Press gulps as Team Trump unleashes a full-sail 2020 re-election plan

With the TV cameras focused on the impeachment of President Trump ahead of its inevitable failure, some of the savvier swamp journalists have cast a sidelong glance at how the Trump campaign is doing.  At least two of them could only see a helluva strong campaign.

Here are Jonathan Swan and Margaret Talev at Axios:

President Trump's re-election campaign wields more money, staff, infrastructure and advanced digital operations than the Democratic competitors — and a fan base that hears "impeachment" as a rallying cry.

Here's Maggie Haberman & Co. at the New York Times:

And while Mr. Trump himself has rued the fact that impeachment might tarnish his legacy, his top political advisers presented the unfolding proceeding as nothing but a boost to the campaign in every metric it measures, from volunteer recruitment to small-dollar donations.

"It lit up our base," [campaign operative] Mr. [Brad] Parscale said. "They see their vote is trying to be stolen from the 2016 election."

He added that impeachment meant that it took "less advertising" to fill up the stadiums where Mr. Trump holds rallies, and that it "puts money in our bank and adds volunteers to our field program."

Well, yeah.  Had to be painful for them to report this, which would explain why the Times buried the painful details deep at the bottom of the story.

Axios had a good list of "takeaways" from the briefing, which apparently the Trumpsters, led by Jared Kushner and Brad Parscale, were confident enough to let reporters hear about, which included the smart move to purge state organizations of NeverTrump clowns in leadership positions (who'd want to volunteer for Trump in states under such leadership?), a focus on "tiny" counties in the flyover disdained by leftists, which includes a plan to win Minnesota this time, a plan to encourage voters who sat home in the midterms because Trump's name wasn't on the ballot, a plan to win the black and Latino vote, a savvy use of impeachment to sell campaign merchandise and motivate voters, a plan to use tech techniques to capture data from rallies, and another plan to turn every Trump rally into "a four or five day event" in the locations where they happen.

Both reports said the Trump campaign was swimming in money, nearly a hundred million dollars, most of it from those low-dollar donors Democrats otherwise claim they "own."

Axios was able to swallow hard and man up to report these things, but the Times could barely stand it.  It reported far fewer of the juicy Axios details dear to the hearts of political junkies and focused instead on whataboutism, throwing out the argument again and again that Democrats are just as motivated as Trumpsters.

You can see who's more likely to get the scoop on election night and who's more likely to show the long face after the unpleasant surprise.  And the networks aren't even paying attention to this, so they'll likely be most surprised of all.

The only picture that came out from both reports is that Trump is running a helluva confident campaign and has a strong plan to do the Reagan-Mondale thing and win practically every state come November.

It's good news for Trump Republicans.  No wonder the lion's share of the reporters are miring themselves in that useless impeachment story and avoiding this powerful Trump re-election plan something fierce.  This won't end well for them.

Image credit: Photo illustration by Monica Showalter with use of public domain sources.

With the TV cameras focused on the impeachment of President Trump ahead of its inevitable failure, some of the savvier swamp journalists have cast a sidelong glance at how the Trump campaign is doing.  At least two of them could only see a helluva strong campaign.

Here are Jonathan Swan and Margaret Talev at Axios:

President Trump's re-election campaign wields more money, staff, infrastructure and advanced digital operations than the Democratic competitors — and a fan base that hears "impeachment" as a rallying cry.

Here's Maggie Haberman & Co. at the New York Times:

And while Mr. Trump himself has rued the fact that impeachment might tarnish his legacy, his top political advisers presented the unfolding proceeding as nothing but a boost to the campaign in every metric it measures, from volunteer recruitment to small-dollar donations.

"It lit up our base," [campaign operative] Mr. [Brad] Parscale said. "They see their vote is trying to be stolen from the 2016 election."

He added that impeachment meant that it took "less advertising" to fill up the stadiums where Mr. Trump holds rallies, and that it "puts money in our bank and adds volunteers to our field program."

Well, yeah.  Had to be painful for them to report this, which would explain why the Times buried the painful details deep at the bottom of the story.

Axios had a good list of "takeaways" from the briefing, which apparently the Trumpsters, led by Jared Kushner and Brad Parscale, were confident enough to let reporters hear about, which included the smart move to purge state organizations of NeverTrump clowns in leadership positions (who'd want to volunteer for Trump in states under such leadership?), a focus on "tiny" counties in the flyover disdained by leftists, which includes a plan to win Minnesota this time, a plan to encourage voters who sat home in the midterms because Trump's name wasn't on the ballot, a plan to win the black and Latino vote, a savvy use of impeachment to sell campaign merchandise and motivate voters, a plan to use tech techniques to capture data from rallies, and another plan to turn every Trump rally into "a four or five day event" in the locations where they happen.

Both reports said the Trump campaign was swimming in money, nearly a hundred million dollars, most of it from those low-dollar donors Democrats otherwise claim they "own."

Axios was able to swallow hard and man up to report these things, but the Times could barely stand it.  It reported far fewer of the juicy Axios details dear to the hearts of political junkies and focused instead on whataboutism, throwing out the argument again and again that Democrats are just as motivated as Trumpsters.

You can see who's more likely to get the scoop on election night and who's more likely to show the long face after the unpleasant surprise.  And the networks aren't even paying attention to this, so they'll likely be most surprised of all.

The only picture that came out from both reports is that Trump is running a helluva confident campaign and has a strong plan to do the Reagan-Mondale thing and win practically every state come November.

It's good news for Trump Republicans.  No wonder the lion's share of the reporters are miring themselves in that useless impeachment story and avoiding this powerful Trump re-election plan something fierce.  This won't end well for them.

Image credit: Photo illustration by Monica Showalter with use of public domain sources.