. Today, the people on campus who need to worry about expressing their ideas are conservatives and religious people. Now it is gays doing the punishing of anyone who opposes gay marriage, gay adoption, hate speech codes, and civil rights protection for gays. Everything old is new again. I'm once again having private conversations behind closed doors in my office with closeted individuals, but this time they are students, faculty, staff, and alumni who oppose the equity agenda. They are deeply concerned about the university's direction, but they are also afraid of jeopardizing their current or future job prospects. They also worry about losing friendships and professional relationships. One faculty colleague described it as "mob rule."

That's depressing.

However, things are changing, and a gay man is leading the charge.  Brendon Straka, the gay New York hairdresser who started the #Walkaway movement, has initiated a new political movement.  This time, Straka is speaking to people who have been forced into the closet because of their political views, something frighteningly un-American.  He calls it UNSILENT:

 

 

As someone who recently came out of the conservative closet herself, I can attest to the fact that it is remarkably liberating not to hide who you are and what you believe.  UNSILENT is the way to go.