Western civilization's battle for survival and 'The Oath of the Horatii'

Jacques-Louis David's "The Oath of the Horatii" is one of those great works of art that spoke of true masculine valor, self-sacrifice, and fundamental willingness to defend one's nation.  Although David came out of the radicalism of the French Jacobinism of the revolutionary era of his nation, even then, there was still a deep-seated attachment to one's people — its past, culture, and traditions — even as the Jacobins excoriated so much of that during their reign.  It is a painting and a story that should resonate with us today, perhaps more so than ever.

We see the three male members of the Horatius family pledging in unison to fight for their people's cause.  This hearkens back to a historic understanding of masculinity that places one's family, a truer understanding of one's neighbors (as being of one's people), and one's nation at the apex of loyalty, fealty, and ultimate sacrifice.  Although drawn from an ancient pagan Classical Roman narrative, the message transcends culture and ethnicity, as well as belief — something that would easily correspond to Christian and other traditional religious beliefs that speak clearly of a man's role in standing for his people, whether they are of direct relation or more generally.

To the side, we see the women of this family, undoubtedly aware of and grieving for what may come.  Yet there is no sense that they are either pleading with the men to avoid conflict or that they'd scold them for their toxic masculinity; rather, there is a truly human sadness over what they know must be done, even if it means they will not see their male family members return alive.  Further, there is no dubiously constructive Progressive narrative of women as equally equipped combatants; they are true to the female norm and, therefore, an foundational feature for societal survival.

How does this painting connect to today?  Considering the growing social instability, the ever greater Progressive, globalist narrative and policies pushed on us to transform, even destroy Western civilization, I believe we are on the cusp of a similar time of upheaval that will require loyal sacrifice throughout the West.  Standing for one's people, even to the point of a real threat to one's livelihood or life, will become an all too common occurrence.

Yet it also speaks to a return to a greater sense of community and rebuilding these nations and to civilization on the whole.  It is by, much like with the Horatii, metaphorically crossing our swords to pledge an oath to one another as those of similar mind and purpose that we may, one day, salvage things.  This does not necessarily mean the use of force, though one should be prepared for this real possibility; it can also mean the more mundane things of returning to the old traditional ways of restoring a sense of order in our communities, being standard-bearers for principle-based morality (including strongly pushing against the narrative, not merely silently refusing to embrace it), and raising a family to go against the grain of modernity (and postmodernity), which includes not imbibing in the zeitgeist's idea of "smaller is better" (if one has children at all).

This must be done, or else we will almost certainly see our currently highly developed nations and wider civilization decline and fall forever.

Jacques-Louis David's "The Oath of the Horatii" is one of those great works of art that spoke of true masculine valor, self-sacrifice, and fundamental willingness to defend one's nation.  Although David came out of the radicalism of the French Jacobinism of the revolutionary era of his nation, even then, there was still a deep-seated attachment to one's people — its past, culture, and traditions — even as the Jacobins excoriated so much of that during their reign.  It is a painting and a story that should resonate with us today, perhaps more so than ever.

We see the three male members of the Horatius family pledging in unison to fight for their people's cause.  This hearkens back to a historic understanding of masculinity that places one's family, a truer understanding of one's neighbors (as being of one's people), and one's nation at the apex of loyalty, fealty, and ultimate sacrifice.  Although drawn from an ancient pagan Classical Roman narrative, the message transcends culture and ethnicity, as well as belief — something that would easily correspond to Christian and other traditional religious beliefs that speak clearly of a man's role in standing for his people, whether they are of direct relation or more generally.

To the side, we see the women of this family, undoubtedly aware of and grieving for what may come.  Yet there is no sense that they are either pleading with the men to avoid conflict or that they'd scold them for their toxic masculinity; rather, there is a truly human sadness over what they know must be done, even if it means they will not see their male family members return alive.  Further, there is no dubiously constructive Progressive narrative of women as equally equipped combatants; they are true to the female norm and, therefore, an foundational feature for societal survival.

How does this painting connect to today?  Considering the growing social instability, the ever greater Progressive, globalist narrative and policies pushed on us to transform, even destroy Western civilization, I believe we are on the cusp of a similar time of upheaval that will require loyal sacrifice throughout the West.  Standing for one's people, even to the point of a real threat to one's livelihood or life, will become an all too common occurrence.

Yet it also speaks to a return to a greater sense of community and rebuilding these nations and to civilization on the whole.  It is by, much like with the Horatii, metaphorically crossing our swords to pledge an oath to one another as those of similar mind and purpose that we may, one day, salvage things.  This does not necessarily mean the use of force, though one should be prepared for this real possibility; it can also mean the more mundane things of returning to the old traditional ways of restoring a sense of order in our communities, being standard-bearers for principle-based morality (including strongly pushing against the narrative, not merely silently refusing to embrace it), and raising a family to go against the grain of modernity (and postmodernity), which includes not imbibing in the zeitgeist's idea of "smaller is better" (if one has children at all).

This must be done, or else we will almost certainly see our currently highly developed nations and wider civilization decline and fall forever.