Lisa Page plays the victim card a week before Horowitz report to be released

In a story that doesn't hold together very well, Lisa Page launches her spin campaign just a week before the Department of Justice inspector general, Horowitz, is to release his report on the genesis of the investigation of candidate and then president Trump, in which Lisa Page was deeply implicated.  Speaking to Molly Jong-Fast of the Daily Beast, who is more than sympathetic, Page presents herself as a victim, with support from Jong-Fast (the daughter of two left-wing authors, Erica Jong and Jonathan Fast), such as this description:

[T]he MAGA meat grinder has clearly worn her down, not unlike the other women I've met who've been subjected to the president's abuse.  She is just slightly crumbly around the edges the way the president's other victims are.  

The theme is that the mean old Orange Man is picking on poor Lisa.

Trying to explain the timing of her speaking out in public, she makes a claim that doesn't withstand scrutiny:

For the nearly two years since her name first made the papers, she's been publicly silent (she did have a closed-door interview with House members in July 2018). I asked her why she was willing to talk now. "Honestly, his demeaning fake orgasm was really the straw that broke the camel's back," she says. The president called out her name as he acted out an orgasm in front of thousands of people at a Minneapolis rally on Oct. 11, 2019.

First of all, President Trump did not fake an orgasm.  Watch for yourself:

If that's what passes for an orgasm in Lisa's view, Peter Strzok is a lousy lover (which is no surprise, considering):

Here is what a genuine fake orgasm looks like:

Lisa hits feminist notes (of course):

"I had stayed quiet for years hoping it would fade away, but instead it got worse," she says. "It had been so hard not to defend myself, to let people who hate me control the narrative. I decided to take my power back." 

Jong-Fast resorts to trickery to claim that leaks (from whom?) indicate that Horowitz will "exonerate" her:

Leaked press accounts indicate that the report will exonerate Page of the allegation that she acted unprofessionally or showed bias against Trump.

The linked page says no such thing.

In painting herself as an innocent victim of Orange Man Bad, she claims she committed no crimes:

"It's almost impossible to describe" what it's like, she told me. "It's like being punched in the gut. My heart drops to my stomach when I realize he has tweeted about me again. The president of the United States is calling me names to the entire world. He's demeaning me and my career. It's sickening." 

"But it's also very intimidating because he's still the president of the United States. And when the president accuses you of treason by name, despite the fact that I know there's no fathomable way that I have committed any crime at all, let alone treason, he's still somebody in a position to actually do something about that. To try to further destroy my life. It never goes away or stops, even when he's not publicly attacking me."

Joe DiGenova, speaking on WMAL radio minutes ago, says this suggests Page has made a deal with prosecutors including a promise of no prosecution.  Otherwise, she would not be speaking out.

Sundance notices that Page's rehabilitation effort was actually kicked off by Lawfare founder Benjamin Wittes:

On November 8th of this year Lawfare founder Benjamin Wittes sent a rather curious tweet proclaiming his undying devotion to former FBI lawyer Lisa Page.  At the time it seemed rather odd and out of no-where; but today it makes sense.

At the time of Witte's tweet Lisa Page would have been scheduling her coming out narrative, and consulting with the DOJ/FBI "beach friend" community for PR advice.  After several weeks of planning and careful roll-out organization, noted by several weeks of contact with mutually aligned journalists, today Ms. Page steps into the spotlight with her introductory article in the Daily Beast, aptly titled: "Lisa Page Speaks". (snip)

When you read the article it jumps out at you. The victim narrative is from the exact same acting coaches hired by the FBI and used by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford; it's a little spooky how both Ms. Ford and Ms. Page could sound so identical, until you realize the same FBI and media people have constructed both victim storyboards.

Ms. Page decries what she has seen happen to her beloved FBI, that as she said "she grew up in".  Now, if that institutional attachment sounds a little over-the-top considering a grown woman started at the FBI in 2013 and resigned in 2018, well, it helps to remember this is the Public Relations advice from the DC-based FBI committee.

The DOJ/FBI 'above the law' crowd of beach friends assemble in the Lawfare conference room; look at the latest storyboards and plan the Lisa Page marketing, advertising and branding campaign.

She calls her adulterous affair with Peter Strzok "a deeply personal secret," even though it was a workplace affair with a colleague deeply involved with her in promoting the "insurance policy" against a Trump victory, and thus related to her official actions.

She claims: "She doesn't think for a minute that her texts with Peter Strzok are too political."

Yeah, right.

If this is the best defense she's got, there's trouble ahead for poor Lisa.


YouTube screen grab.

In a story that doesn't hold together very well, Lisa Page launches her spin campaign just a week before the Department of Justice inspector general, Horowitz, is to release his report on the genesis of the investigation of candidate and then president Trump, in which Lisa Page was deeply implicated.  Speaking to Molly Jong-Fast of the Daily Beast, who is more than sympathetic, Page presents herself as a victim, with support from Jong-Fast (the daughter of two left-wing authors, Erica Jong and Jonathan Fast), such as this description:

[T]he MAGA meat grinder has clearly worn her down, not unlike the other women I've met who've been subjected to the president's abuse.  She is just slightly crumbly around the edges the way the president's other victims are.  

The theme is that the mean old Orange Man is picking on poor Lisa.

Trying to explain the timing of her speaking out in public, she makes a claim that doesn't withstand scrutiny:

For the nearly two years since her name first made the papers, she's been publicly silent (she did have a closed-door interview with House members in July 2018). I asked her why she was willing to talk now. "Honestly, his demeaning fake orgasm was really the straw that broke the camel's back," she says. The president called out her name as he acted out an orgasm in front of thousands of people at a Minneapolis rally on Oct. 11, 2019.

First of all, President Trump did not fake an orgasm.  Watch for yourself:

If that's what passes for an orgasm in Lisa's view, Peter Strzok is a lousy lover (which is no surprise, considering):

Here is what a genuine fake orgasm looks like:

Lisa hits feminist notes (of course):

"I had stayed quiet for years hoping it would fade away, but instead it got worse," she says. "It had been so hard not to defend myself, to let people who hate me control the narrative. I decided to take my power back." 

Jong-Fast resorts to trickery to claim that leaks (from whom?) indicate that Horowitz will "exonerate" her:

Leaked press accounts indicate that the report will exonerate Page of the allegation that she acted unprofessionally or showed bias against Trump.

The linked page says no such thing.

In painting herself as an innocent victim of Orange Man Bad, she claims she committed no crimes:

"It's almost impossible to describe" what it's like, she told me. "It's like being punched in the gut. My heart drops to my stomach when I realize he has tweeted about me again. The president of the United States is calling me names to the entire world. He's demeaning me and my career. It's sickening." 

"But it's also very intimidating because he's still the president of the United States. And when the president accuses you of treason by name, despite the fact that I know there's no fathomable way that I have committed any crime at all, let alone treason, he's still somebody in a position to actually do something about that. To try to further destroy my life. It never goes away or stops, even when he's not publicly attacking me."

Joe DiGenova, speaking on WMAL radio minutes ago, says this suggests Page has made a deal with prosecutors including a promise of no prosecution.  Otherwise, she would not be speaking out.

Sundance notices that Page's rehabilitation effort was actually kicked off by Lawfare founder Benjamin Wittes:

On November 8th of this year Lawfare founder Benjamin Wittes sent a rather curious tweet proclaiming his undying devotion to former FBI lawyer Lisa Page.  At the time it seemed rather odd and out of no-where; but today it makes sense.

At the time of Witte's tweet Lisa Page would have been scheduling her coming out narrative, and consulting with the DOJ/FBI "beach friend" community for PR advice.  After several weeks of planning and careful roll-out organization, noted by several weeks of contact with mutually aligned journalists, today Ms. Page steps into the spotlight with her introductory article in the Daily Beast, aptly titled: "Lisa Page Speaks". (snip)

When you read the article it jumps out at you. The victim narrative is from the exact same acting coaches hired by the FBI and used by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford; it's a little spooky how both Ms. Ford and Ms. Page could sound so identical, until you realize the same FBI and media people have constructed both victim storyboards.

Ms. Page decries what she has seen happen to her beloved FBI, that as she said "she grew up in".  Now, if that institutional attachment sounds a little over-the-top considering a grown woman started at the FBI in 2013 and resigned in 2018, well, it helps to remember this is the Public Relations advice from the DC-based FBI committee.

The DOJ/FBI 'above the law' crowd of beach friends assemble in the Lawfare conference room; look at the latest storyboards and plan the Lisa Page marketing, advertising and branding campaign.

She calls her adulterous affair with Peter Strzok "a deeply personal secret," even though it was a workplace affair with a colleague deeply involved with her in promoting the "insurance policy" against a Trump victory, and thus related to her official actions.

She claims: "She doesn't think for a minute that her texts with Peter Strzok are too political."

Yeah, right.

If this is the best defense she's got, there's trouble ahead for poor Lisa.


YouTube screen grab.